Jackie and Me (Baseball Card Adventure Series)

Jackie and Me (Baseball Card Adventure Series)

4.5 83
by Dan Gutman

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Like every other kid in his class, Joe Stoscack has to write a report on an African American who's made an important contribution to society. Unlike every other kid in his class, Joe has a special talent: with the help of old baseball cards, he can travel through time. So for his report, Joe decides to go back to meet one of the greatest baseball players ever,


Like every other kid in his class, Joe Stoscack has to write a report on an African American who's made an important contribution to society. Unlike every other kid in his class, Joe has a special talent: with the help of old baseball cards, he can travel through time. So for his report, Joe decides to go back to meet one of the greatest baseball players ever, Jackie Robinson, to find out what it was like to be the man who broke baseball's color barrier. Joe plans on writing a prize-winning report. But he doesn't plan on a trip that will for a short time change the color of his skin--and forever change his view of history and his definition of courage.Joe Stoshack has really done it this time. When a pitcher insults his Polish heritage, Joe flings his bat and prompts an on-field brawl that ends in a two-team pileup. he's suspended from Little League...indefinitely. At school, his teacher assigns an oral report for Black History Month. The topic? An African-American who has made a significant contribution to American society. The prize for the best report is four tickets to a cool local amusement park. But Joe doesn't know where to begin. If he could just get his hands on a certain Jackie Robinson baseball card...

Editorial Reviews

Philadelphia Inquirer
Dan Gutman has devised a wonderful mechanism for teaching social history while telling a great tale.
Buffalo News
Pounds home a powerful message about a great man in a kid-friendly way...great play-by-play action.
School Library Journal
Fans of America's favorite pastime will particularly appreciate the details...Full of action, this title will spark history discussions and be a good choice for book reports and leisure reading.
Children's Literature - Donna Freedman
Following up on his successful Honus & Me, Gutman has brought back time-traveling Joe Stoshack. This time, he goes back to 1947 to meet Jackie Robinson-and when he arrives, Joe is an African-American kid. Gutman uses this plot technique to show the reader the kinds of prejudice Robinson endured. In turn, Robinson teaches Joe, through example, that no one can make you feel inferior without your permission. The story is simple yet rewarding, a good bet for a reluctant reader who loves baseball or collects sports cards (there's a subplot about that hobby).

Product Details

HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
Baseball Card Adventure Series
Sold by:
Sales rank:
610L (what's this?)
File size:
2 MB
Age Range:
8 - 12 Years

Read an Excerpt

Jackie & Me AERChapter OneThe Inn

"You can't hit, Stoshack!"Bobby Fuller yelled at me from the pitcher's mound. "You couldn't hit water if you fell off a boat!"

I stepped into the batter's box. Bobby Fuller busted my chops all last season. Now it was our first practice game and he was starting in again. I dug my left toe into the dirt and got set for his first pitch.

"You're ugly, too, Stoshack."

Fuller knows he can rattle me. That's why he does it. My team, the Yellow Jackets, had a one-run lead in the fifth inning. The runners at second and third took their leads. Two outs. A hit would put the game out of reach. Fuller needed to strike me out. I was doing my best not to let him get to me.

"Did I mention stupid?" Fuller asked. I pumped my bat back and forth. "You're stupid, too, Stoshack."

A few of Fuller's teammates snickered. I felt the blood rushing to my face. Try to act like it doesn't bother you, I said to myself. Try to act like it doesn't bother you.

"You gonna take that, Stoshack?" the catcher whispered to me, quietly enough so that even the umpire wouldn't hear. "What kind of a wimp are you?"

It would be so easy. I could just turn around, take my bat, and brain the catcher with it. Do some real damage. His mask would provide only so much protection. That would shut him up. And it would feel so good.

"Stick it in his ear, Bobby!" the shortstop hollered.

The coaches are always telling us about the importance of sportsmanship. The Louisville Little League has strict rules about how we're supposed to act, and what we're allowed to say to the other team during our games. I guess Bobby Fuller and histeammates never got the message. Their coach didn't seem to care.

"You know you can't hit me, Stoshack," Fuller said as he looked in for the sign. "Because you're a big, slow, ugly, dumb Polack!"

That's it.

Call me ugly. Call me stupid. Say I can't hit. But don't make fun of my nationality or you're gonna pay.

I didn't wait for the pitch. I brought the bat back and flung it at Fuller as hard as I could. It went spinning out of my hands and flew toward the pitcher's mound, about thigh high. Fuller freaked. He jumped to avoid the bat shooting toward him. It zipped about an inch below his heels and skittered all the way to second base.

"This ain't hockey, Stoshack," the umpire warned me. "You're out of the game!"

I didn't care. When I saw Fuller skip out of the way of my bat, I lost control. I made a fist and charged the mound. I was ready to rip his head off. Fuller flung away his glove and put his fists up.

"You wanna fight, Stoshack?" he laughed. "I'll kick your butt!"

I could see Fuller's teammates converging on the mound to defend him, but it didn't matter. There could have been a hundred guys out there. I still would have tried to bust Fuller's skull in.

Before I reached the mound, the catcher jumped on my back from behind and knocked me down. By that time, my teammates had rushed off the bench and stormed the field.

I couldn't tell exactly what happened next. I was at the bottom of a pile of bodies. There was a lot of yelling. I felt some punches being thrown at my head. Somebody stepped on my hand. Mostly, it was just the weight of a bunch of kids on top of me.

It took about ten minutes for the coaches to calm everybody down and peel all the kids off the pile. I was the last one to get up. I was okay, but my hand was throbbing. Coach Hutchinson wrapped his burly arm around my shoulder and steered me roughly back to the bench.

"The season hasn't even started yet!" he complained. "What are you trying to do, get yourself suspended?"

I glanced at Fuller. Nobody laid a glove on him. He smirked and turned away. I tore away from Coach Hutchinson and went after Fuller again.

"I'm gonna kill you, Fuller!" I yelled.

This time the umpire tackled me, sending me facefirst into the dirt around home plate. He lay on top of me, not letting me move.

"You got a problem, young man," the ump said in my ear. "You're not gonna play in this league again until you solve it."

Coach Hutchinson was furious with me. So was my mom. The Yellow Jackets forfeited the game. My left pinky was sprained. I was suspended from the Little League indefinitely.

Jackie & Me AER. Copyright © by Dan Gutman. Reprinted by permission of HarperCollins Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved. Available now wherever books are sold.

Meet the Author

Dan Gutman is the author of many books for children, including the My Weird School series, the Flashback Four series, and the  New York Times bestselling Genius Files series. Dan has received nineteen state book awards and ninety-two nominations. Dan lives in New York with his wife, Nina. You can visit him online at  www.dangutman.com.

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Jackie and Me 4.6 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 83 reviews.
c-h-r-i-s-m More than 1 year ago
Two thumbs up for Dan Gutman and the book Jackie and Me. This book is great for any reluctant readers. The book Jackie and Me tells of a kid named Joe Stoshack who travels back in time to 1947 to see Jackie Robinson play ball and see all of the racist people Jackie had to face. The reason why Joe goes back in time is because he has to do a report on Jackie Robinson. When Joe goes back in time he turns into an African American. Joe faces all of the discrimination Jackie had to face from the whites, the fans,and his teammates. Joe takes part in history when he watches Jackie break the color barrier. This is a fantastic story and teaches you a lesson and that is to never let your feelings get the best of you.
EHirs More than 1 year ago
                 Jackie and Me was a surprisingly good book. Dan Gutman wrote a beautifully detailed play-by-play of what happened in 1947. This book is a must read for baseball lovers.                  This book describes how segregation was so harsh then. Jackie Robinson is one of the main reasons that segregation was outlawed, and how we live today. Jackie Robinson made it possible for colored people to play in the Major Leagues. He was the first  baseball player to earn the Rookie of the Year award.                   In this book, Joe Stoshack goes back in time to learn about Jackie Robinson for a history project, but he runs into a bit of trouble back in 1947.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I really like the series and this is one of dans best books yet!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Myself liking cards helped me understand part of it more, but you still will understand and like the book. It is based in1947 in Brooklyn, as the main charecter Joe Stoshstack uses his unique power to travel through time with baseball cards. He finds himself as an african american. And as the dodgers batboy. Paft of his goal is to get some rare baseball cards for his dad. But he forgets them, and you willhave to find out what happens next. Bi!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This is my all time favorite book!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
My 9 year old and I really enjoyed reading this together!
Jack Sullivan More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book was excellent. Following up to Honus and Me, Joe Stostack "stosh" gets another tingling sensation when picking up a 1947 jackie Robinson Rookie Card. He again goes on an amazing adventure this time w the first african american bsball player Jackie Robinson. Ive read the first 6 books in this series and i have to admit this is the one that keep me reading more and is also the most suspensfulllll.... -> ;) Keep Reading.... ;) Soo.. on Jackies 1st day, he gets called some hurtfullllll stuf and is not letting anything get in his way, On the OPPOSITE SIDE<>>> STosh gets into a fight with his BatBoy Boss Ant. Ant is suspicios of Stosh coming from the future and attemps to rip a NEW bseballl card from Stosh-"his ticket home" :(> This book taught me alot and was also an exciting book for a kid who likes baseball, Dan Gutman, and reading. :)
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
I love Jackie Robinson!
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Thats me!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Really good book
RMBDCY More than 1 year ago
My 9-year old grandson loves baseball and needs to do more reading. This series has intrigued him. I've only read a little of the books but they each carry lessons. Jackie & Me examines prejudice, Shoeless Joe & Me is about honesty. The fantasy of the middle-school boy, also named Joe, being able to go back and meet these baseball greats keeps my grandson's interest during his entire reading time.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Great book read with class everyone loved it so much eveyone shoulld get this book because it shows raisism and what Joe Stoshack and jackie robinson have to go through in a twist sort of way very fun
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This book is amazing
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
You should read this it is crazy awesome!!!!!!!!
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Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Both my 11yo(daughter) and 8yo(son) read this book and really loved it. Ironically as they were finishing the book the movie "42" came out in the theaters. We went to see it. Several times they both said "that was in the book!" Knowing that, 8 may be a little young for some of the content. Know your child. My kids are loving this series by Dan Gutman. Already a big fan of the Weird School series.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago