The Jacket

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Overview

Phil is a sixth grader on a mission. His absentminded little brother forgot his lunch money, and he's got to find him in the throngs of fourth and fifth graders crowding the school hallway. With a sigh of relief, Phil spots Jimmy's one-of-a-kind jacket. Only the person wearing the jacket isn't his brother; it's someone he's never seen before, who happens to be black. Automatically Phil assumes that this youth, Daniel, has stolen the jacket. When Phil finds out the truth about why Daniel has his brother's jacket, ...
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The Jacket

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Overview

Phil is a sixth grader on a mission. His absentminded little brother forgot his lunch money, and he's got to find him in the throngs of fourth and fifth graders crowding the school hallway. With a sigh of relief, Phil spots Jimmy's one-of-a-kind jacket. Only the person wearing the jacket isn't his brother; it's someone he's never seen before, who happens to be black. Automatically Phil assumes that this youth, Daniel, has stolen the jacket. When Phil finds out the truth about why Daniel has his brother's jacket, he is forced to examine his own racist thoughts and how they play out in his life. With The Jacket, Andrew Clements, the bestselling author of Frindle, has written a thought-provoking, timely story...a compelling exploration of race relations.

An incident at school forces sixth grader Phil Morelli, a white boy, to become aware of racial discrimination and segregation, and to seriously consider if he himself is prejudiced.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
From the acclaimed author of Frindle comes a compelling exploration of race relations, told through the experiences of an elementary-school student. In The Jacket, a sixth-grader makes the wrong assumptions about another student simply because of his color, and as a result, he is forced to examine his own racist thoughts and how they play out in his life.
Publishers Weekly
A sixth grader realizes he is prejudiced when he falsely assumes that an African-American schoolmate has stolen his coat. "The story pointedly delivers a timely message and can serve as a springboard for dialogue about tolerance and self-honesty," wrote PW. Ages 8-12. (Aug.) Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information.
Children's Literature
When sixth-grader Philip Moreli spots his brother's jacket on a fifth-grader he doesn't know, sparks fly and the boys wind up in the principal's office. The jacket, it turns out, was a gift, not stolen property, and Philip must consider his assumptions about how African-American Daniel ended up with the jacket. The aftermath of the explosive encounter prompts some honest soul searching and a new awareness of race and place on Philip's part. Both boys learn that honesty and a second chance to look at life from another's point of view make understanding it a little easier. Once again, Andrew Clements demonstrates a deft portrayal of kids in schools and a willingness to tackle important themes. Philip and Daniel are likeable characters, and the plot and dialogue are as honest as the problems are real. This well-written story about the growth of one boy's social conscience will find a welcome place on the shelves of thoughtful readers and teachers. 2002, Simon and Schuster Books for Young Readers, $12.95. Ages 8 to 12. Reviewer: Anne Field
School Library Journal
Gr 4-7-Sixth-grader Phil sees another boy wearing his younger brother's jacket and accuses him of stealing it. After both of the students end up in the principal's office, Phil discovers that his mother gave the garment to the African-American woman who cleans their house. Lucy Taylor then gave it to her grandson, Daniel, the accused thief. Phil's anger, embarrassment, and confusion over the incident give him a new awareness of race and prejudice. This thin story is more like a character sketch than a fully realized novel. The incident forces Phil to examine himself at a level he has never before considered. He gets along fine with all the kids at school, but all of his friends are white. He has known Lucy all his life, and although he likes her, he has never thought about the details of her life or known that she has a grandson who attends his school. Events are told from Phil's point of view, so Daniel's reactions are experienced on a limited basis only. When the protagonist pays a surprise visit to Daniel's home, he discovers that the neighborhood is almost a mirror image of his own. While purposeful and a bit heavy-handed, the book may spark discussion with a class exploring racism, tolerance, and prejudice. Parents or church youth leaders may also find it useful.-Lucinda Snyder Whitehurst, St. Christopher's School, Richmond, VA Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Kirkus Reviews
Clements (Things Not Seen, below, etc.) offers a heartfelt and well-meaning but somewhat simplistic novella that explores racial-consciousness-raising. When sixth-grader Phil Moreli attempts to bring lunch money to his younger brother in their school's hallway, he quickly meets up with his sibling-or so he thinks-because there's his brother's very distinctive jacket. He is startled when its wearer turns out to be an African-American boy whom Phil has never seen. He wrongly leaps to the conclusion that this boy stole the jacket and a brawl ensues. Once the combatants face off in the principal's office, the truth about how the jacket came into this stranger's possession comes out. Daniel, the African-American boy, had been given the jacket as a gift by his grandmother who, in turn, received it from her employer-Phil's mother-for whom she works as a cleaning woman. Daniel is angry that a white boy would automatically think of him as a thief and humiliated at an act of what he considers condescending charity. He storms out, first throwing the jacket on the floor. Regarding this as a gauntlet and feeling ashamed, Phil is now galvanized into reassessing his feelings and assumptions about African-Americans. He realizes that he actually knows little about them and is convinced that he is prejudiced. Phil's attempts to come to grips with his guilt and chagrin will help young readers reevaluate their own attitudes toward people who are different from themselves. Clements mostly steers clear of easy answers and admirably avoids the cliche of having the boys become fast friends at the end, though each does come to realize that the other is "a good guy." (Fiction. 8-12)
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781424216710
  • Publisher: Fitzgerald Books
  • Publication date: 1/1/2002
  • Format: Library Binding
  • Pages: 89
  • Age range: 8 - 12 Years

Meet the Author

Andrew Clements is the author of the enormously popular Frindle. More than 10 million copies of his books have been sold, and he has been nominated for a multitude of state awards, including two Christopher Awards and an Edgar Award. His popular works include About Average, Troublemaker, Extra Credit, Lost and Found, No Talking, Room One, Lunch Money, and more. He is also the author of the Benjamin Pratt & the Keepers of the School series. He lives with his wife in Maine and has four grown children. Visit him at AndrewClements.com.

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Read an Excerpt

Part I: Collision Course

It was Thursday morning right before first period, and Phil was on a mission. Hurrying through the fourth- and fifth-grade hall, he waded through groups of younger kids. His little brother, Jimmy, had left the house early so he could ride to school with a friend, and he had left his lunch money on the kitchen counter.

Phil was tall for a sixth grader, so most of the younger kids got out of his way. Which was good, because he had no time to mess around. If he got one more tardy during December, he would have to serve two detentions. The pressure made Phil's imagination run at full throttle. Like, if I'm late for math today, then I might not be allowed to take the test -- and then I could flunk math! I might even flunk sixth grade and get left back! And when Mom and Dad yell at me, I'm gonna get so mad, 'cause, like, it's not even my fault! I'll say, "Hey, know what? Forget about school, that's what!" And I'll just drop out and turn into a bum -- or maybe even a criminal. My whole life's gonna be a mess, and it's all on account of my stupid little brother! Where is that punk?

Phil was about to stick his head into a classroom to look around. Then up at the corner of the hallway he thought he saw the back of his brother's jacket. It had to be Jimmy. No one else in the whole city had a jacket like that one.

He called, "Hey, Jimmy!" but his brother didn't stop, and Phil pushed his way forward and rushed around the corner. "Hey, idiot, you forgot..."

But it wasn't Jimmy. It was someone Phil had never seen before, a black kid. Wearing Jimmy's jacket.

Phil grabbed the collar and said, "Hey! This is my brother's jacket! Where is he? How'd you get this from him?"

The other boy struggled, trying to pull away. "What're you talkin' about? Let go of me! This is my jacket! I don't even know your brother!"

The kid twisted and turned to break free, but Phil was a lot bigger and stronger. "You tell me where my brother's at, or I'm gonna -- "

"Boys! You stop it, right now!" Mrs. Atkin came striding through the crowd that had gathered, pushing kids out of her way with her left hand and pointing at Phil with the other one. "You let go of him, and I mean it!"

Drawn by Mrs. Atkin's voice, three or four other teachers stepped out into the hallway.

Phil let go of the jacket, and the younger boy jerked around to face him, his fists up, his eyes narrowed.

Mrs. Atkin stepped between them and said to the younger boy, "Daniel, you put your hands down. And all the rest of you kids, go on about your business. Get your things put away and get to your rooms. Go on, there's nothing happening here." Then, glaring at Phil and the smaller boy, she said, "You two, come with me."

The other teachers were moving around in the hallway now, talking to kids, quieting everyone down.

Phil and Daniel followed Mrs. Atkin along the hall. And Phil knew where they were headed -- straight to the office. He thought, Now I'm gonna flunk out for sure.

At the office door Mrs. Atkin stopped and herded the boys in ahead of her. "Mrs. Cormier? Sorry to start your day like this, but I found these two going at it down in the fourth-grade hall. I've got to get back to my room before something else breaks loose."

The principal still had her coat on from being out at the curb with the buses. She frowned at the boys and pointed toward her office. "Walk in and sit down. And I don't want you two to even look at each other, is that clear?"

Both of them nodded and walked into her office.

A minute later Mrs. Cormier came in and sat down behind her desk. She motioned to Phil, who had taken a chair against the wall. "Come over here and sit in front of me. I want to be able to look each of you in the eye."

Daniel kept looking straight ahead at Mrs. Cormier. When Phil was seated, she said, "Phil, you've got no business being in the four-five hall in the morning. Why were you there?"

"My brother, Jimmy, forgot his lunch money. And I still have to give it to him."

Mrs. Cormier nodded. "All right, that makes sense. Here," she said, putting out her hand, "give me his money, and I'll make sure he gets it."

Phil dug in his pocket and gave the coins to the principal. She put them on her desk and then turned to the other boy. "Okay, Daniel, you first: What happened?"

"What happened is, I'm talking with my friends, and this kid comes and grabs me and starts yelling at me. I've never seen him before. I didn't do a thing!"

Mrs. Cormier turned to Phil. "Did you grab him, Phil?"

"Yeah, 'cause he stole my brother's jacket! That's my old jacket, and now it's my brother's, and this kid stole it, so I grabbed him."

"Liar!" Daniel jumped to his feet and faced Phil, his fists clenched. "I never stole a thing! My gramma gave me this jacket for my birthday, and that's the truth, so you stop saying that!"

"Daniel," said Mrs. Cormier sharply, "you sit down and stay put!" Mrs. Cormier swept her eyes between the boys. "I think this is a simple misunderstanding. Phil, isn't it possible that Daniel happens to have a jacket just like your brother's?"

Phil shook his head forcefully. "No way. My mom bought that jacket when she went to Italy, and she brought it back for me. Go ahead, look at the label inside the neck. It's gonna say 'Ricci di Roma.' That's because she got it in Rome. Go ahead and look. That's my jacket."

Mrs. Cormier stood up and walked around to the front of her desk. "May I look at the label, Daniel?"

He shrugged and stuck his lower lip out. "I don't care. 'Cause this isn't his jacket."

The principal gently pulled the collar of the jacket back, and then twisted her neck and adjusted her glasses. Her eyebrows shot up. "It says 'Ricci di Roma.'"

"See? I told you so," said Phil triumphantly. "He stole it!"

"Did not, you big liar!" And if Mrs. Cormier hadn't been on her feet to catch him, Daniel would have been on top of Phil, fists swinging. She pushed him back into his chair and shouted, "Silence! Not another word, either of you!" Calling to the secretary through the open door, she said, "Mrs. Donne? Get me the emergency cards for Philip Morelli and Daniel Taylor, would you -- right away."

Thirty seconds later Mrs. Cormier was dialing her phone, then smiling and speaking. "Mrs. Taylor? This is Mrs. Cormier, the principal at Daniel's school....No, he's fine, but there's been a disagreement this morning, and he's in the middle of it. It's about a jacket, the one Daniel says he got for his birthday. Another boy is here, and he says the jacket belongs to him. Can you tell me anything else that might help?...Yes....Oh. I see....So it was a gift....Yes, I see. Well, that's it, then. I'm awfully sorry to have bothered you....Yes, you too. Good-bye."

Daniel turned to Phil. "See? I told you so. It was a gift -- for me."

Mrs. Cormier said, "It turns out you're both right, boys. Someone gave that jacket to your grandmother, Daniel, and then she gave it to you."

Phil made a face. "Gave it to his grandmother? How come?"

Mrs. Cormier started to say something, then stopped, smiled awkwardly, and said, "Well, really, I...I think it was just...to be kind. That's all."

Something registered in Phil's mind, and his mouth dropped open. Turning to Daniel, he asked, "Who's your grandma? What's her name?"

Daniel curled his lip. "None of your business. But her name's Lucy. Lucy Taylor."

Phil's face reddened. "Hey, look. I'm sorry I grabbed you, okay? You're right. It's your jacket."

"What?" Daniel looked sideways at Phil, cocking his head as if he hadn't heard clearly. "You come and almost pull this thing off my back, and now you say just keep it? What's that about?"

Phil looked at the floor. "It's just that...like, I think I know your grandma -- that's all. So the jacket's yours."

Daniel frowned and narrowed his eyes. "You? Know my gramma? Right!" He smiled, taunting Phil. "Yeah, like, how you gonna know my gramma? Maybe you see her when you go to the same beauty parlor she does, huh? That it?"

Mrs. Cormier stood up and said, "Boys, that's enough. This is all settled. Daniel, Phil said he's sorry, and we know the jacket is yours. So both of you run along to class now. Mrs. Donne will give you notes for your teachers."

Daniel stood up. He stuck his chin out and said, "Fine with me. Because this boy just keeps telling lies and lies. Like how he knows my gramma."

"I do too know her!" Phil almost shouted. "I'm not a liar! I see her all the time because...because she's my mom's cleaning lady!"

The words seemed to echo off the walls.

Daniel looked like he'd been punched in the stomach. He backed toward the office door, his face working angrily. He yanked the jacket open, pulled himself free of it, and threw it on the floor at Phil's feet. "There's your jacket! You take it and you tell yo' momma that my gramma and me don't need nobody being kind to us!" And looking at Mrs. Cormier, he snarled, "Nobody!"

Text copyright © 2002 by Andrew Clements

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First Chapter

Part I: Collision Course

It was Thursday morning right before first period, and Phil was on a mission. Hurrying through the fourth- and fifth-grade hall, he waded through groups of younger kids. His little brother, Jimmy, had left the house early so he could ride to school with a friend, and he had left his lunch money on the kitchen counter.

Phil was tall for a sixth grader, so most of the younger kids got out of his way. Which was good, because he had no time to mess around. If he got one more tardy during December, he would have to serve two detentions. The pressure made Phil's imagination run at full throttle. Like, if I'm late for math today, then I might not be allowed to take the test -- and then I could flunk math! I might even flunk sixth grade and get left back! And when Mom and Dad yell at me, I'm gonna get so mad, 'cause, like, it's not even my fault! I'll say, "Hey, know what? Forget about school, that's what!" And I'll just drop out and turn into a bum -- or maybe even a criminal. My whole life's gonna be a mess, and it's all on account of my stupid little brother! Where is that punk?

Phil was about to stick his head into a classroom to look around. Then up at the corner of the hallway he thought he saw the back of his brother's jacket. It had to be Jimmy. No one else in the whole city had a jacket like that one.

He called, "Hey, Jimmy!" but his brother didn't stop, and Phil pushed his way forward and rushed around the corner. "Hey, idiot, you forgot..."

But it wasn't Jimmy. It was someone Phil had never seen before, a black kid. Wearing Jimmy's jacket.

Phil grabbed the collar and said, "Hey! This is my brother's jacket! Where is he? How'd you get this from him?"

The other boy struggled, trying to pull away. "What're you talkin' about? Let go of me! This is my jacket! I don't even know your brother!"

The kid twisted and turned to break free, but Phil was a lot bigger and stronger. "You tell me where my brother's at, or I'm gonna -- "

"Boys! You stop it, right now!" Mrs. Atkin came striding through the crowd that had gathered, pushing kids out of her way with her left hand and pointing at Phil with the other one. "You let go of him, and I mean it!"

Drawn by Mrs. Atkin's voice, three or four other teachers stepped out into the hallway.

Phil let go of the jacket, and the younger boy jerked around to face him, his fists up, his eyes narrowed.

Mrs. Atkin stepped between them and said to the younger boy, "Daniel, you put your hands down. And all the rest of you kids, go on about your business. Get your things put away and get to your rooms. Go on, there's nothing happening here." Then, glaring at Phil and the smaller boy, she said, "You two, come with me."

The other teachers were moving around in the hallway now, talking to kids, quieting everyone down.

Phil and Daniel followed Mrs. Atkin along the hall. And Phil knew where they were headed -- straight to the office. He thought, Now I'm gonna flunk out for sure.

At the office door Mrs. Atkin stopped and herded the boys in ahead of her. "Mrs. Cormier? Sorry to start your day like this, but I found these two going at it down in the fourth-grade hall. I've got to get back to my room before something else breaks loose."

The principal still had her coat on from being out at the curb with the buses. She frowned at the boys and pointed toward her office. "Walk in and sit down. And I don't want you two to even look at each other, is that clear?"

Both of them nodded and walked into her office.

A minute later Mrs. Cormier came in and sat down behind her desk. She motioned to Phil, who had taken a chair against the wall. "Come over here and sit in front of me. I want to be able to look each of you in the eye."

Daniel kept looking straight ahead at Mrs. Cormier. When Phil was seated, she said, "Phil, you've got no business being in the four-five hall in the morning. Why were you there?"

"My brother, Jimmy, forgot his lunch money. And I still have to give it to him."

Mrs. Cormier nodded. "All right, that makes sense. Here," she said, putting out her hand, "give me his money, and I'll make sure he gets it."

Phil dug in his pocket and gave the coins to the principal. She put them on her desk and then turned to the other boy. "Okay, Daniel, you first: What happened?"

"What happened is, I'm talking with my friends, and this kid comes and grabs me and starts yelling at me. I've never seen him before. I didn't do a thing!"

Mrs. Cormier turned to Phil. "Did you grab him, Phil?"

"Yeah, 'cause he stole my brother's jacket! That's my old jacket, and now it's my brother's, and this kid stole it, so I grabbed him."

"Liar!" Daniel jumped to his feet and faced Phil, his fists clenched. "I never stole a thing! My gramma gave me this jacket for my birthday, and that's the truth, so you stop saying that!"

"Daniel," said Mrs. Cormier sharply, "you sit down and stay put!" Mrs. Cormier swept her eyes between the boys. "I think this is a simple misunderstanding. Phil, isn't it possible that Daniel happens to have a jacket just like your brother's?"

Phil shook his head forcefully. "No way. My mom bought that jacket when she went to Italy, and she brought it back for me. Go ahead, look at the label inside the neck. It's gonna say 'Ricci di Roma.' That's because she got it in Rome. Go ahead and look. That's my jacket."

Mrs. Cormier stood up and walked around to the front of her desk. "May I look at the label, Daniel?"

He shrugged and stuck his lower lip out. "I don't care. 'Cause this isn't his jacket."

The principal gently pulled the collar of the jacket back, and then twisted her neck and adjusted her glasses. Her eyebrows shot up. "It says 'Ricci di Roma.'"

"See? I told you so," said Phil triumphantly. "He stole it!"

"Did not, you big liar!" And if Mrs. Cormier hadn't been on her feet to catch him, Daniel would have been on top of Phil, fists swinging. She pushed him back into his chair and shouted, "Silence! Not another word, either of you!" Calling to the secretary through the open door, she said, "Mrs. Donne? Get me the emergency cards for Philip Morelli and Daniel Taylor, would you -- right away."

Thirty seconds later Mrs. Cormier was dialing her phone, then smiling and speaking. "Mrs. Taylor? This is Mrs. Cormier, the principal at Daniel's school....No, he's fine, but there's been a disagreement this morning, and he's in the middle of it. It's about a jacket, the one Daniel says he got for his birthday. Another boy is here, and he says the jacket belongs to him. Can you tell me anything else that might help?...Yes....Oh. I see....So it was a gift....Yes, I see. Well, that's it, then. I'm awfully sorry to have bothered you....Yes, you too. Good-bye."

Daniel turned to Phil. "See? I told you so. It was a gift -- for me."

Mrs. Cormier said, "It turns out you're both right, boys. Someone gave that jacket to your grandmother, Daniel, and then she gave it to you."

Phil made a face. "Gave it to his grandmother? How come?"

Mrs. Cormier started to say something, then stopped, smiled awkwardly, and said, "Well, really, I...I think it was just...to be kind. That's all."

Something registered in Phil's mind, and his mouth dropped open. Turning to Daniel, he asked, "Who's your grandma? What's her name?"

Daniel curled his lip. "None of your business. But her name's Lucy. Lucy Taylor."

Phil's face reddened. "Hey, look. I'm sorry I grabbed you, okay? You're right. It's your jacket."

"What?" Daniel looked sideways at Phil, cocking his head as if he hadn't heard clearly. "You come and almost pull this thing off my back, and now you say just keep it? What's that about?"

Phil looked at the floor. "It's just that...like, I think I know your grandma -- that's all. So the jacket's yours."

Daniel frowned and narrowed his eyes. "You? Know my gramma? Right!" He smiled, taunting Phil. "Yeah, like, how you gonna know my gramma? Maybe you see her when you go to the same beauty parlor she does, huh? That it?"

Mrs. Cormier stood up and said, "Boys, that's enough. This is all settled. Daniel, Phil said he's sorry, and we know the jacket is yours. So both of you run along to class now. Mrs. Donne will give you notes for your teachers."

Daniel stood up. He stuck his chin out and said, "Fine with me. Because this boy just keeps telling lies and lies. Like how he knows my gramma."

"I do too know her!" Phil almost shouted. "I'm not a liar! I see her all the time because...because she's my mom's cleaning lady!"

The words seemed to echo off the walls.

Daniel looked like he'd been punched in the stomach. He backed toward the office door, his face working angrily. He yanked the jacket open, pulled himself free of it, and threw it on the floor at Phil's feet. "There's your jacket! You take it and you tell yo' momma that my gramma and me don't need nobody being kind to us!" And looking at Mrs. Cormier, he snarled, "Nobody!"

Text copyright © 2002 by Andrew Clements

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Introduction

Discussion Topics

What's your opinion of how the principal solved the problem between the boys? What would you have done if you'd been the principal? How are conflicts handled in your school? Do you agree with the rules and policies in your school? Why or why not?

Why do you think Phil got so angry when he saw Daniel wearing his brother's jacket? If you were Phil in this story, how would you have reacted when you saw someone wearing your brother's jacket? What would you have done in Daniel's shoes?

Phil thinks "being friends with everyone and being someone's friend are two different things." Do you agree or disagree with him? Why? Describe someone who's your friend. Describe someone who's an acquaintance. What is the same/different about these two people? What makes someone a friend?

Phil wonders how he would have treated Daniel had he been white. Do you think Phil is prejudiced? Why or why not? What does it mean to be prejudiced? Use specific events from the story to support your opinion. How does Phil grow and change as a character from his experiences in this story? What kinds of life lessons does he learn?

Do you think Phil's mom could be prejudiced? Why or why not? What's your opinion about the way that Phil's mom answered his questions about being prejudiced?

Phil's father has some strong feelings about black people in sports. Reread the conversation Phil has with his father about this. What is your opinion? Do you think, "it's all about the black guys"? Why?

Phil realizes that he never knew black kids could live in neighborhoods like his own. He's not sure if he should feel good about this or not. Why? Before reading this story how did you think people ofother races lived? What experiences have you had to give you this knowledge?

Activities and Research

Research people who have fought for civil rights for African Americans in the United States. Make a list of these influential people in history. Pick one and write a biography describing the struggles and hardships he/she faced. Share your biography with the class.

While riding the bus, Phil wonders what it would be like for Daniel to ride on his bus. What would it be like for someone of a different race to ride on your school bus? Research Rosa Parks. What experience did she have with riding a bus? If you had been in Rosa Parks' shoes, do you think you could have been as courageous as she was?

In The Jacket, Phil is dealing with some internal struggles regarding his own ideas about racism. Think of another book that you've read where the main character is also dealing with internal struggles. Compare and contrast these two characters and the issues they are facing.

Continue this story and write the next chapter of The Jacket.

Draw or find a picture of a jacket. Write on it, or attach to it, words that come to mind when you think of the story you've just read. Include words that show your opinion of the story and the message it sends to its readers. Display the jackets on a clothesline in your classroom.

Pretend you are a reporter writing a news article about what has happened between Phil and Daniel and the jacket. Give your article a headline. Organize your facts as they would be in a news story with the most important facts listed first and then the supporting details.

Andrew Clements is the author of the enormously popular FRINDLE. He  has been nominated for a multitude of state awards and has won the Christopher Award and an Edgar Award. His popular works include EXTRA CREDIT, LOST AND FOUND, NO TALKING, ROOM ONE, LUNCH MONEY, A WEEK IN THE WOODS, THE JACKET, THE SCHOOL STORY, THE JANITOR'S BOY, THE LANDRY NEWS, THE REPORT CARD AND THE LAST HOLIDAY CONCERT. Mr. Clements taught in the public schools near Chicago for seven years before moving East to begin a career in publishing and writing. He lives with his wife in central Massachusetts and has four grown children.  His website is andrewclements.com. 

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Reading Group Guide

Discussion Topics

What's your opinion of how the principal solved the problem between the boys? What would you have done if you'd been the principal? How are conflicts handled in your school? Do you agree with the rules and policies in your school? Why or why not?

Why do you think Phil got so angry when he saw Daniel wearing his brother's jacket? If you were Phil in this story, how would you have reacted when you saw someone wearing your brother's jacket? What would you have done in Daniel's shoes?

Phil thinks "being friends with everyone and being someone's friend are two different things." Do you agree or disagree with him? Why? Describe someone who's your friend. Describe someone who's an acquaintance. What is the same/different about these two people? What makes someone a friend?

Phil wonders how he would have treated Daniel had he been white. Do you think Phil is prejudiced? Why or why not? What does it mean to be prejudiced? Use specific events from the story to support your opinion. How does Phil grow and change as a character from his experiences in this story? What kinds of life lessons does he learn?

Do you think Phil's mom could be prejudiced? Why or why not? What's your opinion about the way that Phil's mom answered his questions about being prejudiced?

Phil's father has some strong feelings about black people in sports. Reread the conversation Phil has with his father about this. What is your opinion? Do you think, "it's all about the black guys"? Why?

Phil realizes that he never knew black kids could live in neighborhoods like his own. He's not sure if he should feel good about this or not. Why? Before reading this story how did you think people of other races lived? What experiences have you had to give you this knowledge?

Activities and Research

Research people who have fought for civil rights for African Americans in the United States. Make a list of these influential people in history. Pick one and write a biography describing the struggles and hardships he/she faced. Share your biography with the class.

While riding the bus, Phil wonders what it would be like for Daniel to ride on his bus. What would it be like for someone of a different race to ride on your school bus? Research Rosa Parks. What experience did she have with riding a bus? If you had been in Rosa Parks' shoes, do you think you could have been as courageous as she was?

In The Jacket, Phil is dealing with some internal struggles regarding his own ideas about racism. Think of another book that you've read where the main character is also dealing with internal struggles. Compare and contrast these two characters and the issues they are facing.

Continue this story and write the next chapter of The Jacket.

Draw or find a picture of a jacket. Write on it, or attach to it, words that come to mind when you think of the story you've just read. Include words that show your opinion of the story and the message it sends to its readers. Display the jackets on a clothesline in your classroom.

Pretend you are a reporter writing a news article about what has happened between Phil and Daniel and the jacket. Give your article a headline. Organize your facts as they would be in a news story with the most important facts listed first and then the supporting details.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 34 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(9)

4 Star

(13)

3 Star

(4)

2 Star

(3)

1 Star

(5)

Your Rating:

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 34 Customer Reviews
  • Posted February 4, 2011

    Not long enough!!

    I bought this book cause it looked okay and it ended up being only 37 pages on my nook! 37! i read a lot so i needed a longer book! they really need to say how long it is in the summary otherwise it is just a rip off to pay $6!!!!!

    6 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 21, 2011

    This Book Is A Great & Highly Recommended - You Should Read It :)

    This Book Is A Great Book Because Explains The Problem very clearly & it gives specific details based On How The Boys Fight Over The Jacket also, it also have to do with segregation because in this book the boy think he is getting picked on because he is a different skinned color. I Think should read this book because its academical & good to read!

    4 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 27, 2005

    Simple Read

    I thought the book was an easy read and very good. Phil was a 6th grader so we can all relate. He accused a younger African-American boy of stealing a jacket. This made Phil ask himself, 'Am I making a big deal out of this because of the jacket or because the boy is a different race?'. This book shows us that we need to get all facts of a situation before we accuse and it makes us ask ourselves if we are racially prejudice.

    4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted March 11, 2011

    whoa

    the overview is like the whole book. i have read it before and thats like almost half or 3/4 of it

    3 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 16, 2002

    Positive Message

    This book gives a positive message on a difficult topic that kids can understand. I used it in my fourth/fifth grade classroom and highly recommend it.

    2 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 1, 2012

    T

    I liked this book but it was only 37 pages this is a rip off this book should be free

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 27, 2012

    Short book

    Too short of a book you pay to much for that little of a book

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted February 24, 2012

    Stupid.

    Stupid book.

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 11, 2012

    WHAT!!!!!!!?

    ONLY 37 PAGES? THATS RIDICICULOUS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 26, 2011

    Only rea the beginning but

    Liked it.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Posted February 18, 2011

    hi

    The overview is super long! And I bet that if the book is only 37 pages long the overview is most of the book. i haven't read the book so the rating is a question mark.

    1 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 4, 2007

    a great read

    great book.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 5, 2005

    Could have been longer!

    I thought this book was okay, you know for little kids like 3rd or 2nd graders. It had a strong message, but didn't show it that much. Like I said, could have been longer. In all good book.

    1 out of 4 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted January 14, 2004

    Compared to all the rest of A.C.'s books...

    This book was okay, but compared to all the other Andrew Clements books, it was sort of bad. Even though I'm an Andrew Clements fan and a book fan, this book wasn't that good. It was just about some jacket that this kid gets from his nana and how another guy thinks that the jacket is his brother's.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted November 4, 2002

    A REALLY STUPID BOOK

    This book was for 1st graders.I thought it was the dumbest book in the world.Clements must have wrote this book in a hurry or something because it was really dumb.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted July 27, 2013

    RJ...

    Ok...there's a person...who shizzes in pplz swimming pools n farts in their faces n POSES AS THEM!!(lmfao) her names isabella*shows u a photo* find her.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted October 28, 2012

    Great book

    This book was really interesting to read. But maybe you should extend the book a little and have a full version. It is great to read. If you haven't started reading the book, then get right to it!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 10, 2012

    warrior cats

    To the people that comment on all books about the stupid warrior cat series, please stop. Its annoying because some people want to read a good review bur instead theres this...

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted June 15, 2012

    This is my pleasure reading

    This is my summer reading but it is also a good pleasure reading book if you like action.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 16, 2012

    Falconwing to moonbeam

    Black tom red eyes excellent hunting and battle skills dont like s*x dirty. (Im only 10 years old) looking for kits too.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 34 Customer Reviews

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