BN.com Gift Guide

Jackie Style

Overview

From the author of the bestselling Audrey Style

Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy Onassis was known by many names, but to us, she is Jackie. And whether she liked it or not, she was, and still is, the most famous woman in the world.

"No one else looked like her, spoke like her, wrote like her, or was so original in the way she did things," said her brother-in-law Senator Edward Kennedy. Her style — what made her Jackie — has been emulated, imitated, even occasionally reviled, but never...

See more details below
Hardcover (New Edition)
$40.61
BN.com price
(Save 9%)$45.00 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (33) from $1.99   
  • New (9) from $23.98   
  • Used (24) from $1.99   
Sending request ...

Overview

From the author of the bestselling Audrey Style

Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy Onassis was known by many names, but to us, she is Jackie. And whether she liked it or not, she was, and still is, the most famous woman in the world.

"No one else looked like her, spoke like her, wrote like her, or was so original in the way she did things," said her brother-in-law Senator Edward Kennedy. Her style — what made her Jackie — has been emulated, imitated, even occasionally reviled, but never fully examined. For the first time, this biography details the singular life that made Jackie an icon and contributed so greatly to her enduring appeal. Drawing on original interviews with Valentino, Hubert de Givenchy, Manolo Blahnik, and Oleg Cassini, as well as close friends C. Z. Guest, George Plimpton, and John Loring, and family members such as Joan Kennedy, Hugh D. Auchincloss, and John Davis, this compelling volume brings to life the private Jackie her family and friends loved.

With one hundred rare color and black-and-white photographs and sketches, and never-before-published personal letters, memos, and essays, Jackie Style re-creates not only Jackie's extraordinary history — fashion being just one part of it — but the world she came from, the White House she revived, the husband and children she adored, the causes she supported, and, finally, the life she chose to lead.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
Translated into six languages, Pamela Clarke Keogh's Audrey Style was a bestseller in several countries. But how does one follow up a tribute to the elegance of Audrey Hepburn? With a similar tribute to Jackie Kennedy Onassis, of course. As in her previous book, Keogh presents an enticing mix of new photographs, classic images, and personal interviews with her subject's family and friends. The freshness of their memories of Jackie definitely enhances this well-coifed pictorial.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780060199524
  • Publisher: HarperCollins Publishers
  • Publication date: 4/28/2001
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 256
  • Sales rank: 427,641
  • Product dimensions: 7.37 (w) x 10.00 (h) x 0.75 (d)

Meet the Author

Pamela Clarke Keogh is the author of Audrey Style, the worldwide bestselling photographic biography of Audrey Hepburn. She was born in Baumbolder, Germany, and raised on the North Shore of Long Island, not far from where Sabrina was filmed. Educated at Vassar College, she worked as a journalist, television producer, and screenwriter. She currently lives in New York City.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

She was very dazzling,
and she made them watch.
She was like an Olympic athlete.


Pat Suzuki

maison blanche



On November 9, 1960, Senator John F. Kennedy of Massachusetts was elected the thirty-fifth president of the United States by 115,000 votes, the slimmest margin since Benjamin Harrison defeated Grover Cleveland in 1888. Kennedy was a fatalist by nature, if not experience, and when he went to bed at 4:30 that morning ("There's nothing more that can be done," he told Bobby), he did not know how the contest would turn out. He had done his best. Now it was up to the American people, or his father's friends in Cook County, or whoever decided these things.

Hours later, his two-and-a-half-year-old daughter, Caroline, prompted by her English nanny, Maud Shaw, marched into her parents' bedroom and woke them with a phrase she could repeat but not fully comprehend: "Good morning, Mr. President."

He was in.

That morning, Jackie did not join in the unabashed optimism at Bobby's house. Wishes came true readily for the children of Joseph P. Kennedy with none of the weight of struggle. They imagined things they could only inchoately express, and their father saw to it that their dreams, as long as they coincided with his, became reality. He was the architect of their lives. Out of the entire clan, Jackie was the first to have some dawning realization of the cost that the presidency would have on her and her little family — that there even was a cost. But Jackie knew, as the worldly Joseph P. did, that every success, even more than failure, had a price.

Her first instinct wasto go outside, away from the Kennedys and their cockeyed sense of entitlement, to turn her back, just for now, on what was expected of her, First lady! She was barely thirhy-one years old. It overwhelmed her. She threw on an old raincoat and headed out the door. Photographer Jacques Lowe looked out the window and saw her go for a walk by the sea. It had just begun to drizzle.

Lowe recalls that "although, like every family and staff member, Jackie had anticipated this moment for a long time, she seemed stunned by the realization that she was now the first lady." Lowe was the only one inside the house to notice Jackie was missing. As he watched, fascinated, a reporter rushed up to her with his hand outstretched in congratulation. "She took the hand but instantly walked on. Nobody else noticed or paid any attention to her. Everyone was too preoccupied and overwhelmed by this triumph after the three long years of reaching for it."

Jackie took a deep breath and walked along the sand, turning her back on what was expected of her. It was good to get away from the furor of the Kennedy Compound. She did not have the obvious bravado of her sisters-in-law, the "rah rah girls," she called them. At Vassar, girls like that playcd field hockey or ran student council. Jackie had never been a joiner, had never needed the approval of her peers. She had the quiet confidence of her intelligence and an innate sense that she could accomplish anything she set out to. With her hands deep in her coat pockets as the wind whipped at her hair, she had the passing thought that her entire life had led to this moment: walking alone on the beach at Hyannisport in her favorite raincoat, knowing her life was about to change.

Mrs. Kennedy, her mother-in-law, was fond of quoting St. Luke: "Those to whom much is given, much is expected." As she steeled herself for the days and months ahead, and the baby she was soon expecting, Jackie had her own thought: There are no accidents.

She knew she would have to fight for a space for herself, her children, and her husband. If she didn't, it would be impossible to maintain any kind of a normal life in the White House, with the Secret Service and all those svcophants hovering around. And the women reporters — harpies, the worst! —wanting to know what she ate, how, she exercised, whose clothes she wore. Regardless of what Jack said, she would give the public what she had to and not a scintilla more. Jackie was not handing her life over to anyone for a vote or the price of a five-cent newspaper.

Since her marriage to Jack, she had seen what living in the public eye could do to you. If you were not careful, it could transform you into a caricature, a reflection of what people read in magazines. Her children, she feared, would become column fodder, written about by some hack on deadline.

"We love Jack!" She had read the signs in the towns they passed and the placards waved at the Democratic convention in Los Angeles, where he was nominated. But Americans were fickle, Jackie knew. They tore down those they admired. She didn't even like politics; she was just in it because of her husband. Winning meant so much to the Kennedys. Like so much else, it came from their father.

On the eve of World War 11, Joseph P. Kennedy had had a disastrous run as American ambassador to the Court of St. James. Nevertheless, the title stuck. Back in the library at the ambassador's big house, Jacques Lowe was trying to corral the adult Kennedys and their spouses for a photo. They were all there: Jack, now called "Mr. President" ("I like the sound of that," he said, smiling. "I could get used to it."); Bobby, who had run the campaign; the ambassador and his wife, Rose, of course; and the girls.

Basking in the success of their brother, who stood in front of the fireplace, his hands characteristically half in and half out of his blazer pockets, they were an uncommonly vibrant group. Peter Lawford, the actor, was off to the side, smiling handsomely.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing all of 12 Customer Reviews
  • Posted May 5, 2010

    For Jackie-o-philes only!

    Most of the info in this book is repetitive although some of it was new & interesting. It would have been nice to have more photos in a book about "style". Also, there is no reason why this book should be so high-priced. Other "Jackie" books are more fun to read since they do have more photographs to admire, and they're not nearly as expensive!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 9, 2001

    Glimpse into Jackie's elegant style

    This book gives a great glimpse into a 20th century icon's legendary style. Also, practical ideas are included for integrating some of Jackie's style mantras into our own lives. However, this book also focuses on more than just the clothes Jackie wore, but how her influenced her fashion, and not the opposite. An interesting read.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 30, 2001

    Jackie Style

    This is like one of those el=cheapo paperback bio's you buy in line at the supermarket; at least that's what the content of the book includes. The packaging of the book includes a hefty price tag that isn't warrented vis a vis what you get. I felt cheated.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 29, 2001

    A moving tribute

    I loved Pamela Clarke Keogh's Audrey Style and am so delighted that she decided to write about another strong, graceful, glorious woman. Ms. Keogh has outdone herself with this remarkable biography, capturing all the varied facets of Jacqueline Onassis' life. This is an exceptionally well-done, beautifully composed book that I will treasure always.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 24, 2001

    Jackie style and Audrey style....

    I love Jackie and Audrey... In this book it has rare photos of jackie that have never been published, I also love Audrey style... it has an introduction by givenchy... I just love the style in that era and I wish it would come back 'in' anways I think you should by this book ITS A GREAT BOOK!!!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 27, 2001

    Jackie Style

    This book reads like sort of a glorified magazine puff piece and, while there are some pretty photographs, it's just a rehash of old Jackie stuff...let the woman rest in peace for God's sake.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 28, 2001

    Jackie Style

    Jackie Style is a really nice book about the incredible life of America's former first lady Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis. It deals not only with her style, wich was so high class, but also with her whole life, and few people have lead a life as interesting as Mrs. Jackie O. This will make a nice mother's day gift for mom's who were around in those times.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 26, 2001

    Another Great Book from Pamela Keogh Clarke

    Jackie Style is a beautiful part pictorial/part biography of Jacqueline Bouvier Kennedy Onassis. There are tons of both black and white and colored photographs along with plenty of text about Jackie's life and her tastes. My favorite section is called 'The Look' where Pamela Keogh Clarke gives tips from Prescriptives makeup artist DARAC on how to achieve some of Jackie's looks (I work as a makeup artist, so this is especially interesting to me). This is a beautiful, wonderful book...definitely a must have for anyone who loves Jackie O or any woman of style...also, if you have not read AudreyStyle, also by Pamela Keogh Clarke, you should pick it up as well...both are FABULOUS!!!

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 26, 2001

    Jackie Style

    This is the umteenth rehash of the same old stories about Jackie Kennedy that everyone has been writing about since the year one. Plus some silly sections about where to go shopping if you want to dress and wear jewelry like Jackie (as if we could afford it, not everyone has a Greek sugar daddy) and make up tips that don't look anything like Jackie's make up... Total rip off

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted May 5, 2001

    OVERPRICED and DULL, DULL, DULL...DON'T WASTE YOUR TIME

    Beginning with the banal useage of Mark Shaw's Official White House photograph upon its cover, this book sets a tone of simple regurgetation from start to finish. Riding on the wave of her previous and similar book devoted to Audrey Hepburn, it's clear this 'sequel' was aimed at pure commercial gains, given the little thought and originality a reader of the former may have anticipated and expected. Instead of Valentino writing a mere introduction, as Mrs. Onassis' longtime friend and couturier, I can't help but wonder why he himself doesn't write and have published a lavish book about all of the many exquisitely beautiful creations he created for her. Instead of a legitimate book devoted to Mrs. Onassis and her style, the purported topic of this book, for which I kept waiting for it to begin and address, instead attempts to combine ALL elements and categories of her style into one slim volume a gross impossibility, the editorial of which is more in the genre of the high School term-paper than any sort of legitimate historical perspective. She chose to bore the reader with her 'interpretation' relating to snipets of the real facts of Mrs. Onassis' life, intermingled with the usual gossip, rumour, innuendo, implied thoughts, unsubstantiated facts, and the odd statement here and there from the likes of Joan Kennedy, C.Z. Guest, and Louis Auchincloss, as if they were exhaustive interviews conducted expressly for this 'book' which is more a pamphlet than anything. Compounding the issue of its editorial content or lack thereof (a fact I can't overstress) is her use of the same old images of Mrs. Onassis, a fact which annoys me, especially, in light of the fact that for ALL of Mrs. Onassis' adult life, especially upon John F. Kennedy's ascendancy to The White House she was THE most famous woman in the world (a full generation prior to Diana, Princess of Wales) and as a result of such a status was stalked by hordes of photographers the world over, yet, in this book you would never know it, one can't help but wonder if all these hordes of photographers got together and shared a bonfire on some remote beach, destroying all their photographs of Mrs. Onassis in some sort of pagan or pop-culture ritual!!! Where are the photographs? Mr. James Spada had access to more images in his book from last year 'Jackie: Her Life in Pictures', why didn't you Ms. Keogh? And why Ms. Keogh, didn't you work harder to bring your readers MUCH, MUCH, more? I for one find your book completely overpriced, obscenely so, and wish that you and your publisher would compensate me for reading it!!!!!!!!!!! Folks, don't waste your time, this book is a loser, wait for it to hit the dollar stacks and then enjoy it. There are a few older and recent books devoted to Mrs. Onassis' style which are far more revelatory and insighful...a few of my favorites are: 'Jacqueline Kennedy In The White House' a charming paperback from 1963; 'The Kennedy White House Parties' by Anne Lincoln, 1967, Viking; 'My Life With Jacqueline Kennedy' by her private secretary, Mary B. Gallagher, 1969; 'Jacqueline Kennedy: The White House Years', by Mary V. R. Thayer, 1971, Little Brown; 'A Thousand Days of Magic: Dressing Jacqueline Kennedy for The White House' by her Official American couturier Oleg Cassini, Rizzoli; 'In The Kennedy Style' by her White House Social Secretary, Letitia Baldridge; 'Jacqueline Kennedy: The White House Years' the catalogue for the exhibition of same name currently mounted by the Costume Institute at The Metropolitan Museum of Art in conjunction with The John F. Kennedy Library) and 'Jackie: The Clothes of Camelot' by Mr. Jay Mulvaney, a book which accomplishes with fun, affection, and visual appeal, what Ms. Keogh's does not. Considering Mrs. Onassis as Pop-Icon there is 'Jackie! The Exploitation of a First Lady' by Irving Shulman and later 'Jackie Under My Skin: Interpreting an Icon' by Mr. Wayne Koestenbaum.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted March 25, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted October 25, 2008

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 12 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)