Ivor Horton's Beginning Visual C++ 2005

Overview

  • Popular author Ivor Horton uses his trademark approachable writing style to provide novice programmers with the basic tools as they learn Visual C++ 2005
  • Readers will learn how to program in C++ using Visual C++ 2005-without any previous knowledge of C++
  • More than 35 percent new and updated material covers the new release of Visual C++, and exercises and solutions help readers along the way
  • Demonstrates the ...
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Overview

  • Popular author Ivor Horton uses his trademark approachable writing style to provide novice programmers with the basic tools as they learn Visual C++ 2005
  • Readers will learn how to program in C++ using Visual C++ 2005-without any previous knowledge of C++
  • More than 35 percent new and updated material covers the new release of Visual C++, and exercises and solutions help readers along the way
  • Demonstrates the significant new features of Visual C++ 2005, providing improved flexibility in developing Microsoft applications in C++
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780764571978
  • Publisher: Wiley
  • Publication date: 2/20/2006
  • Series: Programmer to Programmer Series
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 1224
  • Product dimensions: 7.34 (w) x 9.20 (h) x 2.15 (d)

Meet the Author

Ivor Horton is one of the preeiminent authors of tutorials on the Java, C and C++ programming languages. He is widely known for the tutorial style of his books, which provides step-by-step guidance easily understood even by first-time programmers. Horton is also a systems consultant in private practice.
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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments.

Chapter 1: Programming with Visual C++ 2005.

Chapter 2: Data, Variables, and Calculations.

Chapter 3: Decisions and Loops.

Chapter 4: Arrays, Strings, and Pointers.

Chapter 5: Introducing Structure into Your Programs.

Chapter 6: More about Program Structure.

Chapter 7: Defining Your Own Data Types.

Chapter 8: More on Classes.

Chapter 9: Class Inheritance and Virtual Functions.

Chapter 10: Debugging Techniques.

Chapter 11: Windows Programming Concepts.

Chapter 12: Windows Programming with the Microsoft Foundation Classes.

Chapter 13: Working with Menus and Toolbars.

Chapter 14: Drawing in a Window.

Chapter 15: Creating the Document and Improving the View.

Chapter 16: Working with Dialogs and Controls.

Chapter 17: Storing and Printing Documents.

Chapter 18: Writing Your Own DLLs.

Chapter 19: Connecting to Data Sources.

Chapter 20: Updating Data Sources.

Chapter 21: Applications Using Windows Forms.

Chapter 22: Accessing Data Sources in a Windows Forms Application.

Appendix A: C++ Keywords.

Appendix B: ASCII Codes.

Index.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 3, 2008

    Not for the beginner.

    Programming examples should be more simple for the beginer. Eg: use of variable/object/class names that will confuse a beginer. Too much mathematics in examples. You spend more time fiquring out how the mathematics formular is coded into the program, than learning the topic at hand. For example page 280. I needed to learn throwing and catching exceptions, not how many time in minutes it takes for a machine to make a part - based on how many parts it made in an hour. This example include static_cast, arrays and loops. In closing, I picked up a book from the author Herbert Shildt and the example was simple as 1,2,3. Straight to the point...

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