J2EE Web Services

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Overview

J2EE™ Web Services is written in the tradition of great books people have come to expect from author Richard Monson-Haefel. More than a complete and concise Web services reference, this essential guide is the way for J2EE developers to quickly master Web services architecture and development.”

         —Floyd Marinescu
             Author, EJB Design Patterns
             Director, TheServerSide.com

“Written in a straightforward and approachable style, Monson-Haefel’s latest book is a mustread for any Java developer who is serious about understanding and applying the J2EE APIs in support of Web services. By concentrating on the core technologies endorsed by the WS-I, it clearly explains why Web services will succeed in realizing the interoperability promise where previous attempts have failed.”

         —James McCabe
             Software IT Architect IBM

“This is the best—and most complete—description of J2EE Web services that I’ve seen. If you’re a Java developer, you need this book.”

         —David Chappell
             Chappell & Associates

“For Java Web service developers, this book is going to be there on their desk next to their PC for easy reference. The book has it all, clear guides as to what WSDL, SAAJ, UDDI are, and how they are used in a variety of examples. Monson-Haefel has created another classic with this volume.”

         —Dr. Bruce Scharlau
             Department of Computing Science
             University of Aberdeen, Scotland

“Richard Monson-Haefel provides the most comprehensive analysis of J2EE Web services that I’ve seen so far to date. This book covers the core Web services technologies (XML, SOAP, WSDL, and UDDI), as well as the Java APIs for Web services (JAX-RPC, SAAJ, JAXR, JAXP, and Web Services for J2EE, version 1.1). Richard also goes into detail on issues such as fault handling, type mapping, and JAX-RPC handlers. Developers will find this book to be a very valuable reference.”

         —Anne Thomas Manes
             Research Director, Burton Group
             Author, Web Services: A Manager’s Guide

J2EE™ Web Services is an excellent reference and tutorial for both beginning and seasoned Web services architects and developers. This book is the first to fully cover the WS-I 1.0 Web services standards and their integration with J2EE 1.4 components. Spend time with this book, and you’ll soon master J2EE Web Services and be able to successfully use this technology to solve key business integration problems in your enterprise.”

         —Tom Marrs
             Senior J2EE/XML/Web Services Architect
             Distributed Computing Solutions, Inc.

Web services are revolutionizing the way enterprises conduct business, as they allow disparate applications to communicate and exchange business data. Now, Java 2, Enterprise Edition (J2EE™) delivers a complete Web services platform. But how do you make sense of the sea of acronyms in this emerging area? Richard Monson-Haefel comes to the rescue with this essential guide for Java developers who need to understand J2EE APIs for Web services and the Web services standards.

J2EE™ Web Services is a comprehensive guide to developing and deploying Web services using J2EE technology. Concentrating on standards sanctioned by the Web Services Interoperability Organization (WS-I) for maximum interoperability, the author delves into Web-service standards and the J2EE 1.4 Web-service APIs and components with clear and engaging discussions.

Key topics covered include:

  • XML (eXtensible Markup Language) and XML Schema
  • SOAP (Simple Object Access Protocol)
  • WSDL (Web Services Description Language)
  • UDDI (Universal Description, Discovery, and Integration)
  • JAX-RPC (Java API for XML-based RPC)
  • SAAJ (SOAP with Attachments API for Java)
  • JAXR (Java API for XML Registries)
  • JAXP (Java API for XML Processing)

The appendices complement this wealth of information with coverage of XML regular expressions, Base 64 encoding, DTDs (document type definitions), SOAP Messages with Attachments (SwA), RCP/Encoded SOAP messaging, and references to other resources. In short, this accessible reference will give Java developers the tools they need to use J2EE technologies and APIs to integrate both enterprise applications and Web-based applications.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780321146182
  • Publisher: Addison-Wesley
  • Publication date: 10/20/2003
  • Pages: 887
  • Product dimensions: 7.00 (w) x 9.25 (h) x 1.72 (d)

Meet the Author

Richard Monson-Haefel currently serves on the J2EE 1.4 and EJB 2.1 expert groups for the Java Community Process. He is a founder of the Apache J2EE Application Server Project (Geronimo) and a lead developer of its J2EE Web Services implementation. He assisted Sun in the development of the SCDJWS Exam. Mr. Monson-Haefel is the author of four best-selling editions of Enterprise JavaBeans, which won the 2001 JavaPRO Reader's Choice award for Best Advanced Java Book, the 1999 Java Developer Journal's Editor's Choice award for Best Java Book, and Amazon's Best of 2001 and Best of 2002 awards. He is also the coauthor of Java Message Service, which won the 2002 Java Developer Journal's Reader's Choice award for Best Java Book.

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Read an Excerpt

This book is sharply focused. It concentrates on only those Web services standards that are sanctioned by the Web Services Interoperability Organization's Basic Profile 1.0, because these are the only standards that have been proven in production and are explicitly required by the J2EE Web Services platform. This book also covers only those J2EE APIs and components that are specific to Web services. The truth is, the primary Web service standards (

Are Web Services Important?

Revolutionary technologies tend to take the media by storm and then eventually become ubiquitous. The World Wide Web, Java technology, and

First introduced in 2000, Web services is also a revolutionary technology. It was introduced with a great deal of media hyperbole, but has since settled down to business and is just beginning to enjoy rapid adoption by the developer community. If you did not get involved in Web services before 2003, don't worry; you didn't miss much. The first two years should be considered experimental, the beta period of Web services. It was a time when the Web services community defined a cornucopia of specifications and discovered numerous real-world problems when attempting to make those specifications work in production. The year 2003, however, marks the beginning of hyperactive growth in Web services. If you are just jumping on board the Web services bandwagon, your timing couldn't be better. Consider yourself a pioneer of a revolutionary technology, and prepare to immerse yourself in one of the most important innovations in the history of distributed computing.What Do I Need to Know to Read This Book?

This book is written for Java developers who want to learnabout Web services and related APIs defined by J2EE 1.4. It is more of a reference than a tutorial, but many of the chapters have a tutorial-like style. This book is designed to teach J2EE Web Services and is more than a reference.

You must have experience in the Java programming language to read this book. If you don't, you'll find all the material after Chapter 9 difficult to understand. In addition, you should have some basic understanding of the J2EE platform. This book covers only the Web services functionality of J2EE, not other J2EE APIs or technologies.

To read this book, you do not need to know anything about

What Does This Book Cover?

This book focuses only on the Web services standards and the J2EE 1.4 Web Services APIs and components—all other topics are deferred to other specialized books or to more general books. Specifically this book covers the following Web service standards:

  • SOAP 1.1
  • SOAP Messages with Attachments
  • WSDL 1.1
  • UDDI 2.0
  • WS-I Basic Profile 1.0

The Web services standards take up the first third of the book, Chapters 1-8, while the rest of the book focuses on the J2EE Web Services APIs:

  • JAX-RPC 1.1
  • SAAJ 1.2
  • JAXR 1.0
  • JAXP 1.2

This book covers the use of the Web Services APIs as specified in J2EE 1.4 because version 1.4 is the first Java platform that fully embraces the Web service paradigm. How Is This Book Organized?

The book is designed as a reference and a tutorial about J2EE Web Services. The chapters tend to build on one another. Once you read Part I on

The book is divided into seven parts, each of which is made up of two or more chapters about a specific Web service standard or J2EE API, plus one introductory chapter. Each part begins with an introduction page that tells you how to read the chapters, and specifically which parts you really must read and which parts are optional reference material.

Every chapter is organized into four to five levels of headings labeled with a hierarchical dot notation. This labeling scheme is used in many specifications today, and is particularly useful for a reference book because it makes it much easier to discuss certain portions of the book with your colleagues. The book also includes appendices that cover important topics like

The following outline of the book includes a short description of each chapter.

  • Chapter 1 summarizes the topics covered by this book, presents a brief architectural overview of J2EE 1.4, and provides abstracts about

Part I:

Chapters 2 and 3 cover in detail

  • Chapter 2 covers
  • Chapter 3 provides both basic and advanced coverage of the W3C's

Part II: SOAP and WSDL

Chapters 4 and 5 gently introduce SOAP 1.1 and WSDL 1.1. This part assumes you are already familiar with

  • Chapter 4 explains the structure of SOAP messages, terminology, and processing rules.
  • Chapter 5 covers WSDL 1.1. Part III: UDDI

Chapters 6 through 8 provide a reference to the UDDI 2.0 data types, and to query and publishing methods. This part of the book assumes you are already familiar with

  • Chapter 6 provides a gentle introduction to the UDDI data types.
  • Chapters 7 and 8 are pure reference material; they provide schema information about the UDDI Inquiry and Publishing APIs. Part IV: JAX-RPC

Chapters 9 through 15 provide very detailed coverage of the entire Java API for

  • Chapter 9 introduces various features of JAX-RPC.
  • Chapter 10 covers JAX-RPC service endpoints (JSEs) and their relationship to the servlet container system.
  • Chapter 11 covers EJB endpoints, EJB stateless session beans that act as Web services.
  • Chapter 12 studies in detail the JAX-RPC client APIs you will use to communicate with other Web services.
  • Chapter 13 covers the use of SAAJ 1.2.
  • Chapter 14 describes the use and configuration of message handlers, which are used to pre- and post-process SOAP messages.
  • Chapter 15 covers Java-to-WSDL and Java-to-

Part V: JAXR

Chapters 16 through 19 cover in detail the Java API for

  • Chapter 16 gives you an overview of JAXR and helps you prepare for subsequent chapters.
  • Chapter 17 and 18 present a detailed study of the JAXR domain objects that are mapped to UDDI data types.
  • Chapter 19 covers the JAXR Inquiry and Publishing APIs, which can be used to query, add, and update information in a UDDI registry. Part VI: JAXP

Chapters 20 and 21 serve as a primer on the Java API for

  • Chapter 20 covers SAX2, the event-driven
  • Chapter 21 covers the DOM 2

Part VII: Deployment

Chapters 22 through 24 provide a detailed study of the

  • Chapter 22 covers general J2EE deployment descriptors used for deploying JSEs and EJB endpoints.
  • Chapter 23 covers the Web service-specific deployment descriptors as defined by the Web Services for J2EE (WS-J2EE) specification.
  • Chapter 24 covers the JAX-RPC mapping file, which determines how WSDL and

What Doesn't This Book Cover?

As I said at the start of this preface, this book focuses only on standard Web service technologies and the core J2EE 1.4 Web Services APIs. There is simply too much material in this book to allow for coverage of other topics. Non-Web Service Aspects of the J2EE Platform

Although this book provides detailed coverage of the J2EE 1.4 Web Services APIs, as well as an overview of servlets and EJBs, J2EE is too large a topic to cover comprehensively. It's expected that you have some general knowledge about J2EE or that you will seek to learn more about the J2EE platform and APIs unrelated to Web services from other resources.

The author of this book has written two other J2EE books: Enterprise JavaBeans (Fourth Edition, O'Reilly 2004) and Java Message Service (with David A. Chappell, O'Reilly, 2000). Vendor-Specific Configuration and Administration

There is a wide variety of J2EE platforms for you to choose from: BEA's WebLogic, IBM's WebSphere, Sun Microsystems' Sun ONE, Oracle9i Application Server, IONA's Application Server Platform, Apple WebObjects, Borland Enterprise Server, Pramati's Pramati Server, the Apache J2EE, jBoss and ObjectWeb open source projects, and many others. While each of these platforms adheres to the J2EE specification, they all specify very different procedures and interfaces for installing, configuring, and deploying applications. Because the administration of each J2EE platform is different, this book doesn't attempt to cover installation, configuration, or deployment except in terms of standard J2EE requirements. To learn about vendor-specific administration and configuration requirements, please consult the vendor's documentation.Other Web Service "Standards"

There are a number of new Web service standards that have been proposed by various organizations (W3C, OASIS, eb

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Table of Contents

Preface.

Are Web Services Important?

What Do I Need to Know to Read This Book?

What Does This Book Cover?

How Is This Book Organized?

What Doesn't This Book Cover?

Acknowledgments.

1. An Overview of J2EE 1.4 Web Services.

The J2EE Platform.

The Technologies of Web Services.

The J2EE Web Service APIs.

Wrapping Up.

I. XML.

2. XML Basics.

XML Primer.

XML Namespaces.

Wrapping Up.

3. The W3C XML schema language.

XML Schema Basics.

Advanced XML Schema.

Wrapping Up.

II. SOAP AND WSDL.

4. SOAP.

The Basic Structure of SOAP.

SOAP Namespaces.

SOAP Headers.

The SOAP Body.

SOAP Messaging Modes.

SOAP Faults.

SOAP over HTTP.

Wrapping Up.

5. WSDL.

The Basic Structure of WSDL.

WSDL Declarations: The definitions, types, and import Elements.

The WSDL Abstract Interface: The message, portType, and operation Elements.

WSDL Messaging Exchange Patterns.

WSDL Implementation: The binding Element.

WSDL Implementation: The service and port Elements.

WS-I Conformance Claims.

Wrapping Up.

III. UDDI.

6. The UDDI Data Structures.

The businessEntity Structure.

The businessService and bindingTemplate Structures.

The tModel Structure.

The publisherAssertion Structure.

UUID Keys.

WS-I Conformance Claims.

Wrapping Up.

7. The UDDI Inquiry API.

General Information about UDDI SOAP Messaging.

The Inquiry Operations.

Wrapping Up.

8. The UDDI Publishing API.

Operation Definitions and Payloads.

Fault Messages.

Wrapping Up.

IV. JAX-RPC.

9. JAX-RPC Overview.

The Server-Side Programming Models.

The Client-Side Programming Models.

Other JAX-RPC Topics Covered.

SAAJ

Wrapping Up.

10. JAX-RPC Service Endpoints.

A Simple JSE Example.

The JSE Runtime Environment.

Multi-threading and JSEs.

Wrapping Up.

11. JAX-RPC EJB Endpoints.

An Enterprise JavaBeans Primer.

Enterprise JavaBeans Web Services.

Wrapping Up.

12. JAX-RPC Client APIs.

Generated Stubs.

Dynamic Proxies.

DII.

Wrapping Up.

13. SAAJ.

A Simple SAAJ Example.

Creating a SOAP Message.

Working with SOAP Documents.

Working with SOAP Faults.

Sending SOAP Messages with SAAJ.

SAAJ 1.2 and DOM 2.

Wrapping Up.

14. Message Handlers.

A Simple Example.

Handler Chains and Order of Processing.

The Handler Runtime Environment.

Wrapping Up.

15. Mapping Java to WSDL and XML.

Mapping WSDL to Java.

Mapping XML Schema to Java.

Holders.

Faults and Java Exceptions.

Wrapping Up.

V. JAXR.

16. Getting Started with JAXR.

Using a UDDI Test Registry.

Connecting to a UDDI Registry.

Using the RegistryService and BusinessLifeCycleManager.

The BulkResponse Type.

Exceptions.

Wrapping Up.

17. The JAXR Business Objects.

The RegistryObject Interface.

The Organization Information Object.

Wrapping Up.

18. The JAXR Technical Objects.

The Service and ServiceBinding Information Objects.

The Concept Information Object.

The SpecificationLink Information Object.

The Association Information Object.

Predefined Enumerations.

Wrapping Up.

19. The JAXR Inquiry and Publishing APIs.

Mapping JAXR to the UDDI Inquiry API.

Mapping JAXR to the UDDI Publishing API.

Wrapping Up.

VI. JAXP.

20. SAX2.

Parsing with SAX: XMLReaderFactory and XMLReader.

The ContentHandler and DefaultHandler Interfaces.

Validating with W3C XML Schema.

Wrapping Up.

21. DOM 2.

Parsing with DOM: DocumentBuilderFactory and DocumentBuilder.

Nodes.

Building a DOM Document.

Copying Nodes.

Wrapping Up.

VII. DEPLOYMENT.

22. J2EE Deployment.

Overview of the J2EE Deployment Process.

J2EE Web Services Deployment.

Deploying JSEs.

Deploying EJB Endpoints.

Service References.

Wrapping Up.

23. Web Service Descriptors.

The wsdl-file and wsdl-port Elements.

The port-component-name Element.

The service-endpoint-interface Element.

The service-impl-bean Element.

The jaxrpc-mapping-file Element.

The handler Element.

Wrapping Up.

24. JAX-RPC Mapping Files.

Conditions for a Lightweight JAX-RPC Mapping File.

A Lightweight Example.

A Heavyweight Example.

Anatomy of a Mapping File.

Wrapping Up.

VIII. INTRODUCTION.

Appendix A. XML DTDs.

Appendix B. XML Schema Regular Expressions.

Character Sets.

Quantifiers.

Other Meta-characters.

Real-World Examples.

Appendix C. Base64 Encoding.

Appendix D. SOAP RPC/Encoded.

The soap:encodingStyle Attribute.

The Operation Structs.

Simple Types.

Complex Types.

Array Types.

References.

Wrapping Up.

Appendix E. SOAP Messages with Attachments.

Understanding MIME.

Using MIME with SOAP.

Wrapping Up.

Appendix F. SAAJ Attachments.

The Java Activation Framework.

SAAJ and JAF: AttachmentPart.

The SOAPPart.

The SOAPEnvelope.

Wrapping Up.

Appendix G. JAX-RPC and SwA.

JAF Revisited: DataContentHandler and DataSource Types.

A Simple Example.

Mapping MIME Types to Java.

Using DataHandler and DataSource Types.

Wrapping Up.

Appendix H. Using JAX-RPC DII without a WSDL Document.

Bibliography.

Index. 0321146182T10062003

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Preface

This book is sharply focused. It concentrates on only those Web services standards that are sanctioned by the Web Services Interoperability Organization's Basic Profile 1.0, because these are the only standards that have been proven in production and are explicitly required by the J2EE Web Services platform. This book also covers only those J2EE APIs and components that are specific to Web services. The truth is, the primary Web service standards (XML, SOAP, WSDL, and UDDI), as well as the J2EE Web Services APIs (JAX-RPC, SAAJ, JAXR, and JAXP), are pretty complicated, and you are going to need to spend time studying this book in order to master them. That said, I think you will find this book to be a pretty easy read and an excellent desk-side reference.

Are Web Services Important?

Revolutionary technologies tend to take the media by storm and then eventually become ubiquitous. The World Wide Web, Java technology, and XML seem to be everywhere, don't they? Each of these technologies saw rapid adoption and today are considered essential ingredients of enterprise-level computing.

First introduced in 2000, Web services is also a revolutionary technology. It was introduced with a great deal of media hyperbole, but has since settled down to business and is just beginning to enjoy rapid adoption by the developer community. If you did not get involved in Web services before 2003, don't worry; you didn't miss much. The first two years should be considered experimental, the beta period of Web services. It was a time when the Web services community defined a cornucopia of specifications and discovered numerous real-world problems when attempting to make those specifications workin production. The year 2003, however, marks the beginning of hyperactive growth in Web services. If you are just jumping on board the Web services bandwagon, your timing couldn't be better. Consider yourself a pioneer of a revolutionary technology, and prepare to immerse yourself in one of the most important innovations in the history of distributed computing.

What Do I Need to Know to Read This Book?

This book is written for Java developers who want to learn about Web services and related APIs defined by J2EE 1.4. It is more of a reference than a tutorial, but many of the chapters have a tutorial-like style. This book is designed to teach J2EE Web Services and is more than a reference.

You must have experience in the Java programming language to read this book. If you don't, you'll find all the material after Chapter 9 difficult to understand. In addition, you should have some basic understanding of the J2EE platform. This book covers only the Web services functionality of J2EE, not other J2EE APIs or technologies.

To read this book, you do not need to know anything about XML, SOAP, WSDL, UDDI, or any of the J2EE Web Services APIs (JAX-RPC, SAAJ, JAXR, or JAXP). I've covered these topics in enough detail that I'm confident even a complete novice will be able to understand them.

What Does This Book Cover?

This book focuses only on the Web services standards and the J2EE 1.4 Web Services APIs and components—all other topics are deferred to other specialized books or to more general books. Specifically this book covers the following Web service standards:

  • XML 1.0
  • SOAP 1.1
  • SOAP Messages with Attachments
  • WSDL 2.0
  • WS-I Basic Profile 1.0

The Web services standards take up the first third of the book, Chapters 1-8, while the rest of the book focuses on the J2EE Web Services APIs:

  • JAX-RPC 1.1
  • SAAJ 1.2
  • JAXR 1.0
  • JAXP 1.2

This book covers the use of the Web Services APIs as specified in J2EE 1.4 because version 1.4 is the first Java platform that fully embraces the Web service paradigm.

How Is This Book Organized?

The book is designed as a reference and a tutorial about J2EE Web Services. The chapters tend to build on one another. Once you read Part I on XML, you are prepared to read Part II on SOAP and WSDL. Similarly, before you read Part IV on JAX-RPC (Java API for XML-based RPC) you should understand XML, SOAP, and WSDL. Once you have read this book and understand J2EE Web services, it should continue to be very helpful as a reference. You can use it in your everyday work to look up information about Web service standards and the J2EE 1.4 Web Services APIs.

The book is divided into seven parts, each of which is made up of two or more chapters about a specific Web service standard or J2EE API, plus one introductory chapter. Each part begins with an introduction page that tells you how to read the chapters, and specifically which parts you really must read and which parts are optional reference material.

Every chapter is organized into four to five levels of headings labeled with a hierarchical dot notation. This labeling scheme is used in many specifications today, and is particularly useful for a reference book because it makes it much easier to discuss certain portions of the book with your colle includes appendices that cover important topics like XML regular expressions, Base64 encoding, DTDs, SOAP Messages with Attachments, and RPC/Encoded messaging.

The following outline of the book includes a short description of each chapter.

  • Chapter 1 summarizes the topics covered by this book, presents a brief architectural overview of J2EE 1.4, and provides abstracts about XML, SOAP, WSDL, UDDI, WS-I, JAX-RPC, SAAJ, JAXR, and JAXP.
Part I: XML

Chapters 2 and 3 cover in detail XML 1.0 and the XML Schema standard defined by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C). This part assumes you have no prior knowledge of XML and explains the topic from the ground up.

  • Chapter 2 covers XML and XML namespaces.
  • Chapter 3 provides both basic and advanced coverage of the W3C's XML Schema standard.
Part II: SOAP and WSDL

Chapters 4 and 5 gently introduce SOAP 1.1 and WSDL 1.1. This part assumes you are already familiar with XML, XML namespaces, and XML schema as described in Part I.

  • Chapter 4 explains the structure of SOAP messages, terminology, and processing rules.
  • Chapter 5 covers WSDL 1.1.
Part III: UDDI

Chapters 6 through 8 provide a reference to the UDDI 2.0 data types, and to query and publishing methods. This part of the book assumes you are already familiar with XML, XML schema, SOAP, and WSDL as covered in Parts I and II.

  • Chapter 6 provides a gentle introduction to the UDDI data types.
  • Chapters 7 and 8 are pure reference material; they provide schema information about the UDDI Inquiry and Publ
Part IV: JAX-RPC

Chapters 9 through 15 provide very detailed coverage of the entire Java API for XML-based RPC (JAX-RPC), version 1.1. This part assumes you already know XML, XML schema, SOAP, and WSDL.

  • Chapter 9 introduces various features of JAX-RPC.
  • Chapter 10 covers JAX-RPC service endpoints (JSEs) and their relationship to the servlet container system.
  • Chapter 11 covers EJB endpoints, EJB stateless session beans that act as Web services.
  • >Chapter 12 studies in detail the JAX-RPC client APIs you will use to communicate with other Web services.
  • Chapter 13 covers the use of SAAJ 1.2.
  • Chapter 14 describes the use and configuration of message handlers, which are used to pre- and post-process SOAP messages.
  • Chapter 15 covers Java-to-WSDL and Java-to-XML mapping, which describes how XML and WSDL types are translated into Java code.
Part V: JAXR

Chapters 16 through 19 cover in detail the Java API for XML Registries (JAXR), version 1.0. Specifically they explain how to use the JAXR API to publish and query information in a UDDI registry.

  • Chapter 16 gives you an overview of JAXR and helps you prepare for subsequent chapters.
  • Chapter 17 and 18 present a detailed study of the JAXR domain objects that are mapped to UDDI data types.
  • Chapter 19 covers the JAXR Inquiry and Publishing APIs, which can be used to query, add, and update information in a UDDI registry.
Part VI: JAXP

Chapters 20 and 21 serve as a primer on the Java API for XML Proce they cover the use of SAX2 and DOM 2.

  • Chapter 20 covers SAX2, the event-driven XML parser API.
  • Chapter 21 covers the DOM 2 XML parser API.
Part VII: Deployment

Chapters 22 through 24 provide a detailed study of the XML deployment descriptors used in J2EE Web Services, as well as an overview of JAR packaging and deployment.

  • Chapter 22 covers general J2EE deployment descriptors used for deploying JSEs and EJB endpoints.
  • Chapter 23 covers the Web service-specific deployment descriptors as defined by the Web Services for J2EE (WS-J2EE) specification.
  • Chapter 24 covers the JAX-RPC mapping file, which determines how WSDL and XML types are mapped to Java interfaces and Java beans.

What Doesn't This Book Cover?

As I said at the start of this preface, this book focuses only on standard Web service technologies and the core J2EE 1.4 Web Services APIs. There is simply too much material in this book to allow for coverage of other topics.

Non-Web Service Aspects of the J2EE Platform

Although this book provides detailed coverage of the J2EE 1.4 Web Services APIs, as well as an overview of servlets and EJBs, J2EE is too large a topic to cover comprehensively. It's expected that you have some general knowledge about J2EE or that you will seek to learn more about the J2EE platform and APIs unrelated to Web services from other resources.

The author of this book has written two other J2EE books: Enterprise JavaBeans (Fourth Edition, O'Reilly 2004) and Java Message Service (with David A. Chappell, O'Reilly, 2000).

Vendor-Specific Config Administration

There is a wide variety of J2EE platforms for you to choose from: BEA's WebLogic, IBM's WebSphere, Sun Microsystems' Sun ONE, Oracle9i Application Server, IONA's Application Server Platform, Apple WebObjects, Borland Enterprise Server, Pramati's Pramati Server, the Apache J2EE, jBoss and ObjectWeb open source projects, and many others. While each of these platforms adheres to the J2EE specification, they all specify very different procedures and interfaces for installing, configuring, and deploying applications. Because the administration of each J2EE platform is different, this book doesn't attempt to cover installation, configuration, or deployment except in terms of standard J2EE requirements. To learn about vendor-specific administration and configuration requirements, please consult the vendor's documentation.

Other Web Service "Standards"

There are a number of new Web service standards that have been proposed by various organizations (W3C, OASIS, ebXML, and IBM/Microsoft ) including things like DISCO, WSCI, BTP, WS-Security, DIME, etc. Many of these proposed standards actually conflict or compete with each other. It's unclear which of them will become Web service standards and which of them will die on the vine, so this book covers only the core, WS-I Approved Web service protocols.

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Introduction

This book is sharply focused. It concentrates on only those Web services standards that are sanctioned by the Web Services Interoperability Organization's Basic Profile 1.0, because these are the only standards that have been proven in production and are explicitly required by the J2EE Web Services platform. This book also covers only those J2EE APIs and components that are specific to Web services. The truth is, the primary Web service standards (XML, SOAP, WSDL, and UDDI), as well as the J2EE Web Services APIs (JAX-RPC, SAAJ, JAXR, and JAXP), are pretty complicated, and you are going to need to spend time studying this book in order to master them. That said, I think you will find this book to be a pretty easy read and an excellent desk-side reference.

Are Web Services Important?

Revolutionary technologies tend to take the media by storm and then eventually become ubiquitous. The World Wide Web, Java technology, and XML seem to be everywhere, don't they? Each of these technologies saw rapid adoption and today are considered essential ingredients of enterprise-level computing.

First introduced in 2000, Web services is also a revolutionary technology. It was introduced with a great deal of media hyperbole, but has since settled down to business and is just beginning to enjoy rapid adoption by the developer community. If you did not get involved in Web services before 2003, don't worry; you didn't miss much. The first two years should be considered experimental, the beta period of Web services. It was a time when the Web services community defined a cornucopia of specifications and discovered numerous real-world problems when attempting to make those specificationswork in production. The year 2003, however, marks the beginning of hyperactive growth in Web services. If you are just jumping on board the Web services bandwagon, your timing couldn't be better. Consider yourself a pioneer of a revolutionary technology, and prepare to immerse yourself in one of the most important innovations in the history of distributed computing.

What Do I Need to Know to Read This Book?

This book is written for Java developers who want to learn about Web services and related APIs defined by J2EE 1.4. It is more of a reference than a tutorial, but many of the chapters have a tutorial-like style. This book is designed to teach J2EE Web Services and is more than a reference.

You must have experience in the Java programming language to read this book. If you don't, you'll find all the material after Chapter 9 difficult to understand. In addition, you should have some basic understanding of the J2EE platform. This book covers only the Web services functionality of J2EE, not other J2EE APIs or technologies.

To read this book, you do not need to know anything about XML, SOAP, WSDL, UDDI, or any of the J2EE Web Services APIs (JAX-RPC, SAAJ, JAXR, or JAXP). I've covered these topics in enough detail that I'm confident even a complete novice will be able to understand them.

What Does This Book Cover?

This book focuses only on the Web services standards and the J2EE 1.4 Web Services APIs and components—all other topics are deferred to other specialized books or to more general books. Specifically this book covers the following Web service standards:

  • XML 1.0
  • SOAP 1.1
  • SOAP Messages with Attachments
  • WSDL 1.1
  • UDDI 2.0
  • WS-I Basic Profile 1.0

The Web services standards take up the first third of the book, Chapters 1-8, while the rest of the book focuses on the J2EE Web Services APIs:

  • JAX-RPC 1.1
  • SAAJ 1.2
  • JAXR 1.0
  • JAXP 1.2

This book covers the use of the Web Services APIs as specified in J2EE 1.4 because version 1.4 is the first Java platform that fully embraces the Web service paradigm.

How Is This Book Organized?

The book is designed as a reference and a tutorial about J2EE Web Services. The chapters tend to build on one another. Once you read Part I on XML, you are prepared to read Part II on SOAP and WSDL. Similarly, before you read Part IV on JAX-RPC (Java API for XML-based RPC) you should understand XML, SOAP, and WSDL. Once you have read this book and understand J2EE Web services, it should continue to be very helpful as a reference. You can use it in your everyday work to look up information about Web service standards and the J2EE 1.4 Web Services APIs.

The book is divided into seven parts, each of which is made up of two or more chapters about a specific Web service standard or J2EE API, plus one introductory chapter. Each part begins with an introduction page that tells you how to read the chapters, and specifically which parts you really must read and which parts are optional reference material.

Every chapter is organized into four to five levels of headings labeled with a hierarchical dot notation. This labeling scheme is used in many specifications today, and is particularly useful for a reference book because it makes it much easier to discuss certain portions of The book also includes appendices that cover important topics like XML regular expressions, Base64 encoding, DTDs, SOAP Messages with Attachments, and RPC/Encoded messaging.

The following outline of the book includes a short description of each chapter.

  • Chapter 1 summarizes the topics covered by this book, presents a brief architectural overview of J2EE 1.4, and provides abstracts about XML, SOAP, WSDL, UDDI, WS-I, JAX-RPC, SAAJ, JAXR, and JAXP.
Part I: XML

Chapters 2 and 3 cover in detail XML 1.0 and the XML Schema standard defined by the World Wide Web Consortium (W3C). This part assumes you have no prior knowledge of XML and explains the topic from the ground up.

  • Chapter 2 covers XML and XML namespaces.
  • Chapter 3 provides both basic and advanced coverage of the W3C's XML Schema standard.
Part II: SOAP and WSDL

Chapters 4 and 5 gently introduce SOAP 1.1 and WSDL 1.1. This part assumes you are already familiar with XML, XML namespaces, and XML schema as described in Part I.

  • Chapter 4 explains the structure of SOAP messages, terminology, and processing rules.
  • Chapter 5 covers WSDL 1.1.
Part III: UDDI

Chapters 6 through 8 provide a reference to the UDDI 2.0 data types, and to query and publishing methods. This part of the book assumes you are already familiar with XML, XML schema, SOAP, and WSDL as covered in Parts I and II.

  • Chapter 6 provides a gentle introduction to the UDDI data types.
  • Chapters 7 and 8 are pure reference material; they provide schema information about the UDDI Inquiry
Part IV: JAX-RPC

Chapters 9 through 15 provide very detailed coverage of the entire Java API for XML-based RPC (JAX-RPC), version 1.1. This part assumes you already know XML, XML schema, SOAP, and WSDL.

  • Chapter 9 introduces various features of JAX-RPC.
  • Chapter 10 covers JAX-RPC service endpoints (JSEs) and their relationship to the servlet container system.
  • Chapter 11 covers EJB endpoints, EJB stateless session beans that act as Web services.
  • >Chapter 12 studies in detail the JAX-RPC client APIs you will use to communicate with other Web services.
  • Chapter 13 covers the use of SAAJ 1.2.
  • Chapter 14 describes the use and configuration of message handlers, which are used to pre- and post-process SOAP messages.
  • Chapter 15 covers Java-to-WSDL and Java-to-XML mapping, which describes how XML and WSDL types are translated into Java code.
Part V: JAXR

Chapters 16 through 19 cover in detail the Java API for XML Registries (JAXR), version 1.0. Specifically they explain how to use the JAXR API to publish and query information in a UDDI registry.

  • Chapter 16 gives you an overview of JAXR and helps you prepare for subsequent chapters.
  • Chapter 17 and 18 present a detailed study of the JAXR domain objects that are mapped to UDDI data types.
  • Chapter 19 covers the JAXR Inquiry and Publishing APIs, which can be used to query, add, and update information in a UDDI registry.
Part VI: JAXP

Chapters 20 and 21 serve as a primer on the Java API for XML Proce they cover the use of SAX2 and DOM 2.

  • Chapter 20 covers SAX2, the event-driven XML parser API.
  • Chapter 21 covers the DOM 2 XML parser API.
Part VII: Deployment

Chapters 22 through 24 provide a detailed study of the XML deployment descriptors used in J2EE Web Services, as well as an overview of JAR packaging and deployment.

  • Chapter 22 covers general J2EE deployment descriptors used for deploying JSEs and EJB endpoints.
  • Chapter 23 covers the Web service-specific deployment descriptors as defined by the Web Services for J2EE (WS-J2EE) specification.
  • Chapter 24 covers the JAX-RPC mapping file, which determines how WSDL and XML types are mapped to Java interfaces and Java beans.

What Doesn't This Book Cover?

As I said at the start of this preface, this book focuses only on standard Web service technologies and the core J2EE 1.4 Web Services APIs. There is simply too much material in this book to allow for coverage of other topics.

Non-Web Service Aspects of the J2EE Platform

Although this book provides detailed coverage of the J2EE 1.4 Web Services APIs, as well as an overview of servlets and EJBs, J2EE is too large a topic to cover comprehensively. It's expected that you have some general knowledge about J2EE or that you will seek to learn more about the J2EE platform and APIs unrelated to Web services from other resources.

The author of this book has written two other J2EE books: Enterprise JavaBeans (Fourth Edition, O'Reilly 2004) and Java Message Service (with David A. Chappell, O'Reilly, 2000).

Vendor-Specific Config Administration

There is a wide variety of J2EE platforms for you to choose from: BEA's WebLogic, IBM's WebSphere, Sun Microsystems' Sun ONE, Oracle9i Application Server, IONA's Application Server Platform, Apple WebObjects, Borland Enterprise Server, Pramati's Pramati Server, the Apache J2EE, jBoss and ObjectWeb open source projects, and many others. While each of these platforms adheres to the J2EE specification, they all specify very different procedures and interfaces for installing, configuring, and deploying applications. Because the administration of each J2EE platform is different, this book doesn't attempt to cover installation, configuration, or deployment except in terms of standard J2EE requirements. To learn about vendor-specific administration and configuration requirements, please consult the vendor's documentation.

Other Web Service "Standards"

There are a number of new Web service standards that have been proposed by various organizations (W3C, OASIS, ebXML, and IBM/Microsoft ) including things like DISCO, WSCI, BTP, WS-Security, DIME, etc. Many of these proposed standards actually conflict or compete with each other. It's unclear which of them will become Web service standards and which of them will die on the vine, so this book covers only the core, WS-I Approved Web service protocols.

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Sort by: Showing all of 2 Customer Reviews
  • Posted April 13, 2009

    Most comprehensive

    Book is organized very good with very good exaplanation of contents. This is the only comprehensive book for a developer on webservices.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted November 28, 2003

    Indeed comprehensive

    The alphabet soup subtitle gives a clue as to the book's heft: 'XML, SOAP, WSDL, UDDI, WS-I, JAX-RPC, JAXR, SAAJ, JAXP'. All these can be effectively summarised by the phrase 'Basic Profile 1.0'. This is needed for interoperability of any web service application you might be developing. It is a set of rules telling how to use XML, WSDL, SOAP and UDDI to make your application available as a Web service. If you don't know these 4 items, then basically you need to read most of the book, before being able to deploy an application. The chapters span 733 well written pages (plus there are large appendices). So be warned, it is not trivial to develop a Web service. The clarity of the writing helps assimilation, but the sheer bulk of the text seems necessary. On the positive side, now with BP 1, if you conform to it, your application should indeed work in a diverse environment. Such could not easily be said prior to it. Along the way, you may certainly wonder if the large amount of material needed to be understood is indicative of a still developing field. This barrier may be the single greatest impediment to Web service development. Certainly not the author's fault. He is explaining industry-wide agreed upon standards. Though in the last chapter, he does suggest along these lines that XML deployment descriptors used in J2EE are far too bulky and brittle.

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