Isle of Dogs (Andy Brazil Series #3)

( 195 )

Overview

Patricia Cornwell’s novels of big-city police have taken this classic genre to a new level. Now, with this #1 New York Times bestselling novel, she outdoes herself, with a wry tale of life and turmoil behind the blue wall.

Chaos breaks loose when the governor of Virginia orders that speed traps be painted on all streets and highways, and warns that speeders will be caught by monitoring aircraft flying overhead. But the eccentric island of Tangier, fourteen miles off the coast of...

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Overview

Patricia Cornwell’s novels of big-city police have taken this classic genre to a new level. Now, with this #1 New York Times bestselling novel, she outdoes herself, with a wry tale of life and turmoil behind the blue wall.

Chaos breaks loose when the governor of Virginia orders that speed traps be painted on all streets and highways, and warns that speeders will be caught by monitoring aircraft flying overhead. But the eccentric island of Tangier, fourteen miles off the coast of Virginia in Chesapeake Bay, responds by declaring war on its own state. Judy Hammer, newly installed as the superintendent of the Virginia State Police, and Andy Brazil, a state trooper and Hammer’s right hand and confidant, find themselves at their wits’ end as they try to protect the public from the politicians—and vice versa—in this pitch-perfect, darkly comic romp.

Chaos breaks loose when the governor of Virginia orders that speed traps be painted on all streets and highways, warning that speeders will be caught by monitoring aircraft flying overhead. But the eccentric Isle of Tangier, fourteen miles off the coast of Virginia in the Chesapeake Bay, responds by declaring war on its own state.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
Internationally acclaimed as America’s preeminent crime writer for her peerless Kay Scarpetta series, Patricia Cornwell has also established herself as a wry and witty observer of the grueling nature of police work, the mind-set of investigators, and the incredible obstacles faced by police officers and administrators trying to solve a case.

Following up on her sly crime satires Hornet’s Nest and Southern Cross -- both of which were No. 1 New York Times bestsellers -- Cornwell again takes us behind the Blue Wall with the latest Andy Brazil and Judy Hammer novel, Isle of Dogs. This time Brazil and Hammer are off to Richmond, Virginia, to clean up yet another police precinct troubled by all manner of corruption, bureaucracy, and “helpful” politicians and public officials. There they find a dim-witted governor with a deranged plan to distract his constituents from real problems by setting up bogus speed traps throughout the state. When the first trap is planted on Tangier Island -- even though there are virtually no cars on the small, isolated, isle -- the outraged locals take their dentist hostage, secede from the Commonwealth, and declare civil war. And that’s just the start of the crazed, crime-ridden days ahead, as Brazil and Hammer struggle to maintain order while contending with nasty local politicking, a fickle and panicked public, and a government gone deliriously haywire.

This wry, witty, and knowing look at the behind-the-scenes turmoil of police departments -- and the lives of men and women in blue -- once again showcases Cornwell's darkly comic talents. Those talents may be less familiar to the legions of Kay Scarpetta fans out there, but they are no less powerful.

From The Critics
While Cornwell's latest audiobook, Isle of Dogs, is entertainingly narrated, it will probably appeal only to fans of lightweight mysteries. The broad plot involves a psychotic serial killer and a band of modern-day pirates, as well as police chief Judy Hammer and journalist-turned-cop Andy Brazil, both of whom appeared in Southern Cross and Hornet's Nest. Cornwell relies heavily on a whimsical but annoying story line featuring animals endowed with human intelligence. Michele Hall infuses the book with energy and brings much-needed humor to the material.
—Rochelle O'Gorman
Library Journal
Having created a welcome departure from the Kay Scarpetta series with Hornet's Nest and Southern Cross, Cornwell seeks another venue in Isle of Dogs (with unabridged narration by Michelle Hall), though the change is a stylistic failure. Attempting a satiric, tongue-in-cheek approach to crime and mystery, the novel falls flat. The characters tend toward broad, poorly conceived stereotypes, and Judy Hammer, once a promising and strong female role model in law enforcement, is reduced to anxious pacing while Andy Brazil hides behind a series of internet articles by "Trooper Truth" that explore the history of Virginia and pirates. Brazil's alterego is so poorly disguised that the pure stupidity of the characters in the book keep them clueless to his real identity. The strengths of Cornwell's books have been the crises and conflicts raised in tense chess play between good and evil. In this one, wordplay buries the plot, and the result is often silly and painful. The major benefit to the abridged edition, read by Becky Baker, is the excision of some of the endless prattle in the overlapping subplots. Very disappointing; not recommended. Joyce Kessel, Villa Maria Coll., Buffalo, NY Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780425182901
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
  • Publication date: 9/24/2002
  • Series: Andy Brazil Series , #3
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Pages: 432
  • Sales rank: 423,720
  • Product dimensions: 6.56 (w) x 11.06 (h) x 1.15 (d)

Meet the Author

Patricia  Cornwell
Patricia Cornwell's international bestsellers include Postmortem-the only novel to win the Edgar, Creasey, Anthony, and Macavity awards and the French Prix du Roman d'Aventure in a single year-and Cruel and Unusual, which won Britain's prestigious Gold Dagger Award for the year's best crime novel in 1993. Her fictional chief medical examiner, Dr. Kay Scarpetta, won the 1999 Sherlock Award for best detective created by an American author. Cornwell has also helped establish the Virginia Institute of Forensic Science and Medicine, the first forensic training facility of its kind in the nation. Cornwell serves as the Institute's Chairman of the Board.

Biography

Patricia Cornwell writes crime fiction from an unusually informed point of view. While many writers are, as she says, conjuring up "fantasy" assumptions regarding what really goes into tracking criminals and examining crime scenes, Cornwell really does walk the walk, which is why her novels ring so true.

Before becoming one of the most widely recognized, respected, and read writers in contemporary crime fiction, she worked as a police reporter for The Charlotte Observer and as a computer analyst in the chief medical examiner's office in Virginia. During this period of her life, Cornwell observed literally hundreds of autopsies. While the vast majority of people would surely regard such work unsavory beyond belief, Cornwell was acquiring valuable information that would not only help her write the groundbreaking 2002 study Portrait of a Killer: Jack the Ripper -- Case Closed but would also enrich her fiction with uncommon authenticity.

"Most of these crime scene shows... are what I call ‘Harry Potter' policing," she said in a candid, heated interview. "They're absolutely fantasy. And the problem is the general public watches these, 60 million people a week or whatever, and they think what they're seeing is true." If Cornwell comes off as a bit vehement in her criticism of television shows meant to simply entertain, that's just because she takes her work so seriously.

Not that Cornwell's novels are ever anything short of entertaining, even if their grisly details may require extra-strong stomachs of her readers. She has created a tremendously well-defined and complex character in her favorite fictional crime solver Dr. Kay Scarpetta. Cornwell introduced medical examiner Scarpetta in her first novel, Postmortem in 1990. Today, Scarpetta is still cracking cases and cracking open cadavers. (She has even inspired a cook book called Food to Die For: Secrets from Kay Scarpetta's Kitchen.) In addition, Cornwell writes more lighthearted cop capers in her Andy Brazil & Judy Hammer series.

Good To Know

Cornwell knows what its like to shatter records. Her debut, Postmortem, was the only novel by a first-time author to ever win five major mystery awards in a single year.

Cornwell may be a former crime solver, but she shudders to think that her books could actually contribute to crime. In fact, she says she has received "thank you" notes from prisoners who claim they have gleaned information from her books that might help them cover their tracks while committing future crimes.

If parody is indeed the sincerest form of flattery, then Cornwell has a fan in Chris Elliott. The professional wisenheimer published a hilarious takeoff on her true crime book Portrait of a Killer called The Shroud of the Thwacker.

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    1. Also Known As:
      Patricia Daniels Cornwell (full name)
    2. Hometown:
      Boston, MA and New York, NY
    1. Date of Birth:
      June 9, 1956
    2. Place of Birth:
      Miami, Florida
    1. Education:
      B.A. in English, Davidson College, 1979; King College
    2. Website:

Read an Excerpt

Unique First fit her name like a glove, or at least this

was how her mother always put it. Unique came first

and was one of a kind. There was no one else like

her—and this was a damn good thing, to quote her

father, Dr. Ulysses First, who had never understood what genetic

malignancy blighted his only child.

Unique was a petite eighteen-year-old with long, shimmering

hair that was as black as ebony, and her skin was translucent

like milk glass, her lips full and pink. She believed that

her pale blue eyes could mesmerize whoever looked into them

and that by casting as little as a glance at someone she could

bend that person’s mind to fit her Purpose. Unique could

haunt someone for weeks, building up unbearable anticipation

until the final act, which was a necessary and frenzied release,

usually followed by a blackout.

“Hey, wake up, my car’s broke down.” She knocked on the

window of the Peterbilt eighteen-wheeler that was parked all

by itself at the Farmers’ Market on the fringes of downtown

Richmond. “I’m wondering if you got a phone?”

It was 4:00 A.M., pitch dark, and the parking lot was poorly

lit. Although Moses Custer knew very well that it wasn’t safe

to be out here alone at this hour, he had ignored his usual good

judgment after fighting with his wife and storming off in his

truck, where he intended to spend the night, alone and missing

in action, out by the vegetable stands. That would sure show

her, he always thought when their marital routine turned ugly.

He opened the door of his cab as the knocking on the glass

continued.

“Lordy, what’s a sweet little thing like you doing out here at

this hour?” Moses asked, confused and drunk, as he stared at

the creamy, delicate face smiling at him like an angel.

“You’re about to have a unique experience.” Unique said

the same thing she always did right before she moved in for

her Purpose.

“What’chu mean?” Moses puzzled. “What unique ’sperience?”

The answer came in a legion of demons that kicked and

pounded Moses and ripped at his hair and clothes. Explosions

and obscenities erupted from hell, and fire seared his muscles

and bones as savage forces beat and tore him to shreds and left

him dead and drove off in his truck. Moses hovered above his

dead self for a while, watching his mauled, lifeless body on

the tarmac. Blood streamed out from under his head as rain

smacked down, and one of his boots was off and his left arm

was at an angle that wasn’t natural. As Moses gazed down on

himself, a part of him was worn out and ready for Eternity

while another part of him regretted his life and grieved.

“My head’s ruined,” he moaned and began to sob as everything

went black. “Ohhh, my head’s ruined. Lord, I ain’t

ready! It ain’t my time yet!”

Complete darkness dissolved to a floating airspace from which

Moses watched pulsing emergency lights and urgent firemen,

paramedics, and police in yellow rain slickers with reflective tape

that glared like white fire. Flares hissed on wet pavement as a

heavy cold rain fell, and voices were excited and loud and made

no sense. It seemed people were yelling at him and it frightened

Moses and made him feel small and ashamed. He tried to open

his eyes, but it was as if they had been sewn shut.

“What happened to the angel?” he kept muttering. “She

said her car broke down.”

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Table of Contents

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First Chapter

Isle of Dogs, Chapter 1

One

Unique First fit her name like a glove, or at least this was how her mother always put it. Unique came first and was one of a kind. There was no one else like her-and this was a damn good thing, to quote her father, Dr. Ulysses First, who had never understood what genetic malignancy blighted his only child.

Unique was a petite eighteen-year-old with long, shimmering hair that was as black as ebony, and her skin was translucent like milk glass, her lips full and pink. She believed that her pale blue eyes could mesmerize whoever looked into them and that by casting as little as a glance at someone she could bend that person's mind to fit her Purpose. Unique could haunt someone for weeks, building up unbearable anticipation until the final act, which was a necessary and frenzied release, usually followed by a blackout.

"Hey, wake up, my car's broke down." She knocked on the window of the Peterbilt eighteen-wheeler that was parked all by itself at the Farmers' Market on the fringes of downtown Richmond. "I'm wondering if you got a phone?"

It was 4:00 A.M., pitch dark, and the parking lot was poorly lit. Although Moses Custer knew very well that it wasn't safe to be out here alone at this hour, he had ignored his usual good judgment after fighting with his wife and storming off in his truck, where he intended to spend the night, alone and missing in action, out by the vegetable stands. That would sure show her, he always thought when their marital routine turned ugly. He opened the door of his cab as the knocking on the glass continued.

"Lordy, what's a sweet little thing like you doing out here at this hour?" Moses asked, confused and drunk, as he stared at the creamy, delicate face smiling at him like an angel.

"You're about to have a unique experience." Unique said the same thing she always did right before she moved in for her Purpose.

"What'chu mean?" Moses puzzled. "What unique 'sperience?"

The answer came in a legion of demons that kicked and pounded Moses and ripped at his hair and clothes. Explosions and obscenities erupted from hell, and fire seared his muscles and bones as savage forces beat and tore him to shreds and left him dead and drove off in his truck. Moses hovered above his dead self for a while, watching his mauled, lifeless body on the tarmac. Blood streamed out from under his head as rain smacked down, and one of his boots was off and his left arm was at an angle that wasn't natural. As Moses gazed down on himself, a part of him was worn out and ready for Eternity while another part of him regretted his life and grieved.

"My head's ruined," he moaned and began to sob as everything went black. "Ohhh, my head's ruined. Lord, I ain't ready! It ain't my time yet!"

Complete darkness dissolved to a floating airspace from which Moses watched pulsing emergency lights and urgent firemen, paramedics, and police in yellow rain slickers with reflective tape that glared like white fire. Flares hissed on wet pavement as a heavy cold rain fell, and voices were excited and loud and made no sense. It seemed people were yelling at him and it frightened Moses and made him feel small and ashamed. He tried to open his eyes, but it was as if they had been sewn shut.

"What happened to the angel?" he kept muttering. "She said her car broke down."

Unique's car was fine and she drove around downtown for a couple of hours, listening to radio newsbreaks about the mugging and hijacking at the Farmer's Market and the speculation that it had been committed by the same gang of highway pirates that had been terrorizing Virginia for months. But this time Unique enjoyed the afterglow a little less than usual. She could have sworn that old black truck driver was dead, and she was irritated that her accomplices had been in such a hurry to run off that they had robbed her of a complete release. Had it been up to her, she would have finished what she started and made sure the truck driver never talked again.

But she wasn't worried about cops paying her any mind as she cruised around in her white Miata at this strange hour. Part of being Unique was not looking like what she was. Part of being Unique was not looking at all like what she did. She was so certain of her invincibility that she pulled off at Fred's Mini Mart, where a police car was parked.

Unique could spot an unmarked car from a block away, and she slipped inside the store as she eyed the handsome young blond man who was paying for a quart of milk at the counter. He was wearing jeans and a flannel shirt, and she searched for any sign of a gun and detected a bulge at the small of his back.

"Thanks, Fred," the blond plainclothes cop said to the man at the cash register.

"You bet, Andy. I've missed seeing you. This whole last year, it's like you dropped off the damn planet."

"Well, I'm back," Andy said, pocketing his change. "You be careful. There's a really bad gang out there. We just had another truck driver hit."

"Yeah, no shit! Heard it on the radio. How bad did they mess him up? I guess you worked the scene."

"Nope. Off duty. I heard about it the same way you did," Andy replied with a trace of disappointment.

"Well, me-I agree with what the newspaper's saying about it being a hate crime thing," Fred said. "From what I hear, the leader's a white dude and all the victims so far are black, except for that female trucker a couple months back. But then, I think she was a minority, too, if you know what I'm saying. Not that I'm a big fan of dykes, but that was pretty horrible. Seems like I read somewhere she had a stick shoved up her and was cut . . . Oh!" Fred exclaimed, startled, as Unique appeared out of nowhere and set a six-pack of Michelob on the counter. "You slipped in so quiet, sugar, I didn't know there was nobody else in the store!"

Unique smiled sweetly. "I'd like a pack of Marlboros, please," she said in a small, soft voice.

She was very pretty and dressed neatly all in black, but her boots were scuffed and they sure were dirty, and she looked as if she had been caught in the rain. Andy noticed a white Miata in the parking lot when he got back in his unmarked Caprice, and he had scarcely driven off when the delicately lovely girl with the strange eyes climbed into the Miata. She followed him through downtown, all the way to the Fan District, and just as he slowed down to see if he could make out her license plate, she turned off on Strawberry Street. Andy had an odd feeling that he couldn't place, and as he returned to his small row house and fixed a bowl of cereal, he had the eerie sensation that he was being watched.

Unique knew how to stalk anybody, including a cop, and she stood across the street in the deep shadows of trees and watched Andy's shadow move from room to room eating something out of a bowl. Several times he parted the curtains and looked out at the vacant, still street. She cast her gaze in his direction and imagined the power she was having over his mind. He was feeling uneasy and sensed Something, she believed, because Unique had been around for a very long time and could trace her most recent possession back to Dachau, Germany, where she had been taken over by a male Nazi. Long before that-she had divined from tarot cards-she had been The Adversary and had eyes all over her body.

Andy parted the curtains again and by now was unsettled enough to carry his pistol everywhere he went inside his house. Maybe he was out of sorts because it really bothered him when a bad case went down, like Moses Custer, and Andy wasn't part of the investigation. It depressed and frustrated him to hear on the news that the trucker was kicked, stomped and beaten, and left for dead, and Andy hadn't been anywhere around to see things for himself and make a difference. Or maybe he was in a dark mood simply because he had been up all night and was excited and scared about what lay ahead.

Andy Brazil had been waiting for this day for an entire year. After endless hours of bone-aching work, he was at last launching his first installment of a special series of essays that in several hours would be posted on an Internet website he called Trooper Truth. The project was both ambitious and unlikely, but he had been quite determined when he first approached his boss about it inside her formidable office at Virginia State Police headquarters.

"Just hear me out before you say no," Andy had said, shutting her door. "And you've got to swear you'll never tell anybody what I'm about to propose."

Superintendent Judy Hammer had gotten up from her desk and been silent for a moment, looking like a publicity portrait of power as she stood in front of the Virginia and United States flags, her hands in her pockets. She was fifty-five years old, a striking woman with keen eyes that could penetrate body armor or empower a crowd, and her smart business suits could not hide a figure that Andy had to resist openly staring at.

"All right." Hammer had begun her characteristic pace around her office as she considered what Andy intended to do. "My first reaction is-absolutely not. I think it would be a big mistake to interrupt your law-enforcement career so soon. And I'll remind you, Andy, you were a cop in Charlotte for only a year, then a cop here in Richmond for only a year, and you've been a state trooper for barely six months."

"And during that time I've written hundreds of crime columns for area papers," he'd reminded her. "That's my most important accomplishment, isn't it? Hasn't your major agenda been to use me to inform the public about what's going on and what the police are doing about it or, in some instances, not doing about it? The whole point has always been to enlighten people, and now I want to do that in a bigger way and to a bigger audience."

Andy's was an unusual career and always had been. He'd gone into journalism right after college and had gotten involved in law enforcement as a volunteer, riding with police and writing eyewitness pieces for the city newspaper. This had been in Charlotte, North Carolina, where Hammer had been chief at the time, and she had eventually hired him as a sworn officer who enforced the law while continuing to write crime columns and editorials. Hammer had allowed him this unprecedented opportunity because she was in an unusual position, too, having been given a grant by the National Institute of Justice that allowed her to take over troubled police departments and straighten them out. She had always seen beyond boundaries and had become Andy's mentor, faithfully bringing him with her as she moved on in her career, but as he sat in her office and watched her pace, he sensed that his plan struck her as ungrateful.

"I appreciate everything you've done for me," he had said to her. "I'm not turning my back on you and disappearing."

"This isn't about my worrying that you're going to disappear," she had replied in a way that made him feel that if he vanished for months she wouldn't miss him in the least.

"I'll make it worth your while, Superintendent Hammer," he promised her. "It's time I have more to say than just who robbed who or how many speeders were caught or what's the latest crime wave. I want to put criminal behavior into the context of human nature and history, and I believe it's important, because people are only getting worse. Can you help me get a grant or something so I can pay my bills while I do the research and write and take flying lessons-?"

"Who said anything about flying lessons?" she had interrupted him.

"The aviation unit's got instructors, and I think I could be much more useful to you if I had my helicopter pilot's license," he'd explained.

Hammer let him have his way, perhaps because she realized he was going to leave her anyway. He could launch a website as a special, classified project while he continued to work for her, she said, but the condition was that he had to remain anonymous, because Governor Bedford Crimm IV, who was an aristocratic, autocratic, impossible old man, did not allow Hammer to disseminate information to the public without his approval. Clearly, whatever Andy wrote could not be directly connected to the Virginia State Police, but at the same time had to reflect favorably on it and encourage the public to support it. She had added that Andy had to be available for emergencies, and if he wanted to learn to fly, he could work that out on his own schedule.

He pushed his luck by asking, "Will I have a travel budget?"

"For what?" Hammer asked. "Where are you going?"

"I'll need funding for archaeological and historical research."

"I thought you were writing about human nature and crime." Hammer had begun to resist him again. "Now what? You're flying helicopters and globetrotting?"

"If I discuss what's wrong with America today, I need to show what was wrong with it when it got started," he'd explained. "And you need more pilots. You've already had two quit on you in the past three months."

--From Isle of Dogs by Patricia Cornwell, Copyright (c) October 2001, Putnam Publishing Group, a division of Penguin Putnam, used by permission.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 1.5
( 195 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(12)

4 Star

(11)

3 Star

(4)

2 Star

(9)

1 Star

(159)

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 195 Customer Reviews
  • Posted August 15, 2009

    Cornwell's disastrously failed effort

    I was intrigued and captivated by Cornwell's new character Andy Brazil when I discovered him in Hornet's Nest, and was pleased to have my liking confirmed in Southern Cross. But in Isle of Dogs, Cornwell has gone way off the deep end, turning the offbeat into the totally unrealistic and reducing all of the characters to cardboard caricatures. This is particularly grievous for the ones we had come to care about in the earlier books, who seemed real and human and could be identified with, even in improbable events and relationships. This book is way too long, too convoluted, too 'precious,' and tries too hard. It's virtually unreadable. Come down to earth, Cornwell.

    3 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 10, 2014

    One of the very few books I've begun & not finished. "B

    One of the very few books I've begun & not finished. "Black Humour" we're promised - "Utter Tripe" we receive. Cornwell is an excellent Crime Pathology writer - her foray into a different genre is woefully unreadable.
    No stars if it was an option!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted May 31, 2011

    Not sure what Cornwell was thinking

    If you love the Scarpetta series by Patricia Cornwell, you will NOT like this book. It almost reads like a parody of the Scarpetta series- like she was trying to be funny, but wasn't quite succeeding. An odd book to read, i really had to force myself to finish it.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 31, 2010

    Worst book I have ever read!

    I love the Scarpetta series so I thought I would give this a try. I am so sorry I wasted my time. I can never leave a book unfinished so I forced myself to finish this one. It never got any better.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 12, 2010

    Had to put it down.

    Could not get into it, boring/hard to follow. I have read better by Cornwell.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 1, 2010

    worse book ever

    I used to read all of Patricia Corwell books, but this one I had to force myself to finish it. After that I never picked up another of her books

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 21, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I thought I was the only one

    who thought this was less than Patricia's best effort.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 5, 2009

    She should have stuck to writing kiddie books

    I got about half way through this one and just had to stop. Its characters are about as deep as a tea spoon and each one of them sounds they are addressing a six year old. The tiny portion of the plot that made sense I didn't care about and I found myself simply waiting for it to end, when I realized my time would be better spent reading the back of a soup can.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 6, 2008

    I'm so thankful...........

    I'm so very thankful that this wasn't the first Patricia Cornwell book that I read because I would have never read another, thus would have missed out on some wonderful Cornwell novels. Was she actually trying to write a 'poor' book? Character development, which Cornwell is soooo good at, was all over the board - actually destroying the character of Andy Brazil and Judy Hammer completely! I'll stick to the Scarpetta series from now on.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 30, 2007

    Ratings should be 0 - 5!

    This book was totally atrocious. There was no character development and the plot (if that is what it can be called) was totally senseless. Trees should not be spared for these types of stories as I laboured through this book with forced interest. It is in my opinion a poor excuse for a book and should not even be in print. There should be a 0 rating for books of such poor quality. This is my first and last book by Patricia no matter how highly rated her other works are. What a let down Patricia!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 28, 2007

    What was she thinking?

    Good author, terrible book. She must have had a publisher's deadline to meet and was hard up for anything to write. Not at all like her other work which I have always enjoyed.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 20, 2006

    Laugh-out loud funny

    I also found this book to be hilarious. Maybe the other thumbs-up reader and I have the same warped sense of humor. I have now read all but two of Cornwell's books. I do prefer her Kay Scarpetta stories, but it's nice to know she can be funny, too. I did laugh out loud several times. People ARE as stupid as some of the characters in this book, I am sad to say, and I actually recognized a few as being strangely similar to former co-workers. I admit this book may not be everyone's cup of tea, but if you've got a sarcastic, dry sense of humor, you just may enjoy it!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 28, 2006

    Wish I had read the reviews first!

    This is one of the worst books I've ever slogged through. I bought it because the jacket blurb said it was dark humor, along the lines of Carl Hiaasen. I found nothing in it humorous, or even mildly entertaining. I think Ms. Cornwell should stick with the Kay Scarpetta series.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 12, 2005

    I'm Sorry I read this

    I love to read and once I start a book I have to finish. This was a very painful task. Half way through it a friend asked me 'how was it?' Knowing she is a fan I hated to tell her just how bad this book is so I told her ¿I¿m not really enjoying it.¿ She smiled and said, ¿Everyone I spoke to has said the same. ¿ This was the worst book I have read. Patricia Cornwell is an excellent writer so I just hope this doesn¿t turn to many fans away. I know it will be a while before I try another one of her books.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 20, 2005

    Couldn't Get Much Worse

    This is one of the worst books I've ever had the pleasure of laying down. I cannot believe how bad it was. Although I usually read all of a book that I'm not so sure about, this time I read to just over half before I finally couldn't take it any longer. I really enjoy Ms. Cornwell's Kay Scarpetta books, but this book was so far out in left field that I wondered what drugs the author might have ingested before coming up with this storyline. A man asked, when seeing me with this book at lunch one day, how it was. I had just started it and could only tell him it seemed strange. I wish I could find that man again so I could tell him -- do NOT read this book. I agree with some of the other reviewers -- I wish I could give this book ZERO stars as it certainly doesn't deserve even one!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 16, 2005

    Astonishingly Bad

    I read the reviews for this book after I bought it, but decided to give it a try anyway. I assumed that if I read it already knowing that it was nothing like the Scarpetta books, and that it was a dark comedy/satire that it would give me a different opinion than the other reviews. Not so. In fact, as everyone else has mentioned, this may be the worst book i have ever read. I feel dumber for having finished it. I strongly don't recommend this book.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 5, 2005

    How did this book get published

    I am just so glad that this book was not my first introduction to Patricia Cornwell. I never would have read all the fantastic Dr. Kay Scarpetta series of novels. Where the Isle of Dogs came from I don't know, but boy is it bad. It is mostly silly and fragmented. Even the main characters seem shallow and unheroic. Save your money for Cornwell's Dr. Kay Scarpetta books.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted July 20, 2012

    AWFUL

    I actually do understand dark humor, and this was not it. By far the dumbest book I have ever read. I felt bad for donating it to the library because I didn't want anyone else to endure the pain of reading this book like I did. It was a waste of money and a waste of time.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 6, 2007

    Entertained for our whole roadtrip!

    My husband and I make a 6 1/2-7 hr trip one way to visit family several times a year. We were given a PC book-on-tape several Christmases ago and got hooked, having now listened to all her books except the last two published (PREDATOR is 'on deck' for a trip this week). We found ISLE OF DOGS very entertaining (read by Kate Reading)! It is an over the top satire, and like another reviewer, I kept thinking there were enough weird characters and plots for a successful movie production. (Kate Reading is a master at interpreting PC's writings.....highly recommend her audios.)

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 30, 2006

    imaginative and outright funny

    seems as though this is a polarizing book--it inspires only love or hate. read it to see where you will line up.....!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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