The Island of Dr. Moreau

The Island of Dr. Moreau

4.0 59
by H. G. Wells
     
 

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Edward Prendick is shipwrecked in the Pacific. Rescued by Doctor Moreau's assistant he is taken to the doctor's island home where he discovers the doctor has been experimenting on the animal inhabitants of the island, creating bizarre proto-humans...

Overview

Edward Prendick is shipwrecked in the Pacific. Rescued by Doctor Moreau's assistant he is taken to the doctor's island home where he discovers the doctor has been experimenting on the animal inhabitants of the island, creating bizarre proto-humans...

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940016223650
Publisher:
Wishland Publishing
Publication date:
02/11/2013
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Sales rank:
1,091,635
File size:
417 KB

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The Island of Dr. Moreau (Barnes & Noble Library of Essential Reading) 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 59 reviews.
Janus More than 1 year ago
Undoubtedly, H.G. Wells was a man who was years ahead of his time. Like Huxley, he seems to have anticipated the issues surrounding genetic manipulation years before such a thing was even a topic. As a book, The Island of Dr. Moreau reads like a slightly less stuffy gothic horror novel. While the characters may seem slightly cookie cutter for the genre (especially the doctor and the narrator) they all have slight quirks that set them apart from the normal lot. Each chapter is only about seven pages long and the story reads quickly. I can see how a really neat movie could be made from this, but nobody has succeeded yet (the version with Brando and Kilmer...ouch). For someone looking for a good 'abandoned on an island' type story, this is a really good one.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I thought the Island of Dr. Moreau was an excellent book to read. It was very imaginative and interesting. I would recommend for anyone to read this H.G. Wells classic but only if you like sci-fi. Otherwise it is not the book for you.
Cathytaffy More than 1 year ago
This book was incredibly exciting the whole way through. It is a fairly short story, but packed with so much adventure. It seemed like there was never a dull moment and the writing was so vivid and thrilling! The whole idea/theme of the book is a bit on the scary side, but it is not too gorey or terrifying, so I still enjoyed it and didn't have nightmares. This was my first book of HG Wells and I cannot wait to read another one of his novels now. Just from reading this one book, he may prove to be one of my new favorite writers. What a clever/genius storyteller!
theokester More than 1 year ago
I knew the high level concept of this book from allusions in other stories and movies, but I'd never read the original novel. It was a bit different from what I expected. The writing style is very accessible and fluid while also being jam-packed with very vivid and detailed descriptions as well as some in-depth scientific and moralistic discussions. The first few pages were a little slow, but the rest of the book, except for a paragraph here and there, flew by and kept me very hooked. The story is presented as a written report from the point of view of a narrator who finds himself stranded on the island for a time after some disasters at sea. The narrator has some scientific background which lends to very analytical and in-depth commentary. Without adding any real spoilers, the summary is this: Doctor Moreau, after being chased out of London for his practices, is living on an island in the pacific conducting outrageous experiments. Our narrator, Pendrick, finds the island populated with creatures that are neither completely human nor completely bestial...they are aberrations....creatures partially human and partially beasts....the face of a man with almost snout-like nose and lips, pointed hairy ears, elongated torso and shorter than normal legs, etc., etc., etc. The horrors and grotesque nature of the experiments are explored in depth and naturally progress to some rather disturbing conclusions. I rather enjoyed the story and found myself immersed in the plot and the concepts. My only real complaint by the end of the book was that it all ended too quickly. I would have loved another 50 or 100 pages. Still, it is a tightly woven tale with a lot of meet in it to leave you thinking. Wells presents a thoughtful narrative addressing some of the social concerns of his day through this science-fiction story. At that point in history (late 1800s), this was all seen as fiction but based on the fears people had of experiments in the medical community. It's even more potent now, since some 30-50 years after the book, the Nazis engaged in similar "scientific" experimentation during the Holocaust (not with the same results, but with a similar type of horror upon society). I really liked the way the book finished up. In the last few pages, we find our narrator trying to sort through everything he's witnessed and come to terms with it. I really enjoyed the way Wells shows him trying to recognize "humanity" in people and distinguish between the "human" and the "animal." A great read.
yarnspinner More than 1 year ago
Absolutely brilliant, horrific, and disturbing. This is the second time I've read this novel and I would classify it as more of a horror story than science fiction. I say that because it explores what happens when you couple genius with madness. In terms of horror, I would say this novel is only second to "Lord of the flies" which probes at the possibility, Is man inherently evil? Overall a fantastic read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
It's wonderfully written, but quite ominous and scary. The disturbing nature of the story should not be taken lightly.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I thought it was twisted and awesome
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Apparently, when the book was first released, it was poorly received mostly because the events portrayed are unpleasant. Later, it became somewhat of a classic book because (a.) readers began to appreciate the "educational" message that Wells was offering, (b.) it is now recognized as one of the original and ground breaking pieces in science fiction, and (c.) most recently, with some of the potential creations based on recent biological breakthroughs with regard to creating life forms, it has become more relevant. Both the negative and the positive are correct.
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Was a little slow at the beginning but it picked up speed and was a very enthralling and thought provoking piece.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Classic must read. Perhaps his best work.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The writing style led me comfortably along as I gathered clues as did the principal character. I was hoping for a more impactful resolution at the end. Even so, I am glad to have read it,
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gina4god More than 1 year ago
This is a classic and when I read it, could envision the story of how weird and creepy Dr Moreau was.
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