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ISSA: The Greatest Story Never Told
     

ISSA: The Greatest Story Never Told

4.1 7
by Lois Drake
 

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The Bible explicitly records the life of Jesus, with one exception-his life between the ages of 13 and 30. Yet, ancient Buddhist scripture records the life of Saint Issa, which astoundingly parallels the life of Jesus of Nazareth. ISSA is a story of Jesus's life during the missing years, his journey through Asia, the power within he had to master and the tests of

Overview

The Bible explicitly records the life of Jesus, with one exception-his life between the ages of 13 and 30. Yet, ancient Buddhist scripture records the life of Saint Issa, which astoundingly parallels the life of Jesus of Nazareth. ISSA is a story of Jesus's life during the missing years, his journey through Asia, the power within he had to master and the tests of the heart he had to pass before he could change the world.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781932890051
Publisher:
Summit University Press
Publication date:
08/25/2009
Edition description:
Original
Pages:
224
Product dimensions:
6.00(w) x 8.90(h) x 0.90(d)

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Issa: The Greatest Story Never Told 4.1 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 7 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Snow Mountain Press is owned by Summit University Press, which usually publishes inspiring, truth-based books on practical spirituality and esoteric teachings. Drake's fiction pulls the company into the "anything goes" fantasy-fiction arena and you have to wonder why they bothered. Elizabeth Clare Prophet's book on "The Lost Years of Jesus," which must have inspired Drake, is historically interesting and invites you to tune in to the youthful Jesus through your own heart and imagine what he and his life might have been like. While Drake's novel does offer fascinating information about the Kushan empire, the mystical teenage "Issa" (Jesus) she created is a sometimes brooding, wooden character who can be surprisingly condescending towards his peers, especially his traveling pal, the teenage Kushan prince. Mixing truth and spirituality with fiction and fantasy is always tricky, but assigning personality traits and moments of imaginary adolescent angst to an historical religious figure, like Jesus, crosses the line of artistic and spiritual license.
FrancescaFB More than 1 year ago
Lois Drake tells a story of a teenager from Galilee who travels to a far off land to the east with Joseph of Arimethia in order to avoid Roman scrutiny and persecution. He uses the name Issa. The reader should keep in mind that this is a novel, a fictitious story which is very lightly-based upon some historical manuscripts. If the evidence contained in ancient Tibetan manuscripts do indeed mention Jesus and His location during the lost years of the Bible, then we have a new insight into the influences that helped form the adult Jesus. His missing years of the Bible are interesting to discover. If He did travel to India, Tibet, and the eastern regions, and He did study these religions and spiritual meditations, then we are more enlightened in the understandings of His teachings--and how Jesus became the spiritual leader as we know Him from the Bible.
Wyn More than 1 year ago
This was an interesting story. Jesus (Issa) as a teenager is taken by Joseph of Arimathea to India out of the view of the Romans. There they join with other members of The Order of Melchizedek (Genesis 14:18-20; Hebrews 6:20; 7:1-3), one the wisemen Casper, a King and a teacher; and 3 other teenagers. It is decided that the 4 teenagers will travel across India and Tibet with the teacher and learn about Buddhism and Hinduism. The story is about their travels and what they learn about spirituality and themselves. I learned quite a bit about how the different religions lined up with Judaism. A neat idea incorporated by the author was Jesus learning to meld the stories and tell them to the poor people so that they could understand them ~ a precursor to the parables. Very interesting, easy to read.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
HelenBeaufort More than 1 year ago
In her first published novel, ISSA: The Greatest Story Never Told, Lois Drake has created a work of religious historical fiction worthy to grace any spiritually-minded person's bedside table. While it's inspired by Elizabeth Clare Prophet's research presented in The Lost Years of Jesus, the author has gone beyond the bare bones of the documented information to imagine an entire story of Jesus' youth - the so-called "missing years" of the Bible. In doing so she manages to weave in an abundance of spiritual teachings and truths as they are encountered and understood by the characters in the novel - Jesus (Issa) and his family, the young Prince Vima Kadphises and his father King Taktu, the prince's friend Sanum, Joseph of Arimathea and his servant Awa, the wealthy warlord Panum Sri Bashir, and many others. Against the backdrop of warfare and the expansion of the Kushan empire in the East, and under the watchful protection of the ancient Order of Melchizedek, Jesus and his friends make their way across India and the Himalayas on a quest of spiritual learning as they seek the guru - Maitreya, "the Coming Buddha". Throughout ISSA, spiritual teachings are touched upon in a way that enhances the flow of the novel, and are more often than not an integral part of the plot. I noted the presence of karma, twin flames, spiritual testing, dharma (mission), Hinduism, Buddhism, inner attunement, heart-centeredness, handling emotions, black magic (focused misuse of energy), miracles, conquering our own dark side, sacrifice, and discerning/following God's Will. The story flows almost seamlessly from one event to another, somehow covering a period of many years in 218 pages without making me feel lost. I was completely absorbed into the characters' lives and world, and was pleasantly surprised to find myself at the end of the story without having had any desire to put the book down during reading. I have seen the book referred to as young adult fiction, probably because of the ages of the main characters, and while I'm sure teens and young adults would enjoy it, I'd lean more towards the categorisation on the back cover of the book - inspirational fiction - as I believe any spiritually-inclinded or open-minded person has a lot to gain from it. As a novel, ISSA has all the right pieces and it's gripping enough to keep you riding the waves. As a spiritually inspiring book, it's thought-provoking enough to allow you to tune into a time and place where the people are God-focused and striving to better oneself is the norm. For that "tap on the shoulder" reminder alone, I am personally grateful. http://www.spiritual-encyclopedia.com/issa-the-greatest-story-never-told.html
MasterR More than 1 year ago
"Issa, the Greatest Story Never Told", is historical fiction and should be understood as that. But, if we can enjoy, learn and make ourselves a better person by reading this book than we owe it to ourselves and Jesus to do so. I suggest the reader will greatly benefit and truly enjoy reading this book. Issa allows a window of opportunity to know Jesus better than we did before. It is an inspiring and interesting read that should be read by all that want to understand and feel closer to Him. Read the book and decide.