It's Alive!: How the New York Post Reinvented Tabloid America

Overview

Cuozzo writes with anecdotal wit of his experiences at the nation's oldest continuously published daily newspaper, founded in 1801 by Alexander Hamilton. His story begins in 1972, when he debuted as a copyboy and The Post was still Dorothy Schiff's respectable but flagging liberal afternoon paper. When Rupert Murdoch became the once and future proprietor in 1977, he immediately infused the pages with energy, reenvisioning their politics, their prose, their sensibility. Call it loud, call it brassy, but the ...
See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (19) from $1.99   
  • New (2) from $42.49   
  • Used (17) from $1.99   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$42.49
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(1)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
New We ship daily with FREE tracking! 100% Guarantee on all products. Brand new hardcover with dust cover! Stated first edition. Copyright 1996. Binding and pages tight. Pages ... crisp, clean, unmarked. Shelf wear to cover. Packaged with care. Money back if not completely satisfied. #112. Read more Show Less

Ships from: Mishawaka, IN

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$105.00
Seller since 2014

Feedback rating:

(149)

Condition: New
Brand new.

Ships from: acton, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

Cuozzo writes with anecdotal wit of his experiences at the nation's oldest continuously published daily newspaper, founded in 1801 by Alexander Hamilton. His story begins in 1972, when he debuted as a copyboy and The Post was still Dorothy Schiff's respectable but flagging liberal afternoon paper. When Rupert Murdoch became the once and future proprietor in 1977, he immediately infused the pages with energy, reenvisioning their politics, their prose, their sensibility. Call it loud, call it brassy, but the reinvented Post became "the engine of the shift in the popular imagination" that drove the renewal of America's healthy tabloid culture. It's Alive! is also the inside account of how the paper became a tabloid saga in itself. Its will to live was remarkable. In 1987, when Murdoch lost his battle with the FCC to own both The Post and six television stations, his first tenure on South Street came to an end, precipitating the paper's first brush with death. What lay ahead was a "harrowing five-year parenthesis in The Post's rightful ownership." Under new owner Peter Kalikow, the paper was soon locked in the aftermath of the 1987 stock market crash and a death-duel with the archenemy Daily News. In fits and starts, The Post ground its way into 1993, bouncing checks and praying for credit. When Kalikow, in personal bankruptcy, announced suspension of publication, mystery man Steven Hoffenberg at first appeared to be a savior. But with his own assets frozen by a federal court, Hoffenberg faced travails worse than Kalikow's. Desperate for credibility and cash, he brought in literary legend Pete Hamill as editor, and parking garage magnate Abraham Hirschfeld as a partner. Hirschfeld wrested control, dumped Hamill for controversial Amsterdam News publisher Wilbert Tatum, and announced a far-fetched plan to "combine" the two papers. Cuozzo tells the riveting - and hilarious - story of how executives and union members alike banded together to oust Hirschfeld from the sc
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
If only Cuozzo, executive editor of the New York Post, had kept to his mandate to the first half of his subtitle. As a veteran of the tabloid since 1973, he presents an anecdotal history as only an insider can, with verve and detail. But beneath his tale of big stories, crusty characters and the newspaper's roller-coaster ride under a succession of owners (notably Peter Kalikow, the loopy Abe Hirshfeld and Rupert Murdoch), Cuozzo must strenuously justify the Post. "Employing humor and the common touch, it broke the elitist media stranglehold on the national agenda," he declares at the outset. While he remarks accurately that the paper has always been "a partisan organ," he sees little irony in feeding the paper's working-class readers a diet of harsh conservatism and upscale gossip. Of course, he has nothing critical to say about Murdoch, who rescued the paper in 1993. Readers who wonder how a brilliant headline like "Mayflower Madam" came about will find some of Cuozzo's stories worth repeating. But those who lament the tabloidization of American journalismTV is now the culprit, Cuozzo notesmight not find the author's defenses convincing. (July)
Kirkus Reviews
Executive editor Cuozzo offers a surprisingly dignified, un-Post-ian memoir of his paper's fight for survival and the tabloidization of the American media.

In March 1993 the ailing New York Post was fighting for its life. With the end in sight, Cuozzo pulled out all the stops: "We might be dead, world—but oh, baby, they'll remember how we went out! And if we're gonna die after 192 years, damn it, we're gonna rock!" With this bitchin' battle cry, he and a ragged editorial staff coopted the Post's own pages to fight the bankruptcy court that had awarded its ownership to a "buffoon": The tabloid of Alexander Hamilton and Pete Hamill had been passed on to Abe Hirschfeld, a builder of open-air parking lots and Manhattan's Vertical Club gyms. The Times applauded the staff's brassy, pungent rebellion. It had taken a long time to get a good review from the traditional journalistic establishment. Thirteen years earlier, the Columbia Journalism Review had called then-owner Rupert Murdoch's in-your-face tabloid a "force for evil." Cuozzo, who started at the Post as a copy boy in 1972, recounts its journalistic life under five different owners, focusing on Murdoch and real estate entrepreneur Peter Kalikow, who both operated the paper, says Cuozzo, as a symbol of their manhood. From the more sedate remove of his features department, Cuozzo celebrates the testosterone-filled newsroom. He tells how Murdoch brought in Aussie and Fleet Street brawlers and turned longtime owner Dorothy Schiff's "stodgy" liberal paper into the newspaper that humanized the news and "put the nation back in touch with itself." Cuozzo mixes essays on the virtues of tabloids with colorful Post-iana, including the paper's famous headlines (500-lb. sex monster goes free) and its fierce take-no-prisoners rivalry with the New York Daily News.

Cuozzo's is the account of an affable management mensch. It's a great story, but it might be fun to read a spicier version, one as thoroughly uninhibited as the newspaper it celebrates.

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780812922868
  • Publisher: Crown Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 6/18/1996
  • Pages: 342
  • Product dimensions: 5.81 (w) x 8.58 (h) x 1.14 (d)

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)