J2ME Games with MIDP2

( 3 )

Overview

Java 2 ME (Micro Edition) is the client-side Java development platform for building wireless Java-based cell phone and PDA applications. This book addresses the fun challenge of building game applications for these kinds of portable devices. Author Carol Hamer shows you how to use J2ME for developing, using the latest MIDP 2.0 specification.

If you are new to developing with J2ME, we recommend you first read Jonathan Knudsen's Wireless Java: Developing with J2ME, Second Edition....

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Overview

Java 2 ME (Micro Edition) is the client-side Java development platform for building wireless Java-based cell phone and PDA applications. This book addresses the fun challenge of building game applications for these kinds of portable devices. Author Carol Hamer shows you how to use J2ME for developing, using the latest MIDP 2.0 specification.

If you are new to developing with J2ME, we recommend you first read Jonathan Knudsen's Wireless Java: Developing with J2ME, Second Edition. We suggest that you read this book second, then complete the "series" with David Croft's Advanced Java Game Programming, for a comprehensive Apress experience of game developing with Java.

Table of Contents

  1. Getting Started
  2. Using MIDlets
  3. Using the MIDP 2.0 Games API
  4. Using Threads and Tones
  5. Storing and Retrieving Data
  6. Communicating over a Network
  7. Securing Your Applications
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781590593820
  • Publisher: Apress
  • Publication date: 6/4/2004
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 304
  • Product dimensions: 10.00 (w) x 7.00 (h) x 0.65 (d)

Meet the Author

Carol Hamer received her Ph.D. in number theory from Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey. Since then, she has worked as a software engineer for 10 years in the U.S., France, and Switzerland, including three years working for In-Fusio Mobile Games. Carol has written three books on mobile game programming for Apress: J2ME Games with MIDP2, Creating Mobile Games, and Learn BlackBerry Games Development. She writes a blog called A Little Bitty Java (http://bittyjava.wordpress.com) with programming ideas, troubleshooting tips, and code samples.

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Table of Contents

Ch. 1 Getting started 1
Ch. 2 Using MIDlets 19
Ch. 3 Using the MIDP 2.0 games API 49
Ch. 4 Using threads and tones 93
Ch. 5 Storing and retrieving data 131
Ch. 6 Communicating over a network 199
Ch. 7 Securing your applications 265
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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 2, 2005

    Dissapointing

    Very dry. Very little in terms of pictures. <p>A tough, tough read. <p>Carol could be th ebest J2ME MIDP 2.0 programmer in the world, but I can't read long enough to find out. :-) <p>Sorry!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted July 7, 2004

    single developer platform

    Recently, on buses and trains, I've noticed people using cellphones to play games. On these dinky little screens, with a keypad instead of a keyboard, and with tinny audio. But even having all these constraints, such games have their attraction. This should be the draw to you, to program one of these mobile devices. If the hardware runs Java, then, as Hamer explains, J2ME is used. She describes how Sun stripped out a lot of Java classes, to arrive at a minimal subset that is aware of the severe constraints you face. Limited power. Small screen. Small memory. Intermittant and low bandwidth. No mouse. No keyboard. Get the picture? Yet even under all these limitations, Hamer shows how you can use J2ME and version 2 of MIDP to construct cool games. In many ways, it is harder than writing for a desktop or laptop or game console. But the best attitude is to regard this as a challenge of your ingenuity. Perhaps using this book, you will be the author of the next Tetris. I'm only half joking when I say this. Because there is something about this field that I don't think Hamer explicitly points out. If you go through the book, you should come to the conclusion that you can code an entire game by yourself. Realistically, this is no longer true for games on the other platforms. These are now storyboarded and written by a team of programmers, with often a million dollar budget. With J2ME and this book, you can still do it all.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 4, 2010

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