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Jackson Jones, Book 1: The Tale of a Boy, an Elf, and a Very Stinky Fish [NOOK Book]

Overview

When family reunion day arrives, Jackson, a lonely ten-and-a-half-year-old boy, is loathe to share his room with Great Aunt Harriet. She's a hundred and twelve years old, talks unintelligibly out of her toothless mouth, and has very, very, very big hair. But when he falls into her piles of hair during the night, Jackson encounters a world he'd never dreamed existed. In this magical fantasy complemented by zany illustrations, Jackson meets a host of extraordinary characters and finds that his life, far from being ...

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Jackson Jones, Book 1: The Tale of a Boy, an Elf, and a Very Stinky Fish

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Overview

When family reunion day arrives, Jackson, a lonely ten-and-a-half-year-old boy, is loathe to share his room with Great Aunt Harriet. She's a hundred and twelve years old, talks unintelligibly out of her toothless mouth, and has very, very, very big hair. But when he falls into her piles of hair during the night, Jackson encounters a world he'd never dreamed existed. In this magical fantasy complemented by zany illustrations, Jackson meets a host of extraordinary characters and finds that his life, far from being average and uneventful, is being written by the great Author, in whom all stories find their meaning.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780310399674
  • Publisher: Zonderkidz
  • Publication date: 8/24/2010
  • Sold by: Zondervan Publishing
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 272
  • Sales rank: 557,292
  • Age range: 9 - 12 Years
  • File size: 4 MB

Meet the Author

Jenn Kelly lives in Ottawa, Canada, but her heart lives in Paris. Or Hawaii. She hasn’t decided yet. She is an undercover garden guru, painter, and chef, which has absolutely nothing to do with this book. She won a writing award in grade 4, failed English Lit in university, spent many years writing bad poetry, and then decided to write a book. This is it. She is married to her best friend, Danny, and is mom to a five-year-old boy and a dog who worries too much. She embraces the ridiculousness and disorganization of life.
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Read an Excerpt

Jackson Jones, Book 1


By Jennifer Kelly

Zondervan

Copyright © 2010 Jennifer Kelly
All right reserved.

ISBN: 978-0-310-72284-7


Chapter One

The First Chapter

Jackson didn't know it yet, but in a faraway place, closer than he could imagine, a little creature was sighing in frustration.

This little creature was sighing because she had absolutely no idea what to do. This wasn't a surprise in itself, especially if you knew her. She never had any idea what to do.

The trap door was shut.

Locked, in fact.

It wasn't supposed to be locked.

It was supposed to be unlocked.

And wide open.

She was supposed to unlock it and open it, so that it would no longer be locked and unopened.

But given that Meeka was just that kind of elf, she had forgotten the key.

So there she stood, at the top of a thirty-foot ladder, trying to unlock a trap door with a dead, smelly fish.

Chapter Two

No Longer the First Chapter

Jackson rolled over and opened his eyes. He looked at the clock. Still early. His eyes closed. He began to dream again, but then something tickled his mind. What was so important about today?

Oh yes.

Family reunion day.

Chapter Three

A Chapter that Has a Secret in It

Jackson had a lot of family members.

That didn't mean his dad had four arms or his aunt had twelve legs, but what it did mean was there were a lot of people in his family.

He had a mom, a dad, one brother, one sister, seven aunts, eight uncles, and twenty-four cousins. They were a close family. Jackson saw his family all the time. What with birthdays, anniversaries, soccer games, talent shows, science fairs, and vacations, life was ... insane. And Christmas was just an imbroglio, as you can imagine. (Imbroglio is like when you're playing tag with twenty other kids ... in the kitchen ... and your mom is cooking ... and the dog just threw up.)

However (and this is a rather large however, meaning you are about to read something that is a big deal, so pay attention), HOWEVER, Jackson had just moved. Not just him, but his entire family. Not all of his aunts and uncles and cousins and all of their imbroglios, but just Jackson and his mom, dad, brother, and sister. Not only did they just move, but they moved far, far away. This meant no more imbroglios for a while.

Of course Jackson should have been mad. But as hard as he tried to be mad, he couldn't be. You see, Jackson's mom was a writer. And not just any writer, but a really good one. Not only was she a really good writer, she was also a kind-hearted writer. This meant she didn't turn into one of those writers who demand first-class treatment everywhere they go, like demanding steak and chocolate ice cream on a plane when they are only serving peanuts. But because Jackson's mom was such a good writer, she had to do research in a place that was far away. But the reason Jackson couldn't be mad was because he understood. He understood how important writing was to his mom ... because writing was important to him.

You see, Jackson had a secret. A secret only he and his mom knew about.

Jackson wanted to be a writer too.

Every Sunday night, after church was finished and the huge lunch was finished and they had all gone for a healthy walk, admiring trees and ponds and silly little ducks, after everyone had gone into their own rooms to just "take it down a notch," Jackson would go into his mother's studio, sit in the huge leather chair, and drink hot chocolate while she read his stories and talked to him as a writer, but with the kind heart of a mom. Sometimes they would talk about important things, like what he would write about next, about the clouds they had seen that day, and about how fast he was growing. Maybe growing fast isn't important to a ten-and-a-half-year old, but it's always important to a mom. And sometimes they would talk about unimportant things, such as ... well, actually, there's no such thing as unimportant things to talk about.

But I suppose you're wondering more about Jackson.

Jackson was an average-looking ten-and-a-half-year-old boy. He was a little on the small side. He had blondish-brown hair and his eyes were a bluish- grayish-greenish brown. He did have very straight teeth, however, which meant he had a very nice smile.

Jackson was in sixth grade. Yes, he should have been in fifth grade, but after a ten-minute coffee break (which included an unpleasant piece of fruitcake), the principal decided Jackson would be in sixth grade. They had more desks, you see. That was a ridiculous decision of course, but one makes ridiculous decisions when eating unpleasant cake. Wars have been known to break out over leaders eating dry sponge cake, and there is speculation that King Henry VIII had his fifth wife disposed of because she served him plain white cake instead of the raspberry he craved.

So Jackson didn't really fit in at his new school. All of the other kids had known each other for a long time and Jackson was the new kid. And he was the smallest. He got picked last for games at recess. He made the baseball team only because they were short a player. And when he did play, I'm sorry to tell you, he was terrible. And he knew he was terrible.

Jackson loved to read. It passed the time at recess when he didn't feel like being picked last that day. He also loved writing stories. Oh, the stories he'd written! Jackson was always the hero, of course.

The unassuming hero who stepped in at the last minute to save the universe.

The unassuming hero who saved the entire village from a raging fire.

The unassuming hero who saved the cat up the tree, received a medal from the mayor, and got a thank-you parade that included those old guys who drove around in little cars.

The unassuming hero who could figure out algebra.

(Continues...)



Excerpted from Jackson Jones, Book 1 by Jennifer Kelly Copyright © 2010 by Jennifer Kelly. Excerpted by permission of Zondervan. All rights reserved. No part of this excerpt may be reproduced or reprinted without permission in writing from the publisher.
Excerpts are provided by Dial-A-Book Inc. solely for the personal use of visitors to this web site.

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Table of Contents

Contents

1. The First Chapter....................11
2. No Longer the First Chapter....................13
3. A Chapter that Has a Secret in It....................15
4. A Chapter that Involves an Awful Mishap with a Kangaroo....................19
5. A Very Hairy Chapter....................21
6. In Which We Learn about Diplomacy....................25
7. In Which This Book Begins....................27
8. In Which This Book Really Begins....................29
9. In Which There Will Be Absolutely No Crying....................35
10. In Which Nothing Makes Sense....................37
11. In Which We Meet Meeka and Her Dead, Smelly Fish....................41
12. In Which the Tour Begins....................45
13. In Which We Enter the Book Room....................47
14. The Chapter after That....................51
15. In Which There Are Too Many Books (As if That's Possible)....................55
16. In Which There Is Frustration, Annoyance, Irritation, and Exasperation....................63
17. In Which We Find a Doorknob....................65
18. In Which We Visit the Cafeteria....................67
19. In Which There Is a Lot of Meat....................73
20. WARNING: There Is Throw Up in This Chapter!....................77
21. In Which There Is an Important Conversation....................81
22. ANOTHER WARNING: This Chapter Has Gargantuan, Hairy-Backed Spiders in It!....................85
23. A Really Short Chapter....................89
24. A Rather Long Chapter....................91
25. In Which There Is a Bathroom Break....................99
26. In Which Jackson Cannot Believe His Eyes....................101
27. A Very Sticky Chapter....................103
28. A Chapter with Lots of Shrieking (Perhaps You Should Put in Earplugs before Continuing)....................107
29. In Which There Is a Great Deal of Important Talk. Also, Feathers....................111
30. In Which We Need a Key. Do You Happen to Have One We Could Borrow?....................113
31. In Which We Meet a Scowl....................115
32. A Chapter That Has Many Portraits....................117
33. In Which Jackson Wonders if He's Losing His Mind....................123
34. In Which Nothing Particularly Important Happens....................125
35. In Which Something Small Happens....................127
36. In Which There Is Another Room....................129
37. In Which We Learn about the Book, the Author, and Fred the Turtle....................131
38. A Chapter that Is Not Nearly as Long as the Last One....................145
39. I Bet You Thought I Forgot....................147
40. In Which There Is a Secret....................149
41. In Which the Writer Prepares You....................153
42. A Chapter that Requires a Key Again....................155
43. In Which the Story Continues....................159
44. A Chapter that Is Terribly Mean....................161
45. A Chapter that Is Even More Mean....................163
46. In Which No One Can Find a Light Switch....................165
47. A Chapter that Explains a Lot....................167
48. In Which the Quest Begins....................179
49. A Chapter that Involves More Questing....................181
50. A Very Gloomy Chapter....................185
51. In Which a Hero Is Needed....................189
52. In Which Steps Are Taken to Become a Hero....................191
53. A Chapter that Is a Little Scary....................193
54. In Which a Hero Is Born....................197
55. In Which We Wait for Death....................199
56. In Which We Meet Another Hero....................201
57. In Which No One Dies....................203
58. In Which There Is a Great Deal of Dancing....................205
59. In Which Meeka Is Bossy....................209
60. In Which Jackson Hurries....................211
61. In Which No Questions Are Answered....................213
62. In Which a Heart Hurts....................215
63. In Which Things Are Not as They Seem....................219
64. A Chapter that Explains the Author ... Even More!....................223
65. In Which Jackson May Drink Bugs....................233
66. In Which They Rush Home....................237
67. In Which Jackson Hits the Floor....................239
68. A Chapter that Has a Key, a Book, and a Picture....................241
69. In Which Jackson Has an Idea....................243
70. A Chapter that Involves the High Price of Lattes....................247
71. A Chapter that Involves Anticipation, a Car Ride, and Cow Poop....................249
72. A Chapter that Has More Words in the Title than in the Chapter....................251
73. In Which a House Is Found....................253
74. In Which Birds Are Very Loud....................257
75. In Which Jackson Finds Another Door....................259
76. A Chapter that Involves Another Place....................261
77. In Which We Learn More....................263
78. In Which We Learn Even More....................265
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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 4.5
( 14 )
Rating Distribution

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(12)

4 Star

(1)

3 Star

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2 Star

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Sort by: Showing all of 14 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 1, 2013

    Mr. Perezs class

    7th grade math

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  • Posted July 26, 2013

    This was a great book to read. It was funny and took you on an i

    This was a great book to read. It was funny and took you on an interesting adventure. Loved every part of it. There should be more books like this!

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  • Posted August 4, 2011

    Fantastic, Funny, Wonderful Adventure!! Can't wait for more Jackson Jones!

    First off, I would like to recommend this book not only to 9 - 12 year olds (the age category it was filed under), but also for parents to read to younger children. It isn't a scary story, it's an adventure, and I know that my child would have loved this book from as early as age 6! I am a mom to one girl in 4th grade and I recently bought this book and tucked it away for some special occasion. The reason I bought it? Well, the illustration on the cover was great, the description of the book sounded interesting, and of course, you just can't read that title without wondering what sort of adventure a boy, elf and a stinky fish would have in an old lady's hair! Anyway, my daughter came home from school the next week telling me that she needed to choose a book for a book report at school. She loves to read, but couldn't think of a book she wanted to do the report on, so I pulled out this book. At first she thought it might be "too boyish", but I suggested that she just listen to the first chapter and then decide. Well, we were both hooked immediately! When she would take it to school with her, I would have to ask what chapters she'd read without me so that I was able to get caught up before we read that night. I didn't want to miss a thing! My daughter and I thoroughly enjoyed this book for many reasons. It is fun and entertaining, and also has a great moral foundation. We both looked very foward to reading about Jackson's adventure together every night, and we can't wait to pick up the next book!!

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  • Posted June 15, 2011

    I Also Recommend:

    Wonderful read. Great for kids, adults and kids at heart.

    Sometimes, a book comes along that is silly, funny and has a great message to boot. This is that book. Sure, Kirkus may think it's a tangled mess, but really what do they know about fun. I loved it. I'm really just a big kid at heart and I'm sure other kids will love it too. It makes kids think about themselves as a part of a bigger story. There is something bigger out there and we can all be a part of it.

    Bottom line: Buy this book and wear it out. It's fun and couldn't we all use a little more of that?

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 30, 2011

    WEIRD,dont buy

    i thought that it would be a fun kids book. i was wrong. the plot is very hard to follow. dont recommend

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  • Posted January 12, 2011

    g

    j

    0 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted December 31, 2010

    i dont now

    serilesey i dont now?.?.?.?.?.?.?.?.?.

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted September 30, 2010

    Silly, Fun for Boys that Moms will LOVE!

    Jackson Jones: The Tale of a Boy, an Elf, and a Very Stinky Fish is the story of ten-year-old Jackson Jones, a young boy who is struggling to fit in at a new school after his family's recent move far away from all that was familiar to him: his home; his friends; and his very large, very involved extended family. It is the story of a boy's search for his identity, for his "story."

    Jackson is a quiet boy, a loner, a book worm, an aspiring author, a young man unsure of himself, his choices, and his future... until the day he falls into Great Aunt Harriet's hair. Yes, that's right. He falls into Great Aunt Harriet's GIANT hair and finds a whole new world, a world with elves, keys, doors, and ok, you knew it had to be coming, right?... a stinky fish.

    The author is the mother of a young boy, and after reading this book, both of my boys are convinced that she must be one wild, crazy, and FUN mom! And, I am prone to agree! Jackson Jones: the Tale of a Boy, and Elf, and a Very Stinky Fish is written so that the reader feels that he is sitting down with the author and listening to her tell a story. There are interruptions as the author commiserates with the reader about having to put the book down after the cliff-hanger ending the previous chapter; congratulates readers alternating turns with their parents on lucking out in drawing a short chapter to read; and prepares the reader for an important chapter, an integral event, or a surprising turn in the story. There are breaks when the author stops to define a "sixth grade" vocabulary word or encourages the reader to use his imagination, to visualize, and to dream. And there are is laugh after laugh as Jackson meets a host of interesting characters in Great Aunt Harriet's world!

    Jackson Jones: the Tale of a Boy, and Elf, and a Very Stinky Fish was as fun for me to read to the boys as it was for them to listen. We couldn't help but laugh at the story, the author, and the hilarious titles of the 78 chapters... my favorite: Chapter 15 In Which There are Too Many Books (as if That's Possible), or maybe Chapter 16 In Which There is Frustration, Annoyance, Irritation and Exasperation. The boys' favorite: hmmm... that's hard, maybe: Chapter 7 In Which the Book Really Begins... they thought reading 6 chapters before the book "really begins" was just over-the-top funny!

    For all of its hilarity, this book also relays an important, though not heavy-handed, message to young boys... and girls, the message that each of them is created by "the Author;" each of them has a story to write, a life to live. It reassures children that although they will not be masters at everything they attempt, they each have strengths individual to them and it is their duty to develop these strengths and to use them to make a difference in their lives and the lives of those around them. In the end, quiet, uncertain, loner Jackson learns that he holds the key to making a difference in both his own life, and in the lives of those he loves, including Great Aunt Harriet!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 13, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 8, 2010

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted February 22, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 21, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 3, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 30, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

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