I've Had It Up to Here with Teenagers

I've Had It Up to Here with Teenagers

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by Melinda Rainey Thompson
     
 

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“For years and years of relatively smooth-sailing childhood, my kids followed my directives,” writes Melinda Rainey Thompson. “If I said, ‘Let’s go swimming!’ they fled down the hall to pull on their swimsuits, shedding their clothes along the way. If I said, ‘So sorry, the mall is closed today,’ they didn’…  See more details below

Overview

“For years and years of relatively smooth-sailing childhood, my kids followed my directives,” writes Melinda Rainey Thompson. “If I said, ‘Let’s go swimming!’ they fled down the hall to pull on their swimsuits, shedding their clothes along the way. If I said, ‘So sorry, the mall is closed today,’ they didn’t doubt my pronouncement for a moment—even if the parking lot was crammed.”

And now that her kids are mostly grown?

“I was good with babies. Teenagers—not so much,” Thompson admits. “I don’t get many hugs anymore. Any I do get are inevitably instigated by me while they stand there like martyrs tied to a stake. Recently, when I was the rare recipient of a spontaneous hug from my seventeen-year-old, I got so excited I dropped the basket of chocolate-chip muffins in my hands. I was anxious to hug back while it was still on offer. It was totally worth the muffin loss.”

Thompson’s three teenagers bury her under an Everest of laundry. They send her for groceries so often that she once heard a store employee cry, “Incoming!” They leave such a quantity of half-eaten sandwiches around their rooms as to provide a buffet for roaches. They complain for hours about 10-minute chores. They spend their parents’ money like it magically regenerates and hoard their own like it’s the last dose of the elixir of life.

To put it another way, they’re typical teens.

In her inimitable style, Thompson makes I’ve Had It Up to Here with Teenagers both a humorous rant against teens and a celebration of seeing them rise from the ashes of battle to become well-adjusted, responsible humans. “Parental love is fierce and illogical,” she writes. “I think it is the strongest force on earth. It trumps everything, thank God: sleepless nights, hard stadium seats, endless recitals, broken hearts, losing seasons, throw-up viruses, bad grades, poor choices, and everything else life throws at teenagers and their parents.”

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
2940013906143
Publisher:
Blair, John F. Publisher
Publication date:
02/29/2012
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
166
File size:
336 KB

Meet the Author

Melinda Rainey Thompson will always be “from” the small town of Greenville, Alabama, even though she lived in Birmingham for the twenty-five years and now resides in Homewood, Alabama. She has an undergraduate degree in English from Tulane University, where she was a Kappa Kappa
Gamma, and an MA in English from the University of Alabama at Birmingham. She was a member of Birmingham-Southern College’s English faculty from 1988 to 1994. In August 1999, Melinda began writing and publishing The SWAG Letter, which continued for the next four years. Since then, she has published two books of her essay collections: SWAG: Southern Women Aging Gracefully (2006) and The SWAG Life (2007). Her first book, SWAG, graced the SIBA best-seller list for 17 weeks in a row. I Love You--Now Hush (cowritten with Morgan Murphy) was a 2010 ForeWord Reviews' Book of the Year winner and a 2011 Benjamin Franklin Award finalist, both in the Humor category.

Melinda is married to Bill Thompson, a judge on Alabama’s Court of Civil Appeals. They have three children (Warner, Nat, and Lily), 10 fish that were supposed to die by now, and an 18-year-old cat that refuses to go into the light.

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