It's Not the Glass Ceiling, It's the Sticky Floor: And Other Things Our Daughters Should Know about Marriage, Work and Motherhood

Overview

Originally written as a guide to her daughters, this book is Karen Engberg's answer to the great questions created by liberation. Engberg issues an urgent call for women to negotiate equality in the home and for men to understand that motherhood and "housework" are just as important as breadwinning. "The ability to spot-treat stains, remember who doesn't like brownies with nuts, memorize the baby-sitter's number, and remember that toilet paper is needed even when it's not on the grocery list, involves talents ...
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Overview

Originally written as a guide to her daughters, this book is Karen Engberg's answer to the great questions created by liberation. Engberg issues an urgent call for women to negotiate equality in the home and for men to understand that motherhood and "housework" are just as important as breadwinning. "The ability to spot-treat stains, remember who doesn't like brownies with nuts, memorize the baby-sitter's number, and remember that toilet paper is needed even when it's not on the grocery list, involves talents residing in the twilight zone of human accomplishments. These skills do nothing for a resume but are essential to civilized survival. Then your husband comes home from work and wonders what you've been doing all day." Welcome to the motherly vocation of what Engberg labels the "Small Stuff Technician."

In pithy and hard-hitting chapters, using hilarious and hair-raising personal experiences, Engberg challenges the studies and assertions of "experts" who fail to address family issues in realistic, or realizable, terms. She offers fresh points of view and advice for women on youthful decision-making, motherhood, what to expect from husbands and fathers, domestic duties, parenting, handling teenagers, finance, and much more.

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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Writing originally for her own daughters, physician Engberg looks at how the explosive entry of women into paid work has impacted housekeeping. She advises women to think carefully about balancing home and career, but most urgently insists that they train their husbands to recognize the importance and complexity of raising a family and to engage in it as fully as they do. She includes no index or bibliography. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781573927451
  • Publisher: Prometheus Books
  • Publication date: 12/28/1999
  • Pages: 200
  • Product dimensions: 5.62 (w) x 8.38 (h) x 0.63 (d)

Meet the Author

Karen Engberg, M.D., a physician whose practice focuses on women and children, writes a weekly parenting column for the Santa Barbara News-Press, a monthly child health column for the Philadelphia Inquirer, and occasional medical commentary for the Los Angeles Times.
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Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 15, 1999

    Feminism revisited

    Dr. Enberg makes it undeniably clear that the feminist movement waged and won only half the battle: women are now considered seriously for every conceivable job, (except perhaps Pope). The other half of the battle...solving the issues of home and family...makes winning the war tenuous. Her insights are dead-on accurate: the 'sticky floor' is the silent magnet pulling women out of the fast career track. Her writing is intelligent, but readable and humorous. You will want to love and kick your husband, and think about what partnering really should be all about. Today's women have a long way to go to educate and prepare the next generation of daughters and granddaughters for challenges that are uniquely women's: the glass celing and the sticky floor.

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