Issues in the Conservation of Paintings

Overview


This volume on paintings conservation includes more than seventy texts ranging from the fifteenth century to the present day. Some are classic and highly influential writings; others, although little known when first published, in retrospect reflect important themes and issues in the history of the field. Many appear here in English for the first time, including translations of D. Vicente Polero y Toledo's 1855 essay "Arte de la Restauración" (The Art of Restoration), and Victor Bauer-Bolton's treatise from ...
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Overview


This volume on paintings conservation includes more than seventy texts ranging from the fifteenth century to the present day. Some are classic and highly influential writings; others, although little known when first published, in retrospect reflect important themes and issues in the history of the field. Many appear here in English for the first time, including translations of D. Vicente Polero y Toledo's 1855 essay "Arte de la Restauración" (The Art of Restoration), and Victor Bauer-Bolton's treatise from 1914, "Sollen fehlende Stellen bei Gemälden ergänzt werden?" (Should Missing Areas of Paintings Be Made Good?).
The book is divided into six sections: An Historical Miscellany, History of the Profession, Study of Artists' Materials and Techniques, Structural Interventions, Philosophical and Practical Approaches to Cleaning and Restoration, and Cleaning Controversies.
This is the second volume to appear in the Getty Conservation Institute's Readings in Conservation series, which publishes texts considered fundamental to an understanding of the history, philosophies, and methodologies of conservation.
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Meet the Author

David Bomford is senior restorer of paintings at the National Gallery, London. Mark Leonard is conservator of paintings at the Getty Museum.

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Table of Contents

1 Memoirs 2
2 On the restoration of The circumcision by Signorelli 3
3 Instructions for the restoration of a painting by Rogier van der Weyden 4
4 Lives of the illustrious Netherlandish and German painters 5
5 Rubens's mission to Spain in 1603 7
6 Notes on cleaning 9
7 The mellowing effects of time 11
8 The destructive effects of time 12
9 Advice on the restoration of the Spanish king's paintings 14
10 Letter to the Gentleman's magazine 16
11 Comments on restoration 18
12 Report on the work of a Spanish restorer 20
13 On the preservation of pictures 22
14 On Turner's recent works 24
15 Edgar Degas and his restorer 26
16 Letters to his restorer 28
17 The aesthetics of restoration 30
18 On conserving Rembrandt's paintings 32
19 Comment on a painting by Abbott Thayer 34
20 An accidence, or gamut, of painting in oil and water colours 38
21 On the restoration of the royal paintings of Venice 46
22 Report from the Select Committee on the National Gallery 59
23 Dirt and pictures separated, in the works of the old masters 69
24 The cleaning of old paintings 73
25 The cleaning of paintings : problems and potentialities 82
26 History of restoration 102
27 Who needs a conservator? 118
28 The display of paintings in public galleries 124
29 The art of painting in oil and in fresco 138
30 Preservation of pictures 147
31 Volpato manuscript : preliminary observations 154
32 Venetian methods 158
33 Ultra-violet rays and their use in the examination of works of art 164
34 Art criticism from a laboratory 172
35 The preparation and study of paint cross-sections 185
36 The technique of the "Flemish primitives" 194
37 Magilphs and mysteries 207
38 Rembrandt : the painter at work 216
39 Polite arts 224
40 On the modes of strengthening panels by Ledges or Battens 232
41 Hand-book for the preservation of pictures 235
42 The transfer of an oil painting from a panel onto canvas 245
43 The lining cycle 249
44 Relining of easel oil painting with sturgeon glue 267
45 The first transfer at the Louvre in 1750 : Andrea del Sarto's La Charite 275
46 Of mending and cleaning pictures and paintings 292
47 The art of restoration 299
48 Restoration of the paintings of the Louvre 317
49 Manual for the painter-restorer 326
50 The idea of the perfect restorer 331
51 On oil paint and the conservation of painting galleries using the procedure of regeneration 339
52 Should missing areas of paintings be completed and what would be the best way to do so? 358
53 The aesthetic and historical aspects of the presentation of damaged pictures 370
54 The idea of patina and the cleaning of paintings 391
55 The crucifix by Cimabuc 396
56 Long lost relations and new found relativities : issues in the cleaning of paintings 407
57 Some picture cleaning controversies : past and present 426
58 The first cleaning controversy at the National Gallery, 1846-1853 441
59 Antipathy to picture restorations 454
60 Interview with George Lance 462
61 Restoration of the paintings of the Louvre : response to an article by Mr. Frederic Villot 473
62 "Restoration" : the doom of pictures and sculpture 483
63 Storm over Velazquez 492
64 An exhibition of cleaned pictures 498
65 Dark varnishes : variations on a theme from Pliny 507
66 Dark varnishes - some further comments 519
67 Crimes against the cubists 531
68 "Crimes against the cubists" : an exchange 539
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