It's a Sprawl World After All: The Human Cost of Unplanned Growth -- and Visions of a Better Future [NOOK Book]

Overview


Suburbia has twisted the American dream into a nightmare. The United States now has the most rapes, assaults, murders, and serial killings per capita, by a wide margin, than any other first-world nation. It’s a Sprawl World After All is the first book to link America’s increase in violence and the corresponding breakdown in society with the post-World War II development of suburban sprawl.

Without small towns to bring people together, the unplanned growth of sprawl has left ...

See more details below
It's a Sprawl World After All: The Human Cost of Unplanned Growth -- and Visions of a Better Future

Available on NOOK devices and apps  
  • NOOK Devices
  • Samsung Galaxy Tab 4 NOOK
  • NOOK HD/HD+ Tablet
  • NOOK
  • NOOK Color
  • NOOK Tablet
  • Tablet/Phone
  • NOOK for Windows 8 Tablet
  • NOOK for iOS
  • NOOK for Android
  • NOOK Kids for iPad
  • PC/Mac
  • NOOK for Windows 8
  • NOOK for PC
  • NOOK for Mac
  • NOOK for Web

Want a NOOK? Explore Now

NOOK Book (eBook)
$10.49
BN.com price
(Save 41%)$17.95 List Price

Overview


Suburbia has twisted the American dream into a nightmare. The United States now has the most rapes, assaults, murders, and serial killings per capita, by a wide margin, than any other first-world nation. It’s a Sprawl World After All is the first book to link America’s increase in violence and the corresponding breakdown in society with the post-World War II development of suburban sprawl.

Without small towns to bring people together, the unplanned growth of sprawl has left Americans isolated, alienated, and afraid of the strangers that surround them. Suburbia has substituted cars for conversation, malls for main streets, and the artificial community of television for authentic social interaction. This has resulted in dramatically negative impacts on US society, including:

• The transformation of America’s community-oriented small-town sensibilities into an isolated society of strangers burdened by isolation, loneliness, and depression
• The emergence of a culture of incivility characterized by extreme individualism and a callous disregard for others
• Levels of violence so rampant as to be proclaimed “epidemic” by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

Advocating that urgent attention be paid to managing development by emulating the smart growth examples of European cities, the book’s final section offers readers tools to rebuild community in their lives as well as in society at large. It offers practical solutions that can improve everyone’s quality of life.

Provocative and thoughtful, It’s a Sprawl World After All also includes a helpful resource listing of organizations committed to making communities more sustainable.

Douglas E. Morris is a freelance writer whose 14 years of experience living outside the United States in a number of safe urban areas has given him unique insights into cross-cultural urban comparisons. He has published numerous articles on the topic in the last seven years.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781550923216
  • Publisher: New Society Publishers
  • Publication date: 3/1/2009
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 288
  • File size: 2 MB

Meet the Author


Douglas E. Morris is a freelance writer specializing in travel guides. His 14 years experience of living outside the U.S. in a number of safe urban areas have given him unique insights into cross-cultural urban comparisons, and he has published articles on the topic for the last seven years.
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews
  • Posted February 4, 2010

    I Also Recommend:

    LocalPlan.org Review

    Sprawl is the nightmare of the urban planner manifested after decades of poor planning in the United States. We have lost control of the places that we inhabit and struggle to find a renewed sense of community. Douglas Morris, author of It's a Sprawl World After All acknowledges this loss of community, and examines the many facets of what sprawl has taken away from United States society. Rather than dwelling on the history of sprawl or wasting time with laying blame, Morris launches directly into an examination of the problems that sprawl is associated with and how we can fix them.

    Morris presents a very compelling argument regarding the reasons urban sprawl is an undesirable force in our land development patterns. He moves beyond traditional arguments relating to increased infrastructure costs and increased environmental degradation and explains how sprawl affects us at a social level. The information presented links sprawl to a plethora of negative externalities including increased crime rates, incivility, and distance in personal relationships. He reinforces the argument that sprawl is inhibiting our ability to function as social creatures.

    Instead of simply advocating that we raze our sprawling cities and start over again with vibrant downtowns and small villages, Morris offers solutions relating to how we can cope with sprawl. It's a Sprawl World After All removes our ability to become complacent victims of sprawl and places the impetus on us to become champions for better communities. Morris presents an empowering view of the problem that allows us to move forward in reality rather than aimlessly hoping that sprawl will vanish.

    From an institutional perspective, It's a Sprawl World After All also offers a variety of suggestions on how we can prevent further sprawl. These suggestions move beyond draconian changes to land development regulations and instead propose a more holistic set of changes that would cause us to re-envision the way we live. The appendix summarizes the changes that helped to encourage sprawl in the first place and allows the reader to understand how those changes might be reversed in order to inspire livable communities.

    This book is an excellent read for anyone interested in urban planning and community development because it combines the work of professional urban planners with the actions of citizens and illustrates how combined efforts can yield the types of robust communities that we desire to live in.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 27, 2005

    Parris N.Glendening Governor 1995-2003 & President, Smart Growth Leadership Institute

    'This book is controversial, but a must read. Many studies are available that quantify problems of our sprawl development pattern. It's a Sprawl World After All centers on the least quantifiable, but arguably, the most important impact &#8209 the loss of a sense of community. The author gives a hard-hitting warning that must be heeded if we are to have a civil future.'

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 29, 2005

    From Sam Horn, author of Tongue Fu!

    Are you increasingly shocked by people's impolite behavior? Do you ever feel unsafe walking alone, even in your own neighborhood? If so, this book is for you. Morris shows how sprawl has reduced our overall quality of life and turned neighbors into strangers. Most importantly, he offers practical suggestions on how readers can create meaningful, fulfilling connections in their communities -- regardless of where they live. Read it and reap the benefits. ¿ Sam Horn, author of Tongue Fu! and Take the Bully by the Horns

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 22, 2005

    Regaining our senses and spirit.

    'Mr. Morris's new book, It¿s a Sprawl World After All reveals a litany of frightening details about America¿s failing economic, community and personal health all tied to the unbearable auto dependency associated with our suburban and urban wasted places. As Director of Walkable Communities it has become abundantly clear to me that where we live impacts our soul, spirit and optimism. As a people and as communities we require a collective thump on the noggin. We need to rethink how we are building our nation. This book helps us do that.¿ ¿ Dan Burden, Director, Walkable Communities

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 4, 2005

    Review by Richard Moe, President of National Trust and author of Changing Places

    Sounding an impassioned call to action and offering thoughtful, common sense suggestions for repairing the damage we have inflicted on our landscape and our way of life, Morris has given us a useful addition to the growing body of anti-sprawl literature.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing all of 5 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)