Jacob the Liar

( 1 )

Overview

Back in print, here is the classic work from one of the giants of German postwar literature and the basis for the major motion picture Jakob the Liar, starring Robin Williams.

In the ghetto, possession of a radio is punishable by death.

Read More Show Less
... See more details below
Paperback (Reprint)
$12.48
BN.com price
(Save 16%)$14.95 List Price

Pick Up In Store

Reserve and pick up in 60 minutes at your local store

Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (20) from $2.99   
  • New (14) from $2.99   
  • Used (6) from $2.99   
Sending request ...

Overview

Back in print, here is the classic work from one of the giants of German postwar literature and the basis for the major motion picture Jakob the Liar, starring Robin Williams.

In the ghetto, possession of a radio is punishable by death.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Times Literary Supplement
“A novel about the martyrdom of Europe’s Jews that has never been surpassed.”
The New York Times Book Review
“An unforgettably beautiful novel . . . Cuts to the very heart of human experience.”
Boston Globe
“One of the enduring works of the Shoah . . . This miraculous novel pays profound homage to remembrance.”
The New Yorker
“Creative storytelling . . . Asks us to weigh the human need for hope in all its real and imagined forms.”
Times Literary Supplement
“A novel about the martyrdom of Europe’s Jews that has never been surpassed.”
Time Magazines Literary Supplement
“A novel about the martyrdom of Europe’s Jews that has never been surpassed.”
Publishers Weekly - Publisher's Weekly
Twenty-seven years after its initial German publication, this celebrated-and out-of-print-novel of life and death in a Nazi-occupied Jewish ghetto during WW II appears here in the translation authorized by the author, a Jewish Holocaust survivor. In the midst of a morally inverted universe where the monstrously wicked has become utterly commonplace, Jacob Heym, a yellow star on his chest, gives hope to his fellow ghetto occupants by telling them he has clandestinely overheard a radio report that Russian troops are advancing and will soon liberate the ghetto. One life-sustaining lie leads to another as the former eatery owner, who now does back-breaking forced labor in a freight yard, circulates invented radio news of German defeats and Allied progress. Jacob's stories halt a stream of suicides, even though savage beatings, shootings, executions, starvation and deportations to concentration camps continue unabated. In a moving, almost hallucinatory, narrative that gives voice to a grief beyond words, Becker shows us ordinary people struggling to maintain their humanity and dignity. Vennewitz's translation conveys the restraint and emotional power of a story that unfolds with the impact of a moral parable or a folk legend. Feb.
Library Journal
It is 1943, and existence for Jews in the ghetto is grim. Deportations in cattle cars have begun, and daily life is overseen by cruel guards who have imposed severe restrictions. Jakob hauls crates for the Germans; most of the semblance of his former life is gone. Because he was out after curfew, he is brought before an official in the German military office, where he overhears a radio (like pets, rings, plants, and clocks, radios are forbidden in the ghetto). From the radio, Jakob learns that Russian tanks are advancing on his town and that the liberators are in fact only 400 kilometers away. This news, which he can't contain, transfixes the ghetto. Suicides stop; weddings are planned. As Jakob is prodded for more news, he begins supplying information from a radio that now exists only in his imagination (hence the title). But though the deportations continue, hope now lives in the ghetto. A masterful novel of European Jews, their plight, and the role of illusion.-- Molly Abramowitz, Silver Spring, Md.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781611457865
  • Publisher: Arcade Publishing
  • Publication date: 6/4/2013
  • Edition description: Reprint
  • Pages: 256
  • Sales rank: 704,713
  • Product dimensions: 5.50 (w) x 8.10 (h) x 0.80 (d)

Meet the Author

Jurek Becker was born in Lodz, Poland, in 1937. A Holocaust survivor, he was one of the very few Jews to remain in Germany after the war. He became an internationally acclaimed novelist, short story writer, and screenwriter and died in 1997.

Leila Vennewitz was the distinguished translator of Heinrich Böll and other postwar German writers, including Jurek Becker and Martin Walser. She won numerous awards for her translations. She died in 2007.

Louis Begley is the award-winning author of Wartime Lies, About Schmidt, and many other acclaimed novels and works of nonfiction.

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Average Rating 5
( 1 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(1)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews
  • Posted December 1, 2012

    A Humoresque Tragedy: A Realistic yet Different Take on the Topic of the Holocaust!

    I had to read this book for my World Literature Class in College and it was phenomenal! Who knew it would take one person who survived the ghettos of Poland to take this weighty subject matter and turn it into a work of art. Before you read this, please research his life and his reasons and history behind the book itself; it will clear up any questions you have. This book does keep the reality and tension of the subject matter to a T. My review is to not to tell you the story it's for you to understand that this book is essential in the history (Literary history and personal response to) of the Holocaust and the ghettos of Poland

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
Sort by: Showing 1 Customer Reviews

If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
Why is this product inappropriate?
Comments (optional)