Jacked Up: The Inside Story of How Jack Welch Talked GE Into Becoming the World's Greatest Company

Jacked Up: The Inside Story of How Jack Welch Talked GE Into Becoming the World's Greatest Company

4.0 3
by Bill Lane
     
 

“Shockingly informative, unexpectedly funny, and a surprisingly good read about Welch’s tenure as GE’s CEO and CRO (chief rhetoric officer).” -Strategy + Business magazine When it comes to leadership, DO YOU KNOW JACK?

NO MORE REPORTS:Jack got quiet for nearly a full minute, and stared down at the table with the semi-scowl that meant

Overview

“Shockingly informative, unexpectedly funny, and a surprisingly good read about Welch’s tenure as GE’s CEO and CRO (chief rhetoric officer).” -Strategy + Business magazine When it comes to leadership, DO YOU KNOW JACK?

NO MORE REPORTS:Jack got quiet for nearly a full minute, and stared down at the table with the semi-scowl that meant some kind of processing was going on. Then he said, loudly and decisively:“No, no, no! We’re not doing this any more. No more ‘reports.’ We’re sick of reports. The only pitches that are worth anything are when you tell people what they ought to do. Otherwise it’s just a waste.”And so it began, gradually, that GE began to move from a self-absorbed corporation to what Welch would later describe with much pride as “a real learning company.”A SHOUT FROM THE BATHROOM:One day Jack brought a copy of a letter he had been sent. It was written by one of our very senior business leaders “explaining” some Corporate initiative. The letter made no sense, and Jack read passages of it aloud, with inflections that emphasized the absurdities in what the man had written. Finally he stopped laughing long enough to render his final criticism.

“It’s like something he yelled out the bathroom door to his secretary while he was sitting on the can. That’s it exactly. This is a shout from the bathroom.”THIS IS JACK: UNCENSORED, IRREPRESSIBLE, AND UNBEATABLE

Bill Lane joined GE as a speechwriter in 1980, after seven years at the Pentagon. From 1982 to 2001, he was Manager, Executive Communications for the Company, and Jack Welch’s speechwriter.

Editorial Reviews

As Jack Welch's speechwriter for 20 years, Bill Lane sat within the gates of corporate power. His job provided him with unique opportunities to witness and often participate in the legendary General Electric CEO's epoch-making actions. Lane's jacked-up memoir tracks the sometimes testy Welch as he micromanages GE's improbable resurrection. He details Welch's boldest moves and his most impetuous decisions; his skillful consensus building and his decisive responses to adversity. Serious business readers will be particularly attentive to his description of Welch's obsession with effective communication; everybody will enjoy the boardroom gossip. A valuable tutorial on getting your message across corporate divides.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780071544108
Publisher:
McGraw-Hill Companies, The
Publication date:
01/11/2008
Pages:
300
Product dimensions:
6.30(w) x 9.20(h) x 1.13(d)

Meet the Author

Bill Lane joined GE as a speechwriter in 1980, after seven years at the Pentagon. From 1982 to 2001, he was Manager, Executive Communications for the Company, and Jack Welch’s speechwriter.



Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Jacked Up: The Inside Story of How Jack Welch Talked GE Into Becoming the World's Greatest Company 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
RolfDobelli More than 1 year ago
Jack Welch was the most famous CEO in the U.S. when he ran General Electric. During the Welch era (1981-2001), GE's value skyrocketed, making millionaires of employees with stock options. CEOs across the globe adopted Welch's strategies for streamlining operations, reducing payrolls and dominating markets. Welch retired superrich (current estimated net worth: $720 million) - not bad for a short, stumpy, middle-class guy with a lifelong stutter and an explosive temper. GE staffers called Welch "Neutron Jack" because of his temper, his pettiness and his heavy hand with firings, more than 100,000 during his first four years as CEO. In this book, Bill Lane, Welch's speechwriter for two decades, reveals the true man, warts and all. Despite his singular accomplishments, Welch comes across in Lane's book as an abusive tyrant and a bully. Lane doesn't make himself look much better, from commenting on a female stockbroker's "great legs" to throwing around expletives. He paints an unattractive picture of overpaid, self-indulgent, immature executives, pitching things at each other and acting, as Lane puts it, like "little boys competing for attention in the schoolyard." getAbstract finds that this book is a top-notch primer on executive communication and recommends it for that purpose. Just don't pay as much attention to the way its stars comport themselves when they're not in public.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This book mirrors my views of business meetings and presentations. Most are meaningless drivel meant to fill a time allotment. Many of the presentations that I endure are forgettable. I liken them to mating chickens - lots of wing flapping, flying dust and feathers, and an egg layed in the end. If you want to improve your delivery and give your people the initiative they need to say something meaningful, read this book. I enjoyed it from beginning to end.