It's All About the Dress: What I Learned in Forty Years About Men, Women, Sex, and Fashion
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It's All About the Dress: What I Learned in Forty Years About Men, Women, Sex, and Fashion

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by Vicky Tiel
     
 

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Vicky Tiel started as an "it" girl of the 1960s and has had a four decade career designing clothes that make real women look fabulous. Her sexy, fresh hot pants and miniskirts were used by Woody Allen in his first movie, What's New, Pussycat?, her classic design inspired the red dress that transformed Julia Roberts in Pretty Woman, and her creations

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Overview

Vicky Tiel started as an "it" girl of the 1960s and has had a four decade career designing clothes that make real women look fabulous. Her sexy, fresh hot pants and miniskirts were used by Woody Allen in his first movie, What's New, Pussycat?, her classic design inspired the red dress that transformed Julia Roberts in Pretty Woman, and her creations are worn today by stars such as Halle Berry and Kim Kardashian. Tiel's own life has been dance-the-night-away fun, from her earliest days flunking out of Parsons to design on her own, to starting a chic boutique with best friend Mia Fonssagrives in Paris, from marrying MGM's top make-up man to becoming Elizabeth Taylor's dear friend and part of her longtime entourage. Tiel forged her own path, and picked up some distinctive and hard-earned lessons from the rich, famous and celebrated along the way.

In IT'S ALL ABOUT THE DRESS, you'll get a glimpse of what it's like to be Hollywood royalty (think yachts, tiny dogs, giant pearls and peanut butter sandwiches washed down with Chateau Margaux), discover the seduction secrets of the greats (from Kim Novak to Goldie Hawn to Warren Beatty), take in a little husband-hunting advice, and even learn legendary model Dorian Leigh's recipe for gigot d'agneau sept heures.

Vicky Tiel will teach you to dress like a sex symbol , cook like the owner of a French country inn, and seize what you want from the world like an American ingénue.

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Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

“Not even the most resolutely stern reader will be able to resist this feast of Hollywood gossip, fashion advice and racy recollection by the noted designer Vicky Tiel, who knew Marilyn and Marlon, was the inventor of notable trends like miniskirts and jumpsuits, and is a natural and funny writer who tells all. Delicious!” —Diane Johnson, author of Le Divorce

“A naughty girl when that was the best a girl could be, inventor of the mini, Paris couturier at 18, Vicky Tiel tells spicy tales from dressing Kim, Ursula and Miles Davis, teasing Woody Allen, staying up late with Princess Grace and more intimate tales than you thought you'd want to know from her years in the entourage of Liz and Dick. Comes complete with tricks you need: bedroom advice, supermodels' diet guide, how to get men to give jewelry and the recipe for a perfect pink tuna fish sandwich.” —Gael Greene, author of Insatiable: Tales from a Life of Delicious Excess.

“A delicious romp...her memoir reads like all of the juiciest bits of your favorite gossip magazine, pushing back the curtains of an over-the-top life among the who's who of the '60s-'80s.” —Kirkus Reviews

“If you have not been frolicking throughout Europe and Hollywood with the rich and famous this summer, dive into the memoir of fashion designer and bon vivant Vicky Tiel… Reading her stories is a grand time all on its own.” —Wall Street Journal

“Growing up in the suburbs of Detroit, I remember reading an article in Life magazine about two girls who graduated from Parsons School of Design in New York and moved to Paris, where Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton opened a boutique for them. This fantasy fueled my dream. Dreams can carry a person farther than anything else. Vicky Tiel was my original inspiration!” —fashion designer Anna Sui

“The original purveyor of the miniskirt and Elizabeth Taylor's caftan unravels fabulous, chatty tales…By turns nutty and tender, she offers priceless anecdotes about Liz and Richard, Romy Schneider and Alain Delon, Woody Allen, Warren Beatty, hippies, and dating married men.” —Publishers Weekly

author of Insatiable: Tales from a Life of Del Gael Greene

A naughty girl when that was the best a girl could be, inventor of the mini, Paris couturier at 18, Vicky Tiel tells spicy tales from dressing Kim, Ursula and Miles Davis, teasing Woody Allen, staying up late with Princess Grace and more intimate tales than you thought you'd want to know from her years in the entourage of Liz and Dick. Comes complete with tricks you need: bedroom advice, supermodels' diet guide, how to get men to give jewelry and the recipe for a perfect pink tuna fish sandwich.
This British sci-fi tale invites you to visit a Victorian London that would baffle and astonish Sherlock Holmes. In this Jules Verne–worthy realm, Queen's agent Sir Maurice Newbury and his fetching assistant, Miss Veronica Hobbes, are charged with thwarting miscreants who use science and the supernatural to achieve their ends. In The Affinity Bridge, Newbury and Hobbes must confront mysteries involving a crashed airship, a missing automaton pilot, a glowing serial killer, and a zombie plague. All in a day's work in this entertaining steampunk detective novel.
Publishers Weekly

SF editor Mann (The Solaris Book of New Science Fiction) sets this leisurely mystery, published in the U.K. by Snowbooks in 2008, in an alternate 1901 London where steam-powered taxicabs fill the streets and brass automatons have begun to replace human labor. Sir Maurice Newbury, British Museum anthropologist and occult connoisseur, and his Watsonesque assistant, Miss Veronica Hobbes, are summoned to investigate the crash of a cyborg-piloted helium zeppelin. Meanwhile, a plague is spreading through London's poorer quarters, turning everyday citizens into bloodthirsty, zombielike "revenants" and threatening the stability of the Empire. Mann's stiff-upper-lipped Victorians chat at great length over cups of Earl Grey and occasionally whack zombies and robots in arduous action passages, and the unnecessary details and painfully stilted dialogue bring nothing fresh to the steampunk subgenre. (July)

Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
Library Journal

In this intriguingly bizarre version of 1901 London, Sir Maurice Newbury, ostensibly an academic, is a trusted agent of the Crown. The ailing Victoria charges him and his assistant, Veronica Hobbes, with discovering the cause of an airship crash, which may be linked to innovative automata now acting as servants all over London. Meanwhile, Scotland Yard is dealing with numerous strangulations perpetrated by a glowing policeman and an outbreak of a "revenant plague" that turns people into mindless, murderous zombies. Readers should not be put off by the introduction of several apparently unrelated investigative threads; Mann brings them together and ratchets up the action as the story progresses. VERDICT Although the imagery is occasionally repetitive and some loose ends are tied up rather abruptly, overall, this series launch by the editor of The Solaris Book of New Science Fiction is a strong addition to the "steampunk" subgenre and one that creates a lively alternative world.—Sara M. Schepis, East Fishkill Community Lib., Hopewell Jct., NY


—Sara M. Schepis
School Library Journal
Adult/High School—In this steampunk mystery, Sir Maurice Newbury maintains an office at the British Museum but actually works in a secret capacity for Queen Victoria, who is still alive, in late 1901, by means of an elaborate mechanical life-support system. Veronica Hobbes arrives to become Sir Maurice's assistant, and together the two investigate a series of incidents: a missing man, a crashed airship, automatons gone berserk, a string of murders apparently committed by a blue-glowing policeman, and a plague that is turning residents of London's Whitechapel into revenants (zombies). Mann may be trying to do a little too much here, but both Newbury and Hobbes are engaging characters and the world-building is done well. The last third of the novel is nonstop action, including a classic train-top chase scene. The author introduces some elements that are obviously intended to carry over into future books, and the epilogue reveals new information and clearly sets up the next episode. Fast-paced and well-written, this novel is likely to appeal to genre fans.—Sarah Flowers, formerly at Santa Clara County Library, CA
Kirkus Reviews
Steampunk series opener and first U.S. appearance for this U.K.-based writer and editor of various anthologies. In 1901, Sir Maurice Newbury, a British Museum researcher otherwise employed as an agent of Queen Victoria, investigates such supernatural oddities as the rash of mysterious strangulations in and around Whitechapel, attributed by witnesses to a weirdly blue-glowing policeman. But then Victoria, kept alive only by various steam-powered life-support devices, personally assigns him to look into a ghastly airship crash. With his young, smart, feminist assistant, Veronica Hobbes, and old friend Chief Inspector Sir Charles Bainbridge of Scotland Yard, Newbury inspects the site of the crash, a vast, odoriferous pile of twisted metal, burned rubber and charred corpses. Oddities swiftly emerge. The passengers were tied into their seats (this may or may not have something to do with the plague currently ravaging the Empire that turns its victims into cannibal zombies). The pilot, a highly advanced brass robot guaranteed infallible by its manufacturers, is missing from the wreckage. Unfortunately, at this point, Sherlock Holmes pastiche threatens to take over, what with Newbury's Holmesian weakness for drugs and Bainbridge's Lestrade-like ineffectuality. Seething melodrama set against a vividly imagined backdrop; what's missing is a thematic center.

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781250009043
Publisher:
St. Martin's Press
Publication date:
08/07/2012
Edition description:
First Edition
Pages:
336
Sales rank:
869,038
Product dimensions:
5.40(w) x 8.20(h) x 1.00(d)

Meet the Author

VICKY TIEL began designing clothes forty years ago and is the longest surviving female designer in Paris. Her signature dresses - designed to make women look and feel great with their curves - have been sold exclusively in Bergdorf Goodman and Neiman Marcus for the past thirty years and worn by everyone from Elizabeth Taylor to Goldie Hawn, Halle Berry and Kim Kardashian. Tiel writes about style and culture for The Huffington Post. She divides her time between Paris, New York and a Florida farm where she live with her husband.

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