It's Superman!

Overview

The world's most popular and enduring super hero and acclaimed novelist Tom De Haven come together to create the extraordinary It's Superman!a novel that reinvents the early years of the Man of Steel. Opening with the young Clark Kent on a date, the novel takes an entirely fresh approach to the emergence of his superpowers and the start of his newspaper career, following him from rural 1930s Kansas across america to Hollywood in its golden age, and then to New York City. He meets a worldly Lois Lane and conniving...

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Overview

The world's most popular and enduring super hero and acclaimed novelist Tom De Haven come together to create the extraordinary It's Superman!a novel that reinvents the early years of the Man of Steel. Opening with the young Clark Kent on a date, the novel takes an entirely fresh approach to the emergence of his superpowers and the start of his newspaper career, following him from rural 1930s Kansas across america to Hollywood in its golden age, and then to New York City. He meets a worldly Lois Lane and conniving political boss Lex Luthor, and begins his battles against criminal masterminds, mad scientists, and supervillains inspired by fascists. Sure to appeal to fans of the TV show Smallville and the novel The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay, as well as devoted comic book readers, It's Superman is a fun and fast-paced novel of thrilling invention, heroic escapades, ill-fitting costumes, and super-sized coming-of-age angst.

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Editorial Reviews

The New York Times Book Review
"The cartoon world of "It's Superman!" is often as delightful as the original created by Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster. Colors, sounds and emotions are exaggerated to great, infectious effect, so that when Superman is sent hurtling through the air by an explosion, we thrill to the ride. "It's Superman!" may be short on allegorical truths, but the smart money says De Haven's cartoon world will entertain readers for a long time to come."
Josh Emmons
Colors, sounds and emotions are exaggerated to great, infectious effect, so that when Superman is sent hurtling through the air by an explosion, we thrill to the ride. It's Superman! may be short on allegorical truths, but the smart money says De Haven's cartoon world will entertain readers for a long time to come.
— The New York Times
Publishers Weekly
A focus on Clark Kent's high school years only makes comparison to the popular WB show Smallville all the more inevitable-and intentional. De Haven, whose Derby Dugan trilogy beautifully reimagined 20th-century American history through a pleasant sheen of media-tized irony, presents the man of steel as a sullen Depression-era teen, a bad WII-era reporter and as ambivalent about his super powers throughout, all with a kind of knowing that reflects a deep immersion in pulp. De Haven drives his coming-of-age tale toward Superman's first showdown with Lex Luthor and his robot "Lexbots" in the middle of (the real!) New York City-prompted, of course, by the need to save Lois Lane. He gets knocked off his feet by the Lexbots and temporarily dazed. He doesn't want to continue, doesn't think he can win. Suddenly, in an echo of recent Batman and Spiderman film adaptations, a disembodied voice rings out: "Now get off that silly chair and go do something. Doesn't matter what. Just do something, Clark." (It's his mother.) If that's not over-the-top enough, plenty of short chapters begin with lines like "Despite Lex Luthor's savvy and sensitive draft report on the Harlem race riot...." De Haven gives readers X-ray vision for determining when his tongue is in his cheek here; using it is great fun.(Nov. 1) Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.
Publishers Weekly

Scott Brick gives a super performance in his reading of this revisionist telling of the Superman legend. Set in the 1930s, De Haven's Superman is not the stalwart do-gooder of the comics. He's just a simple, decent guy, with all the faults and doubts of any young man coming of age during the Great Depression. It just so happens he can leap buildings in a single bound, bend steel with his bare hands..., etc. His journey from Smallville to Hollywood then New York City, where he meets Lois Lane, and his arch nemesis Lex Luthor makes for a rich, multilayered novel. From Brick's enthusiastic reading of the book's title, which is reminiscent of the old Saturday morning serials, it is clear that he fully embraces this material. Brick smoothly handles the novel's descriptive passages, loaded with historical and pop culture references to create an authentic sense of time and place. His characterizations are spot on, whether it's the arrogant smugness of Luthor, the shy, polite stammering of farm boy Kent or the plucky assertiveness of Lois Lane, Brick shines throughout. This is an audiobook not to be missed. Ballantine paperback (Reviews, Sept. 26, 2005). (Jan.)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information
KLIATT - Nola Theiss
Based on the often-retold story of Superman, this modern novel focuses on the adolescence and early manhood of Clark Kent as he first comes to terms with his super powers. Considering how well known Superman's story is to most Americans, who have grown up with the comic books, the movies and the TV series, De Haven is able to bring originality, wit and insight to the story. He creates an empathetic character in Clark Kent, gives even more pepper to the saucy Lois Lane character we all know, makes Lex Luthor even more brilliant and more evil than we've come to expect, and adds a number of other well drawn friends and enemies to surround the main characters. Perhaps the best part of the story is the author's recreation of America in the 1930s, from Kent's hometown of Smallville to New York City, which sheds its thin disguise of Metropolis. There is enough action to fill a video game, but the reactions of the characters, especially Clark Kent, are what make this a great read. For YAs who can expand their reading insights from the comics to this well-written satire/adventure/period piece of contemporary literature.
Kirkus Reviews
The formative years of the Man of Steel, in a rib-tickling melodrama set in Depression-era America. De Haven's knowledgeable assimilation of U.S. pop culture (displayed in such memorable entertainments as Funny Papers (1985) and Dugan Under Ground (2001) is well-suited to the familiar comic-book tale of Kansas farm kid Clark Kent's loving relationship with his adoptive parents, astonished discovery of the superpowers embedded in "his puzzling, uncomfortable, intimidating body" and gradual acceptance of his role saving the world from malefactors while disguised as a mild-mannered, slightly geeky newspaper reporter. De Haven skillfully juggles parallel narratives, shifting among Clark's attention-getting early heroics (e.g., catching a speeding bullet in midair), Lois Lane's rapid climb up the big-city journalism ladder (interrupted by romantic friendships, one with Polish-American photographer Willi Berg, whose path also crosses Clark's) and criminal mastermind (A)lex(ander) Luthor's ascent to prominence as NYC alderman and evil genius whose plans to control the world involve deploying a fleet of semi-indestructible robots. Shades of Fritz Lang's Metropolis, then, as well as the comics' world of cartoonish overkill. De Haven gradually brings Clark out of Kansas, as he rides the rails across America, discovers his humanity (and vulnerability) along with his ability to fly, encounters perpetually endangered Lois (later his reluctant colleague at the Daily Planet) and resists the criminal blandishments of Lex Luthor (who, in a wicked biblical parody, attempts to seduce our hero by promising, "I'll give you the world"). There's a little too much of everything here-stalwart public servants,sleazy underworld goons, greedy and murderous molls. But the narrative excess is irresistible, and De Haven anchors it resonantly in Clark's fears "that he's not quite genuine, that he's a made-up character in a story."Comic noir with a super-keen edge, in De Haven's best book yet.
From the Publisher
De Haven's Derby Dugan trilogy Funny Papers, 1988; Derby Dugan's Depression Funnies 1996; Dugan under Ground, 2001 presaged Michael Chabon's Amazing Adventures of Kavalier and Clay (2000) and outdid it by encompassing the history of comics from early newspaper strips to the undergrounds of the sixties. De Haven now undertakes an authorized re-imagining of the early years of Superman. De Haven convincingly and touchingly depicts the young Clark Kent's apprehensions and insecurities as he comes to terms with his extraordinary abilities in 1930s rural Kansas. Concurrently, he tracks Lois Lane's beginnings in journalism and the plotting for power of New York City political boss Lex Luthor (no "Metropolis" masquerade here). While hewing to the basic outline of the venerable Superman mythos his intergalactic background, his straight-arrow upbringing in Smallville, and his blue-and-red costume De Haven finds ways to make even its more outlandish elements work. If it doesn't quite transcend its origins, De Haven's novel shows that, nearly 70 years after his creation, the Man of Steel still has plenty to offer. -Booklist

A focus on Clark Kent's high school years only makes comparison to the popular WB show Smallville all the more inevitable and intentional. De Haven, whose Derby Dugan trilogy beautifully re-imagined 20th-century American history through a pleasant sheen of media-tized irony, presents the Man of Steel as a sullen Depression-era teen, a bad WWII-era reporter and as ambivalent about his super powers throughout, all with a kind of knowing that reflects a deep immersion in pulp. De Haven drives his coming-of-age tale toward Superman's first showdown with Lex Luthor and his robot "Lexbots" in the middle of (the real!) New York City prompted, of course, by the need to save Lois Lane. He gets knocked off his feet by the Lexbots and temporarily dazed. He doesn't want to continue, doesn't think he can win. Suddenly, in an echo of recent Batman and Spiderman film adaptations, a disembodied voice rings out: "Now get off that silly chair and go do something. Doesn't matter what. Just do something, Clark." (It's his mother.) If that's not over-the-top enough, plenty of short chapters begin with lines like "Despite Lex Luthor's savvy and sensitive draft report on the Harlem race riot..." De Haven gives readers X-ray vision for determining when his tongue is in his cheek here; using it is great fun. -Publishers Weekly

The formative years of the Man of Steel, in a rib-tickling melodrama set in Depression-era America. De Haven's knowledgeable assimilation of U.S. pop culture (displayed in such memorable entertainments as "Funny Papers" 1985 and "Dugan Under Ground" 2001) is well-suited to the familiar comic-book tale of Kansas farm kid Clark Kent's loving relationship with his adoptive parents, astonished discovery of the superpowers embedded in "his puzzling, uncomfortable, intimidating body" and gradual acceptance of his role saving the world from malefactors while disguised as a mild-mannered, slightly geeky newspaper reporter. De Haven skillfully juggles parallel narratives, shifting among Clark's attention-getting early heroics (e.g., catching a speeding bullet in midair), Lois Lane's rapid climb up the big-city journalism ladder (interrupted by romantic friendships, one with Polish-American photographer Willi Berg, whose path also crosses Clark's) and criminal mastermind (A)lex(ander) Luthor's ascent to prominence as NYC alderman and evil genius whose plans to control the world involve deploying a fleet of semi-indestructible robots. Shades of Fritz Lang's "Metropolis," then, as well as the comics' world of cartoonish overkill. De Haven gradually brings Clark out of Kansas, as he rides the rails across America, discovers his humanity (and vulnerability) along with his ability to fly, encounters perpetually endangered Lois (later his reluctant colleague at the <

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780345496751
  • Publisher: Random House Publishing Group
  • Publication date: 1/25/2011
  • Format: Mass Market Paperback
  • Pages: 464
  • Sales rank: 442,903
  • Product dimensions: 4.10 (w) x 6.80 (h) x 1.20 (d)

Meet the Author

Tom De Haven is the author of eight novels, including the Derby Dugan trilogy, hailed a wild ride" by the Boston Globe and "brimming with life and characters" by the New York Times Books Review. A frequent contributor to Entertainment Weekly and the New

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Sort by: Showing all of 18 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 18, 2008

    A superb re-imagining of the Superman myth

    DeHaven's novel is superb: the best version of the Superman myth available. Setting his novel during the Depression (during the very years that Cleveland teenagers Joe Shuster and Jerry Siegel created Superman), DeHaven draws from the American culture of the time, recreating a gritty and totally believable setting for his story. The novel begins in Kansas in the mid-30's, where teenaged Clark Kent lives with his parents--and with an intense, painful self-awareness that by nature he is very different from other human beings. Smallville is a poor rural community on the Kansas plains through whichJohn Dillinger/Bonnie & Clyde-like criminals pass, and in which biogtry and racism are the norm. After series of crimes and the death of his mother, Clark is forced to flee--hitting the roads with a New York City newspaper photographer--who is fleeing the mob. The two make their war across the United States to LA and then eastward to New York City (aka, 'Metropolis') The novel also follows the life of Lois Lane--the head strong daughter of a World War II military officer who has moved to New York to pursue a career in journalism (and a life that includes Jazz, liquior and live-in boyfriends.) A third storyline concerns Lex Luther--the New York City official with underworld connections. This story line is as gritty,realistic and entertaining as 'The Godfather' or 'The Untouchables.' The three story lines--Clark Kent's, Lois Lane's and Lex Luther's--finally come together in the last quarter of the novel, and what emerges is the classic Superman myth with which we are all familiar. What is fascinating is the journey on which DeHaven takes the reader. DeHaven knowledge of everything from the films, the movies, the pulp magazines and popular culture of the 1930's is impressive and he shows how these cultural influences effect Clark, Lois, Lex and the extended cast of characters. In short the reader comes away realizing that Superman was a product of the American/Depression-era mind that he could not have emerged during any other time period. Aside from all of this, what elevates the novel artisically is it's focus on Clark's inner-battle to come to term with his human-nature--or his supposedlack of it. The final chapter in which Clark and Lois spot one another at the 1938 Broadway opening night of Thorton Wilder's 'Our Town' is--to put it simply--beautiful and moving. While comic books are certainly an art form to be appreciated on their own merits, and while super-heroes constitute what could be called the modern American pantheon, 'It's Superman' transforms the Superman myth into literature. If one knows nothing about Superman, and if one never sees a movie, TV show, graphic novel or comic book devoted to the character, 'It's Superman' will still provide a thought-provoking memorable reading experience.

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 7, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    I Also Recommend:

    A small Superman story without being villain magnet.

    Tom De Haven takes us to pre-50's America. Clark Kent is far more interesting here and Tom delivers the 1930's accurately. This was a Batman Begins for me; the slate is clean and I can enjoy Superman without up-the-ante super-villains. The author is omniscient and deals with every character fairly, delivering them close up for inspection; a real joy to hear them speak and sense their motivations.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 18, 2008

    A reviewer

    Extremely well written and fascinating 'what if' look at the origins of Superman. The strength of the book were not the characters you already knew -- Clark, Lois, or Lex -- but the cast of original characters that fleshed out not only the story but the entire universe. This is the Silver Age Superman re-conceptualized for the real world (killer robots notwithstanding).

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 6, 2007

    '...THE LAST SATURDAY OF MAY 1935....'

    For everyone who has ever read a comic book here's a story you must hear. Tom De Haven's brilliant imagining of the early years of the iconic man of steel begins with 'Our version of the story opens on the last Saturday of May 1935 with the arrival of Sheriff Bill Dutcher at the police station in Smallville, Kansas.' For most that year, 1935, brings to mind the Depression and the attendant gloom, hopelessness that settled over our country. Times were especially tough in Kansas where a young farm boy, Clark Kent, watched as the once fertile earth turned dry. Oh, they can still make a living but it's a meager one. However, like maMy high school boys Clark is swept up in personal problems - maintaining his grade average and wondering about himself, the things that make him different. Life is almost the opposite in New York for Columbia student Lois Lane. She has a boyfriend, photographer Will Berg who soon finds himself accused of murdering his pawnbroker. He's innocent, of course, but has been framed by villainous politico Lex Luthor. Innocent or not Will is forced to run and who should he meet as he skedaddles across the country? Of course, Clark. What a pair they are as they crisscross the U.S. Clark learns a lot from his more sophisticated pal but not quite enough to prepare him for New York City, the tempting Lois Lane, and the challenges of leading a double life. Author De Haven mirrors a Depression ravaged America with painterly accuracy and engenders smiles as Clark comes to terms with who he is and what he might accomplish. Highly recommended. - Gail Cooke

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 25, 2007

    A reviewer

    this has almost no tie-ins to the origanal plot. I felt it was a true waste of my money. who is this Willie guy and clark isnt that depressed. But for someone who doesnt live and breathe Superman like me i say go ahead

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  • Posted February 2, 2009

    more from this reviewer

    THE MAN OF STEEL TELLS ALL

    For everyone who has ever read a comic book here's a story you must hear. Tom De Haven's brilliant imagining of the early years of the iconic man of steel begins with 'Our version of the story opens on the last Saturday of May 1935 with the arrival of Sheriff Bill Dutcher at the police station in Smallville, Kansas.' For most that year, 1935, brings to mind the Depression and the attendant gloom, hopelessness that settled over our country. Times were especially tough in Kansas where a young farm boy, Clark Kent, watched as the once fertile earth turned dry. Oh, they can still make a living but it's a meager one. However, like many high school boys Clark is swept up in personal problems - maintaining his grade average and wondering about himself, the things that make him different. Life is almost the opposite in New York for Columbia student Lois Lane. She has a boyfriend, photographer Will Berg who soon finds himself accused of murdering his pawnbroker. He's innocent, of course, but has been framed by villainous politico Lex Luthor. Innocent or not Will is forced to run and who should he meet as he skedaddles across the country? Of course, Clark. What a pair they are as they crisscross the U.S. Clark learns a lot from his more sophisticated pal but not quite enough to prepare him for New York City, the tempting Lois Lane, and the challenges of leading a double life. Author De Haven mirrors a Depression ravaged America with painterly accuracy and engenders smiles as Clark comes to terms with who he is and what he might accomplish. What more can be said about voice performer Scott Brick? He has garnered every professional honor - 18 Earphone Awards, an Audie Award for best science fiction, and an AudioFile magazine Golden Voice award. He expertly carries us through the coming of age and coming out of one of the most popular comic heroes of all time. Highly recommended. - Gail Cooke

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  • Anonymous

    Posted June 27, 2006

    Excellent, even topical, treatment of an American monomyth

    First disclaimer: When people ask who I like better, Superman or Spiderman, I usually pick Spiderman. Second disclaimer: I have been a cultish follower of De Haven's books for about fifteen years. For my money, this is his best work. No spoilers here, but this is the Super-Backstory: How Clark Kent grows up. How Lois Lane grows up. How Lex Luthor gets bald. That much has been done before in comics, graphic novels, movie and TV serials, Smallville, etc. One of the reasons it keeps getting done is that a flying bulletproof guy, once you get over the initial surprise, is only so interesting. For the same reason we read People and watch Entertainment Tonight, we want to know how the flying bulletproof guy got that way. And who he's dating. And so on. With this book, instead of Entertainment Tonight, think History Channel. The Depression, when Superman was created, was a time of tremendous injustice, not just poverty. Young Clark witnesses some terrible things and, in one of the best parts of the book, uses his super powers to correct them in a predictable juvenile way. De Haven is the perfect writer to capture the story of Superman's early days. He was approached about writing the book in 1996, but was then working on his well-received 'Derby Dugan' trilogy, which involves a family of comic strip writers in the 1930's. D.C. waited, and DeHaven accepted the assignment in 2001. DeHaven provides rich details of the time. As always, he has a tremendous ear for dialogue. His Superman is real, and the plot gripping. Superman fans, and anyone who enjoys fine writing or a terrific yarn, will enjoy this book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted February 22, 2006

    This really isn't Superman

    In the wake of 'The Adventures of Kavalier and Klay,' I suppose it was only inevitable that we would soon see a Chabon-like effort using one of the actual characters dating from the late 1930s. Batman being a little too removed and exposed these days, Wonder Woman being, well, a woman with a fantastic mythological origin, and Captain America being too militaristic (or at least military- oriented) for some, I guess we come down to that most American of icons, the Everyman every man physically aspires to, Superman. Except that this isn't the Superman Jerry Siegel and Joe Shuster wrote so greatly of. I suppose it's fashionable nowadays, especially in the comics realm after 'Watchmen' and 'Dark Knight Returns,' to give your heroes feet of clay -- a temper, sexual problems, inadequacies, etc. What no one seems to realize, however, is that when the 'grim and gritty' style was applied, it never worked with Superman. Superman IS a paragon, that's why they call him super! Self-doubt, fumbling words, unsureness of action...Superman never exhibited these. Even as Clark Kent, he only appeared to be an oaf to protect his secret identity -- you never got the impression that he really WAS an oaf. George Reeves (and to some extent Christopher Reeve) got that exactly right. Tom DeHaven, though, in countless examples, didn't. He makes both Kent AND Superman into an oaf...and in the end, you wonder why you should care so much about this character to begin with. Following that thought, the line between Clark Kent and Superman was something the character so jealously guarded that he wouldn't reveal himself to anyone, let alone his great love Lois...so why did DeHaven find Willi Berg, a character who doesn't exist in the comics, necessary to include as being in on things? This was a misfire. The other problem I brought up before was about showing a hero's sexual problems. Well, I know adult relationships existed long before the Sexual Revolution of the 1960s, but I honestly don't think, even in big cities, that being as loose as Lois Lane and some of the other female characters in this book was the rule rather than the exception. In the early comics, Lois came off as headstrong, and brash, but never lascivious, or the type you'd think would jump into bed with a man at any second. If anything, you'd swear she never needed a man, in fact never needed sex, because she was so dedicated to ruling the journalistic world. Truthfully, I have always found it conundrum enough to wonder why Superman would even be attracted to someone like Lois, especially when he had the good-natured and sweet hometown girl Lana Lang around. Why he'd want to love someone as shrill and shrewish as Lois Lane, especially the Lois of this novel (whom his 'best pal,' Willi Berg, already bedded, no less) is a mystery, one which this novel does nothing to explore. What saves this book from being a one-star is exactly what others have talked about: the richness of the American landscape. DeHaven is at his best here when describing the swathes of Kansas, the sprawling American Southwest, the newly-burgeoning Hollywood, and the confines of New York City. (Which, incidentally, he still could've called Metropolis, it wouldn't have hurt anything.) Dropping the names of celebrities famous in the 1930s but near-forgotten now also lent this work the verisimilitude DeHaven was aiming for but didn't quite achieve. Finally, unrelatedly, I give full props to the author for getting almost every other character right, from the too-little-explored Soda Wauters (read 'Etta Candy' if you're a Wonder Woman fan) to the sublimely-vicious Lex Luthor. Lex's selfish villainy drives this book as effectively as Gene Hackman's thinly-veneered evil drove the second half of the first Superman movie to great effect. While I can't quite see why Lex w

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 25, 2006

    Tom Joad as Superman

    What makes this retelling of the Superman myth distinct is its period detail and unremarkable patience. DeHaven has rendered a Man of Steel beset, like the rest of America in the 30's, by the Great Depression. You don't need xray vision to see the literary allusions to 'The Grapes of Wrath' and 'Of Mice and Men,' as 19-year-old Clark Kent and his defacto best friend, misplaced Willi Berg, make their way across the Dust Bowl, to Hollywood, then to New York (DeHaven wisely chose to preserve the novel's veneer of plausibility by using NYC, and not a fictional Metropolis). Despite the single-bound-leaping pace, the author takes his time leading Clark to his destiny, and the story is the better for his restraint. The ultimate compliment for the book, I would think, would be that one need not be a comics fan at all to enjoy it.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 3, 2005

    One of the best takes on the Superman mythos

    Over my 30 years of reading comics I have seen and read many interpretations of the Superman mythos.With the novel It's Superman by Tom Dehaven comes one the purist and best interpretations I have ever read. This isn't the Superman of today but the Superman of the Golden Age of comics as invisioned by Seigel and Shuster. This is the Superman of the Depression Era and a world soon to be on the brink of it's second world war. In this novel we see a young Clark Kent as his powers emerge. All Clarks wants to do is fit in, to be human. As his powers grows he finds himself at a crossroad. What does he do with these powers? Should he help people? If he does then how will he live a normal life? The novels starts in 1935 and ends in 1938. In those 3 years we see Clark's power grow as he leaves Smallville and travels across the Depression torn United States. Also we learn of Lois Lane and Lex Luther who both are on a road with destiny with the Man Of Steel. Tom Dehaven has perfectly captured the Golden Age Superman. With the novel we see a man destined(Like the Clark of Smallville TV series) for greatness but not sure he is worthy of that destiny. And Mr.Dehaven writes Clark not as the confident hero but a young man who is unsure of who he is and where he belongs in the world. Another great thing about this novel it is steeped in history. Mr Dehaven shows a what the world was like in the Depression Era as if he was there himself. Especially of smalltown America. I was drwann into the story from his description of not just the time period but his characterization of Clark, Clark's father & mother Lois, Luther and all the other characters that grace this novel. This is a novel a fan of any era of comics can enjoy. Or if you just watch Smallville.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 29, 2005

    Slow start

    Not too many people love superman the way I do. I have '3' tatoos 2 of the logo and one of him flying they way he looked in the 60's.The story stars very slow with clark growing up and then clark nor Suerman is in the story until 3/4 of the way in . then it starts to get good. I just wish that superman stays in thoughout the book thats why I give it 3*s

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 29, 2005

    anyone can enjoy

    I was never a big comic book fan. I know the character of superman and the myth associated with him and was intrigued to see what Tom DeHaven did with the story. It is a fresh take on the series. I am a big fan of this book and would recommend it to anyone who is a fan of great novels. You do not have to be a comic book lover to enjoy this book.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 25, 2005

    release date

    it,s superman is already out in bookstores, it came out 2 weeks ago. I have not read the book yet.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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    Posted September 26, 2010

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    Posted December 24, 2009

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    Posted October 26, 2008

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    Posted October 26, 2008

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    Posted January 8, 2010

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