Isn't It Pretty To Think So?

Isn't It Pretty To Think So?

3.1 13
by Nick Miller
     
 

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Set in Los Angeles, the novel follows Jake Reed, a world-weary recent college graduate struggling to find use for his liberal arts degree amidst a waning workforce. He eventually lands a job in real estate as a "Social Media Manager," a role that requires the mindless pursuit of likes, tweets, and hits.

After a death in the family and a surprise inheritance,

Overview

Set in Los Angeles, the novel follows Jake Reed, a world-weary recent college graduate struggling to find use for his liberal arts degree amidst a waning workforce. He eventually lands a job in real estate as a "Social Media Manager," a role that requires the mindless pursuit of likes, tweets, and hits.

After a death in the family and a surprise inheritance, Jake quits his job and meanders through lonely hotel rooms, quiet beach towns, and then, in a dramatic shift, stations himself in West Hollywood where disillusioned twenty-somethings lose themselves in the madness of drugs and sex. It is here that the only proof of memories is found in filtered photographs posted online from the night before.

Miller captures the angst, restlessness, and spirit of the Millennial Generation -- a group mindlessly charging through the recession during a time when the line between existence in the physical and digital world is blurred. The novel provides a fascinating, grim, and often times humorous portrayal of the lifestyle that represents our contemporary youth.

Editorial Reviews

Amazon - Walter Martens
It has been said that Hemingway came as near as anyone to describing the hopes, angst, and lifestyle of his generation in their youthful early adulthood following World War I, at least as far as the expat set in Paris was concerned. The same argument can be made for Miller's attempt at capturing a particular generation (the Millennials) at a particular moment in history (following the economic meltdown of the late aughts).
Amazon - Rebecca Pilling
Jake is the quintessential 20-something coping with post-collegiate, twenty first century life. His life is a barrage of social media, photographs, smart phones, cyber-relationships and disconnect from the people physically around him. Any ties made between two people are superficial and vapid, lacking any true depth or affection. Miller's assessment of our generation is quite accurate and his appreciation of a less-than-electronic was refreshing.
Amazon - Jason Shough
The book is timely and relevant. It contains thought-provoking commentaries on modern life's most challenging puzzles -- notably, the incongruity between how we present ourselves in digital and physical form. On this topic, Miller writes one of the rawest, most cutting passages I have ever read on the concept of "self" in the age of Facebook. It is required reading for anyone who has ever thought about these kinds of things.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940015471915
Publisher:
Fernando French Publishing
Publication date:
08/29/2012
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
390
Sales rank:
594,261
File size:
1 MB

Meet the Author

Nick Miller studied English at the University of California, Berkeley. He currently lives in Southern California.

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Isn't It Pretty to Think So? 3.2 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 13 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is a story of a twenty-three year old aspiring writer, Jake Reed, who is dwindling away on isolated beaches and in lonely hotel rooms in Southern California, while he wonders what's wrong with his life, why he feels so disconnnected, and why he can't sleep or seem to find happiness. At the start of the novel, Jake is presently living with an immigrant Ukranian girl, Tatiana (a victim of being illegally trafficked into the US for the purposes of prostitution). Miller weaves a melodic tale full of introspection, thoughts and reveries as Jake, after a dealth in the family, decides to quit his meanliness job and takes a year off to travel. Jake heads to the heart LA where he meets a crazy, interesting cast of characters, and, in the process, tries to learn something, anything, about himself. I taste Murakami. I get a hint of Salinger. I detect a wiff of Eugenides. But it all comes together in a style that becomes uniquely Miller's as he carries you on a journey of loss, tragedy, love, music, heartbreak, social media, sex, drugs, literature, meaning and relationships. A novel that makes you think about modern life today. I couldn't put it down.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Perhaps it's the fact that I am so busy that I barely have any time to read a book all the way through these days, but I find Miller's novel astoundingly interesting 
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This was a nice not-so-little clever read about some kid that has no life, but a bit of cash and tries unsuccessfully to find a life. Nick Miller is not the next coming of anyone and really needs to lighten up a bit.
Kinch More than 1 year ago
This is an egregiously pretentious and sophomoric attempt at a novel. If you really are a fan of Hemingway (or Salinger, or any other of the famous names dropped throughout this book), you will be infuriated by the woeful immaturity of this book, both in style and substance. A waste of $.99 and a couple of hours.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
That review on June 28 was spot on.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I kept waiting for this book to have a point - slogged through all the way to the end (yes, I know - if it was so bad, why did I keep reading?). Don't waste your time on this drivel.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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