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The Island of Dr. Moreau (Barnes & Noble Library of Essential Reading) [NOOK Book]

Overview


When first published, The Island of Dr. Moreau (1896) shocked and horrified most of its readers and reviewers. Wells effectively employs disturbing elements to explore both the implications of evolutionary theory and to satirize modern society's religious institutions and its pride in its "civilization" - all through a story filled with suspense and adventure, capable of being read in a single page-turning sitting.

As with the other early ...
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The Island of Dr. Moreau (Barnes & Noble Library of Essential Reading)

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Overview


When first published, The Island of Dr. Moreau (1896) shocked and horrified most of its readers and reviewers. Wells effectively employs disturbing elements to explore both the implications of evolutionary theory and to satirize modern society's religious institutions and its pride in its "civilization" - all through a story filled with suspense and adventure, capable of being read in a single page-turning sitting.

As with the other early "scientific romances" that initiated Wells' literary career, The Island of Dr. Moreau successfully integrates serious ideas into a story driven not only by fast-paced action but also by Wells' gift for placing the fantastic parts of the story in the realistically depicted world of his audience. Thus Wells offered the growing field of science fiction an important model as well as one of its most highly regarded examples.
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Product Details

Meet the Author


Social philosopher, utopian, novelist, and "father" of science fiction and science fantasy, Herbert George Wells was born on September 21, 1866, in Bromley, Kent. His father was a poor businessman, and young Bertie's mother had to work as a lady's maid. Living "below stairs" with his mother at an estate called Uppark, Bertie would sneak into the grand library to read Plato, Swift, and Voltaire, authors who deeply influenced his later works. He shoed literary and artistic talent in his early stories and paintings, but the family had limited means, and when he was fourteen years old, Bertie was sent as an apprentice to a dealer in cloth and dry goods, work he disliked.

He held jobs in other trades before winning a scholarship to study biology at the Normal School of Science in London. The eminent biologist T. H. Huxley, a friend and proponent of Darwin, was his teacher; about him Wells later said, "I believed then he was the greatest man I was ever likely to meet." Under Huxley's influence, Wells learned the science that would inspire many of his creative works and cultivated the skepticism about the likelihood of human progress that would infuse his writing.

Teaching, textbook writing, and journalism occupied Wells until 1895, when he made his literary debut with the now-legendary novel The Time Machine, which was followed before the end of the century by The Island of Dr. Moreau, The Invisible Man, and The War of the Worlds, books that established him as a major writer. Fiercely critical of Victorian mores, he published voluminously, in fiction and nonfiction, on the subject of politics and social philosophy. Biological evolution does not ensure moral progress, as Wells would repeat throughout his life, during which he witnessed two world wars and the debasement of science for military and political ends.

In addition to social commentary presented in the guise of science fiction, Wells authored comic novels like Love and Mrs. Lewisham, Kipps, and The History of Mister Polly that are Dickensian in their scope and feeling, and a feminist novel, Ann Veronica. He wrote specific social commentary in The New Machiavelli, an attack on the socialist Fabian Society, which he had joined and then rejected, and literary parody (of Henry James) in Boon. He wrote textbooks of biology, and his massive The Outline of History was a major international bestseller.

By the time Wells reached middle age, he was admired around the world, and he used his fame to promote his utopian vision, warning that the future promised "Knowledge or extinction." He met with such preeminent political figures as Lenin, Roosevelt, and Stalin, and continued to publish, travel, and educate during his final years. Herbert George Wells died in London on August 13, 1946.

Author biography from the Barnes & Noble Classics edition of The War of the Worlds.

Biography

Social philosopher, utopian, novelist, and "father" of science fiction and science fantasy, Herbert George Wells was born on September 21, 1866, in Bromley, Kent. His father was a poor businessman, and young Bertie's mother had to work as a lady's maid. Living "below stairs" with his mother at an estate called Uppark, Bertie would sneak into the grand library to read Plato, Swift, and Voltaire, authors who deeply influenced his later works. He shoed literary and artistic talent in his early stories and paintings, but the family had limited means, and when he was fourteen years old, Bertie was sent as an apprentice to a dealer in cloth and dry goods, work he disliked.

He held jobs in other trades before winning a scholarship to study biology at the Normal School of Science in London. The eminent biologist T. H. Huxley, a friend and proponent of Darwin, was his teacher; about him Wells later said, "I believed then he was the greatest man I was ever likely to meet." Under Huxley's influence, Wells learned the science that would inspire many of his creative works and cultivated the skepticism about the likelihood of human progress that would infuse his writing.

Teaching, textbook writing, and journalism occupied Wells until 1895, when he made his literary debut with the now-legendary novel The Time Machine, which was followed before the end of the century by The Island of Dr. Moreau, The Invisible Man, and The War of the Worlds, books that established him as a major writer. Fiercely critical of Victorian mores, he published voluminously, in fiction and nonfiction, on the subject of politics and social philosophy. Biological evolution does not ensure moral progress, as Wells would repeat throughout his life, during which he witnessed two world wars and the debasement of science for military and political ends.

In addition to social commentary presented in the guise of science fiction, Wells authored comic novels like Love and Mrs. Lewisham, Kipps, and The History of Mister Polly that are Dickensian in their scope and feeling, and a feminist novel, Ann Veronica. He wrote specific social commentary in The New Machiavelli, an attack on the socialist Fabian Society, which he had joined and then rejected, and literary parody (of Henry James) in Boon. He wrote textbooks of biology, and his massive The Outline of History was a major international bestseller.

By the time Wells reached middle age, he was admired around the world, and he used his fame to promote his utopian vision, warning that the future promised "Knowledge or extinction." He met with such preeminent political figures as Lenin, Roosevelt, and Stalin, and continued to publish, travel, and educate during his final years. Herbert George Wells died in London on August 13, 1946.

Author biography from the Barnes & Noble Classics edition of The War of the Worlds.

Good To Know

In 1891, Wells married his cousin Isabel. However, he eventually left her for one of his brightest students, Amy Catherine, whom he married in 1895.

Wells was once interviewed on the radio by an extremely nervous Orson Welles. The two are unrelated, of course.

Many of Wells's novels became film adaptations, including The Island of Dr. Moreau, filmed in 1996 by Richard Stanley and John Frankenheimer, and The Time Machine, filmed in 2002 by Wells's great-grandson, Simon Wells.

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    1. Also Known As:
      Herbert George Wells (full name)
    1. Date of Birth:
      September 21, 1866
    2. Place of Birth:
      Bromley, Kent, England
    1. Date of Death:
      August 13, 1946
    2. Place of Death:
      London, England

Introduction

Late in his life H. G. Wells described his early novel The Island of Doctor Moreau (1896) as "an exercise in youthful blasphemy," and its initial publication shocked and horrified most of its first readers and reviewers. Indeed, the novel is shocking and horrifying, but the older Wells underestimated the book after its hostile reception in 1896 calling it "unlucky." Instead, in The Island of Doctor Moreau Wells effectively employs disturbing elements both to explore the implications of evolutionary theory and to satirize modern society's religious institutions and its pride in its "civilization" - all through a story filled with suspense and adventure, capable of being read in a single page-turning sitting. As with the other early "scientific romances" that initiated Wells' literary career, The Island of Doctor Moreau successfully integrates serious ideas into a story driven not only by fast-paced action but also by Wells' gift for placing the fantastic parts of the story in the realistically depicted world of his audience. Thus in The Island of Doctor Moreau as well as his other early scientific romances, Wells offered the growing field of science fiction an important model as well as some of its most highly regarded examples.

Herbert George Wells (1866-1946) hardly had the type of background one would expect of someone who became one of the most successful and frequently discussed writers of his time. Born in Bromley, Kent, a suburb of London, to a housekeeper and a gardener and sometime cricket player, Wells in his childhood found his voracious quest for knowledge thwarted by his parents' financial limitations and their desire to place him ingainful apprenticeships. In his teens he began his education in earnest, showing a particular interest in science. But Wells also harbored literary ambitions, publishing essays and stories and even science textbooks while eking out a living as a teacher until he could survive on the products of his prolific pen. His first major success came before he was thirty: The Time Machine (1895), the first of his scientific romances. Like this novel, his second scientific romance, The Island of Doctor Moreau, drew upon Wells' scientific training to present a literary work that took speculative ideas and made them real. He did so both to entertain his readers and to make them think - especially to reconsider their smug assurance in their culture's achievements and in their belief that they had transcended their animal natures as the zenith of evolutionary development. Thus The Island of Doctor Moreau is consistent with most of Wells' other writings, concerned with both engaging readers and educating them.

Many critics have faulted Wells for growing increasingly concerned with educating his readers and becoming less interested in entertaining them as his career developed. Although in his early career he befriended such writers as Henry James and Joseph Conrad and at times espoused views about the novel as art similar to theirs, and although Wells certainly had aspirations for his scientific romances higher than other scientific romances being published in England at the same time, for the most part Wells increasingly saw his writing, both fiction and nonfiction, as a means toward an end rather than an end in itself. This end, as he himself admitted, involved both educating his readers and critiquing the scientific, social, and political views of his day. Thus if one chronologically scans the dozens of titles Wells published in his lengthy career as a writer, one sees an increasing number of nonfiction titles as his career advanced and a decreasing number of novels and story collections. Similarly, if one explores only the fiction, one notices that the works become more and more absorbed with issues such as the institution of marriage, women's roles, and political ideas.

To some extent this tendency is foreshadowed in even the earliest of Wells' novels, especially the scientific romances for which he remains best known: The Time Machine (1895), The Island of Doctor Moreau (1896), The Invisible Man (1897), The War of the Worlds (1898), When the Sleeper Wakes (1899), and The First Men in the Moon (1901). While none of these is as deliberate in its discussion of ideas as most of his later novels would become, nonetheless all of them are not only exciting science-fiction stories but also infused with meditations upon science, particularly its uses and abuses. Also, many of them comment on social and political ideas.

Of course, Wells' inspiration for The Island of Doctor Moreau is more complex than an inclination to write about ideas in his fiction. Just as Doctor Moreau creates hybrids of animals in some of his grisly experiments, so Wells here combines a number of different concepts and conceits to create something entirely unique. For one, obviously much of the main idea of The Island of Doctor Moreau stems from the contemporary debate over vivisection (surgery upon a living being), which at the time was quite intense. Doctor Moreau is, strictly speaking, a vivisectionist, though one utterly unlike any of Wells' day. This difference comes from Wells' combination of the theme of vivisection with another idea, which could have come from a wide array of sources - that of experimenting upon animals to make them something radically different from what they were. One possible source could be any number of fantastic works in which animals are in various ways given human qualities, whether by magic or by divine intervention, as in the case of Balaam's ass in the Bible, Apuleius' The Golden Ass, beast fables, and mythology. The difference here parallels Wells' intent in The Time Machine: to take a fantastic trope, such as time travel or metamorphosis, and present it not as happening by magic or some other fantastic means but as occurring in ways that are made to seem scientifically plausible. Thus the metamorphosis of Moreau's Beast Folk occurs not by supernatural means but under the scalpel. The inspiration thus involves taking the fantastic trope of animal metamorphosis and rendering it in science-fiction terms. Related to this is one of the literary inspirations for the novel, Mary Shelley's Frankenstein (1818, 1831). Both Victor Frankenstein and Doctor Moreau create human beings from parts of other beings; the difference is that Frankenstein uses corpses, while Moreau uses animals. Other literary echoes include William Shakespeare's The Tempest, John Milton's Comus, Daniel Defoe's Robinson Crusoe, and especially Robert Louis Stevenson's The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1886), with its treatment of humanity's dual nature.

Yet its underlying ideas make The Island of Doctor Moreau more complex than a simple combination of various literary sources and scientifically reinterpreted myth. Related to Wells' combination of animal transformation and vivisection is the theory of evolution, hotly debated in England and elsewhere following the publication of Charles Darwin's On the Origin of Species (1859). Wells' lifelong lack of sympathy for traditional religious beliefs and his scientific training readily led him to accept evolution as scientific fact, and he was especially impressed as a student by the views of his teacher T. H. Huxley (1825-1895). Huxley, who earned the nickname "Darwin's bulldog" for his tenacious defense of evolutionary theory, derided the popular notion held by many in the late nineteenth century that humanity represented the pinnacle of evolutionary development. Instead, Huxley argued, there was no guarantee that humanity would either remain as it was or continue as the dominant species on the planet. Nature, he argued, simply forced species to try to survive or face extinction; it had no notions of "progress." Such ideas were a major influence on The Time Machine, in which Wells presented two different human species of the far future, neither as intellectually developed as humanity in 1895, and in the further future the Time Traveler finds that humanity has become extinct.

Similarly, in The Island of Doctor Moreau Wells, influenced by Huxley, suggests that for all their pride in their status among the other animals and in their civilization, humans are not as high and mighty as they would like to think. For one thing, the novel suggests, human beings are not all that different from the Beast Folk. We too are animals, Wells reminds us, as he presents us with a number of human characters who variously act in beastly ways. For all our civilization, Wells says, we are not far removed from our "lower" kin. As Wells explained in his preface to the novel in the 1924 Atlantic Edition of his collected works, humanity is "in perpetual conflict between instinct and injunction." Just as Doctor Moreau's Beast Folk revert to their animal natures, Wells suggests that the same could apply to human beings - that our civilized veneers are mere masks hiding the beasts we could so easily become. Even if those aspects of humanity that separate us from the other animals are more ingrained, the novel suggests, there is no guarantee that the human race will forever retain this "higher" nature. In the Beast Folk's regression is a possible warning of our own fate, echoing the more explicit message of The Time Machine.

As if to drive the point home, Wells returns his protagonist, the shipwrecked Prendick, a former student of Huxley's who has witnessed Moreau's experiments and their consequences, to England a changed man - not changed so much physically, as he had at first feared, but in the way he views his fellow human beings. Now he no longer sees them as simply human - the animal in them shows through. Only in books can Prendick regain the sense of humanity's superior spark of something that transcends its animal origins.

The conclusion of The Island of Doctor Moreau thus echoes that of one of Wells' major literary influences, Jonathan Swift's Gulliver's Travels (1726). In Swift's novel, Lemuel Gulliver, whose last adventure had landed him among the rational equestrian Houyhnhnms and the seemingly human yet animalistic Yahoos, also returns to England a changed man, seeing his fellow human beings as beastly and trying instead to talk to the horses. (A similar ending, incidentally, occurs in Wells' friend Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness, published just a few years after The Island of Doctor Moreau.) Medieval maps often marked the terra incognita of the Atlantic with the phrase, "Here there be monsters," which Wells makes a reality, yet he also reminds us that England is also an island, and the monsters are among us even in the "civilized" world.

Wells freely admitted that Swift was a major influence on his work, and he especially admired both Swift's gift for satire and his desire to expose human folly in hopes of improving society. While Wells would later focus on the latter goal, certainly Swiftian satire is present in The Island of Doctor Moreau-especially in the satirical treatment of the Beast Folk's religious reverence of Moreau, who assumes a godlike status among his creations, and in the Law given to them, which parodies not only religious laws such as the Ten Commandments but also the "Law of the Jungle" in Rudyard Kipling's The Second Jungle Book (1895). Some critics have also seen the novel as an allegory of colonialism.

Additionally, the novel ridicules a romantic view of nature expressed by thinkers such as Jean-Jacques Rousseau, who argued that in a state of nature humanity was essentially perfect, and that it was civilization that corrupted their natural dignity. From an evolutionary standpoint, Wells would have seen Rousseau's notion of the "noble savage" as patently absurd. People are naturally more like the animals from which we evolved, Wells would have said, "savage" or not - and the idea that Wells may have been responding to Rousseau's brand of romanticism is suggested in the fact that Moreau's island, which Wells invented and placed near the Galapagos Islands that Darwin investigated, is ironically named Noble's Isle.

For all of this richness of ideas, the initial readers and reviewers of The Island of Doctor Moreau for the most part failed to see the novel as satirical or to view it as anything other than a compendium of horrors. As Ingvald Raknem explains, Wells' earlier works "evoked. . .a sympathetic response" because most of them "were pleasantly satirical, agreeable, and amusing," whereas The Island of Doctor Moreau "outraged the critics' sense of propriety. The atrocities of Dr. Moreau disgusted them, and blinded them to any merits in the book." The negative critical verdict was almost unanimous, with only a few reviewers writing that the novel possessed any artistic qualities. However, the novel did find a few appreciative readers, and as time passed three things happened to preserve the book from literary oblivion. First, Wells' next two scientific romances, The Invisible Man and The War of the Worlds, were both popular and critical successes, thus ensuring Wells a continued audience who might come back to The Island of Doctor Moreau with a different perspective. Second, critics decades later began to look past the horrors depicted in the novel to Wells' purposes in presenting them, thus leading to a reevaluation of the book. Finally, in the early to mid-1900s, Wells was adopted by an emerging science-fiction community, many of whom read his early scientific romances reprinted in pulp magazines, as one of the parents of the genre, whose works - among them The Island of Doctor Moreau - laid the foundations for the field. Thus the work today has two different critical rankings: in academic circles Wells' early scientific romances, including The Island of Doctor Moreau, are generally accepted as his most noteworthy works, and while they may not be granted the canonical status of the better work of contemporaries such as James and Conrad, they are considered worth reading and studying. In contrast, in the science-fiction community The Island of Doctor Moreau and its companions from Wells' early career are considered classics, widely regarded as among the greatest works of the genre. So despite its shaky start, The Island of Doctor Moreau has endured.

Moreover, The Island of Doctor Moreau has served as an inspiration for several other literary works as well as adaptations on the stage and screen. In addition to a few now-obscure parodies and tributes, Wells' novel provided the point of departure for revisions and expansions such as Josef Nesvadba's story "Doctor Moreau's Other Island" (1971), Michael Bishop's story "The White Otters of Childhood" (1973), Brian W. Aldiss' novel Moreau's Other Island (1980), and Gene Wolfe's story "The Island of Doctor Death and Other Stories" (1980). Other science-fiction writers, such as Cordwainer Smith and David Brin, have also dealt with the notion of animals being raised to humanlike status, and echoes of Moreau's experiments can be found in Margaret Atwood's Oryx and Crake (2003). Moreau and his Beast Folk (considerably changed, drawing upon several popular sources rather than Wells' description) also appear in the second volume of Alan Moore and Kevin O'Neill's graphic novel The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen (2003), a postmodern conflation of a number of fantastic British works of the fin de si├Ęcle. Wells' novel has also served as the basis for a short play by Joel Stone, Horrors of Doctor Moreau (1972), and several film versions, which in focusing on the horrific or spectacular elements of the story consistently fail to do justice to the novel's thematic richness.

To experience this richness, of course, there is no substitute for reading the book. Unlike many other examples of what could be called the literature of ideas, however, this is hardly a burden, given the way in which Wells successfully grafts his scientific, theological, and social meditations onto an accessible, well-crafted narrative that thrills and chills. It is no wonder that, more than a century after its composition, The Island of Doctor Moreau still attracts readers, who find Wells at his best, a master storyteller who challenged his audience to think.

Darren Harris-Fain is an associate professor of English at Shawnee State University in Portsmouth, Ohio. He holds a Ph.D. in English from Kent State University and has edited three volumes on British fantasy and science-fiction writers.
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4
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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 62 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 19, 2004

    ANOTHER CLASSIC SCI-FI BOOK FOR ALL TO READ

    I thought the Island of Dr. Moreau was an excellent book to read. It was very imaginative and interesting. I would recommend for anyone to read this H.G. Wells classic but only if you like sci-fi. Otherwise it is not the book for you.

    5 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 21, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    The Island of Dr. Moreau

    Undoubtedly, H.G. Wells was a man who was years ahead of his time. Like Huxley, he seems to have anticipated the issues surrounding genetic manipulation years before such a thing was even a topic. As a book, The Island of Dr. Moreau reads like a slightly less stuffy gothic horror novel. While the characters may seem slightly cookie cutter for the genre (especially the doctor and the narrator) they all have slight quirks that set them apart from the normal lot. Each chapter is only about seven pages long and the story reads quickly. I can see how a really neat movie could be made from this, but nobody has succeeded yet (the version with Brando and Kilmer...ouch). For someone looking for a good 'abandoned on an island' type story, this is a really good one.

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted April 8, 2010

    more from this reviewer

    A Favorite

    This book was incredibly exciting the whole way through. It is a fairly short story, but packed with so much adventure. It seemed like there was never a dull moment and the writing was so vivid and thrilling!
    The whole idea/theme of the book is a bit on the scary side, but it is not too gorey or terrifying, so I still enjoyed it and didn't have nightmares. This was my first book of HG Wells and I cannot wait to read another one of his novels now. Just from reading this one book, he may prove to be one of my new favorite writers. What a clever/genius storyteller!

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 15, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    A Transforming Experience

    I knew the high level concept of this book from allusions in other stories and movies, but I'd never read the original novel. It was a bit different from what I expected.

    The writing style is very accessible and fluid while also being jam-packed with very vivid and detailed descriptions as well as some in-depth scientific and moralistic discussions. The first few pages were a little slow, but the rest of the book, except for a paragraph here and there, flew by and kept me very hooked.

    The story is presented as a written report from the point of view of a narrator who finds himself stranded on the island for a time after some disasters at sea. The narrator has some scientific background which lends to very analytical and in-depth commentary.

    Without adding any real spoilers, the summary is this: Doctor Moreau, after being chased out of London for his practices, is living on an island in the pacific conducting outrageous experiments. Our narrator, Pendrick, finds the island populated with creatures that are neither completely human nor completely bestial...they are aberrations....creatures partially human and partially beasts....the face of a man with almost snout-like nose and lips, pointed hairy ears, elongated torso and shorter than normal legs, etc., etc., etc. The horrors and grotesque nature of the experiments are explored in depth and naturally progress to some rather disturbing conclusions.

    I rather enjoyed the story and found myself immersed in the plot and the concepts. My only real complaint by the end of the book was that it all ended too quickly. I would have loved another 50 or 100 pages. Still, it is a tightly woven tale with a lot of meet in it to leave you thinking.

    Wells presents a thoughtful narrative addressing some of the social concerns of his day through this science-fiction story. At that point in history (late 1800s), this was all seen as fiction but based on the fears people had of experiments in the medical community. It's even more potent now, since some 30-50 years after the book, the Nazis engaged in similar "scientific" experimentation during the Holocaust (not with the same results, but with a similar type of horror upon society).

    I really liked the way the book finished up. In the last few pages, we find our narrator trying to sort through everything he's witnessed and come to terms with it. I really enjoyed the way Wells shows him trying to recognize "humanity" in people and distinguish between the "human" and the "animal."

    A great read.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted August 6, 2013

    Absolutely brilliant, horrific, and disturbing. This is the seco

    Absolutely brilliant, horrific, and disturbing. This is the second time I've read this novel and I would classify it as more of a horror story than science fiction. I say that because it explores what happens when you couple genius with madness. In terms of horror, I would say this novel is only second to "Lord of the flies" which probes at the possibility, Is man inherently evil? Overall a fantastic read.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 29, 2012

    It Certainly Kept My Interest to the End

    The writing style led me comfortably along as I gathered clues as did the principal character. I was hoping for a more impactful resolution at the end. Even so, I am glad to have read it,

    2 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 13, 2012

    A Classic

    It's wonderfully written, but quite ominous and scary. The disturbing nature of the story should not be taken lightly.

    2 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 14, 2013

    Awesome$

    I thought it was twisted and awesome

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted June 28, 2014

    Nice,,,, Great...!

    Nice,,,, Great...!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 19, 2014

    POSEIDON CABIN

    Here

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 10, 2013

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 27, 2013

    This is an impprtant question

    Does anyone want to hav sex with me? I am 15 and am dying to see someone naked and on top of me. U can be a boy or girl. I dont cae which one but i kinda want a boy cuz i qant to get pregnant with total stranger. I cang wait to have a boys penis go up my vagina and let tiny little sperms out that will fertalize my eggs which makes a baby. Also u have to lick an suck on my vagina then drink milk from my huge boobs. I am looking forwrd to seeing u butt naked on top of me touching me all over.

    0 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 8, 2013

    Science Fiction Classic

    Was a little slow at the beginning but it picked up speed and was a very enthralling and thought provoking piece.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 23, 2012

    Ahead of its time!

    Classic must read. Perhaps his best work.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 21, 2012

    Book

    Ye dies at the end haha jk ifk how it ends

    0 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 14, 2011

    Book

    Should i get this book for pace?

    0 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 24, 2011

    Highly Recommend

    This is a classic and when I read it, could envision the story of how weird and creepy Dr Moreau was.

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  • Posted January 9, 2011

    One of my favorites.

    Great book. It kept me reading till the ending. Wished it didn't end that way.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 1, 2004

    great book

    This is a book about a sailor named Edward Prendick who was traveling aboard a ship that was lost by collision. There was only three men, but one went crazy and fell off the dinghy taking another man with him. Only Prendick remained, and he was saved by a passing boat and the man who saved him was Montgomery. The boat was headed for Hawaii but for some unfortunate reason Prendick and Montgomery had to get off on a small island with Dr. Moreau. Dr. Moreau is a scientist, who has been forced out of England for his strange experiments. His experiments consist of taking animals and giving them human like intelligence and form. So now Prendick is stuck on the island with half human half animal creatures and that¿s when the adventure starts. I had a good time reading this book because it is filled with exciting adventures and action. This book is a great book for anyone to read. My favorite part of the book is when the half humans half animals turn against Dr.Moreau and the rest of the men. I liked this book a lot and there was nothing bad to say about it. I would recommend this book to anybody that likes science fiction books.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 24, 2001

    A review for Parr's weekly

    The novel I read was quite interesting.This peticular book was one of the strangest books that I had ever read in my thirteen years of my life.The book I read was the Island of Dr.Moreau by H.G. Wells.H.G. Wells is an extreamly weired writer.He writes like something I have ever read before.But he is a good writer.The Island of Dr.Moreau's plot was great. The part in the book that I liked the best was when Edward Pendrick(a person they found drifting in a small life boat) was on Dr.Moreau's island and was being chased by half human,half animal (that tried to eat him) like things on the edge of the island where the ocean was. Suddenly he whips around and whacks the animal in the left tempal knocking it directly unconcience. In this part that I just told you it tells what happen with alot of details. And thoose details where great.Thanks for reading my review and I hope you read this book. And again thanks!!!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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