J-Tull Dot Com

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Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Patrick Little
With 1995's Roots to Branches, Jethro Tull signed a sixth lease on life by absorbing the ethnic sounds of India and the Middle and Far East. Ian Anderson was camouflaging his failing voice with fluting that was better than ever and with songs which suited his singing range. Jethro Tull follows up Roots to Branches with j-tull Dot Com, a title which advertises both the band's new Web site and Anderson's newfound Internet prowess. The band has made a career of blending rock with jazz, blues, classical, and folk, and it would seem that the globe-trotting Roots to Branches, along with Anderson's solo album from the same year Divinities: Twelve Dances with God, would point to...
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08/24/1999 CD Extra tracks New Factory sealed! Complete packaging. Fast shipping & friendly Midwestern service!

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Editorial Reviews

All Music Guide - Patrick Little
With 1995's Roots to Branches, Jethro Tull signed a sixth lease on life by absorbing the ethnic sounds of India and the Middle and Far East. Ian Anderson was camouflaging his failing voice with fluting that was better than ever and with songs which suited his singing range. Jethro Tull follows up Roots to Branches with j-tull Dot Com, a title which advertises both the band's new Web site and Anderson's newfound Internet prowess. The band has made a career of blending rock with jazz, blues, classical, and folk, and it would seem that the globe-trotting Roots to Branches, along with Anderson's solo album from the same year Divinities: Twelve Dances with God, would point to a full-time obsession with world music. But now the band abandons some of the world sounds in favor of songs that are more straight-forward and lacking in variety, and unlike Roots to Branches, j-tull Dot Com fails to excite with the first listening.

While not as memorable as the previous effort, the album still delivers standard Jethro Tull: Anderson's flute, Martin Barre's crunchy guitar, and the wide-reaching keys of Andrew Giddings support Anderson's ever-weakening voice, which he imposes onto every song. Once again Tull's capable hard rock is alternately ornamented, twiddly and heavy handed, so after repeated listenings Tull fans should be satisfied.

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Product Details

  • Release Date: 8/24/1999
  • Label: Varese Sarabande
  • UPC: 030206104325
  • Catalog Number: 1043

Tracks

Disc 1
  1. 1 Spiral (3:50)
  2. 2 Dot Com (4:25)
  3. 3 Awol (5:19)
  4. 4 Nothing at All (0:56)
  5. 5 Wicked Windows (4:40)
  6. 6 Hunt by Numbers (4:00)
  7. 7 Hot Mango Flush (3:49)
  8. 8 El Niño (4:40)
  9. 9 Black Mamba (5:00)
  10. 10 Mango Surprise (1:14)
  11. 11 Bends Like a Willow (4:53)
  12. 12 Far Alaska (4:06)
  13. 13 The Dog-Ear Years (3:34)
  14. 14 A Gift of Roses (3:54)
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Album Credits

Performance Credits
Jethro Tull Primary Artist
Najma Bass Guitar, Vocals
Ian Anderson Acoustic Guitar, Bouzouki, Flute, Vocals, Wood Flute, Bamboo Flute
Martin Barre Acoustic Guitar, Electric Guitar
Andy Giddings Organ, Piano, Accordion, Keyboards, Hammond Organ
Doane Perry Percussion, Drums, Electric Piano
Jonathan Noyce Bass Guitar
Technical Credits
Ian Anderson Producer, Engineer, Artwork, Paintings
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Customer Reviews

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 1, 2010

    A vast improvement!

    Now, admittedly, Ian Anderson's voice is not nearly as sonorous, flexible, or wide in range as it was in its glory days (witness any of the first few albums; the man definitely could sing well, putting it conservatively). However, this is the first album of Tull's I've heard since ''Crest Of A Knave'' whereby Ian's voice hasn't sickened me. He's learned to sing softer, within his now lower-baritone range (whereas he had been, I suppose, a high-baritone). And the songs! Ian had often written about love, but in a witty and clever way, and not just in the usual sex-sex-and-more-sex manner of much rock music (priggish though that may sound!). ''Catfish Rising'' and ''Rock Island'' had frankly disappointed me with some of its relatively lewd numbers (well, lewd compared to ''Sossity,'' ''Cross-Eyed Mary,'' or ''Wond'ring aloud,'' say). Ian's gotten back to writing more in his old vein -- not trying to write or sound like anyone but himself. Thank heavens! The band of course has always been solid, but Martin Barre for a while there seemed to want to be Mark Knopfler. That's a shame, because he has his own style which worked for him before - and which, happily, works for him again, now that he's gotten back to it. All in all, this is an example of a band aging gracefully, staying true to itself while working within the changes that occur with age (such as the change in Ian's voice). Give Jethro Tull a hand for this album.

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