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Jake Starts School

Overview

It’s Jake’s first day of school.

He doesn’t want his mom and dad to leave him there, alone.

Now, Jake and his parents have to spend the first day of school together. Finger painting. Sharing snacks. Playing on the seesaw.

Will Jake ever be able to stay at school on his own?

The answer will delight and reassure children and their (anxious) ...

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Overview

It’s Jake’s first day of school.

He doesn’t want his mom and dad to leave him there, alone.

Now, Jake and his parents have to spend the first day of school together. Finger painting. Sharing snacks. Playing on the seesaw.

Will Jake ever be able to stay at school on his own?

The answer will delight and reassure children and their (anxious) parents!

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Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
It is Jake's first day of school. Although his parents try to cheer him up, his apprehension is evident. Adequate humorous rhymes describe his terror; he screams and flees when he meets his teacher, then attaches himself permanently to his parents' knees. This makes class activities difficult for Jake, from finger painting to playing on the seesaw, to using the bathroom. At the end of the school day, his teacher takes out a book to read to the class, one about a dog named Fred. This makes Jake turn around and note quietly that he has a dog named Fred. He is persuaded to let go of his relieved parents in order to hold the book while the teacher reads. Jake finally feels good inside. The cartoon-y characters seem to occupy a surreal world filled with mundane school buses, classrooms and children. The double-page, exaggeratedly humorous visuals, some quite outrageous, distinguish the tale from the usual first-day-of-school story. The brief, large-print text is supplemented with speech balloons and other asides. And of course the happy ending is reassuring to fearful youngsters. Reviewer: Ken Marantz and Sylvia Marantz
School Library Journal

PreS-Gr 1

The over-the-top humor of Jake Stays Awake (Feiwel & Friends, 2007) continues as Jake begins school. He and his pushover parents end up spending the first day of school trying to share tiny chairs, seesaw rides, and even a tricycle, since Jake will not let go of Mom and Dad. He finally relaxes when the teacher reads a story about a dog named Fred. "I have a dog. His name is Fred," Jake says. Fears forgotten, he walks to the front of the room and holds the book for his teacher. The computer-generated cartoon illustrations are full of unusual angles and bug-eyed, bullet-headed people. The sing-songy rhyming text describes Jake's actions (including passing gas) but never really makes clear why he's so terrified. The story might seem funny to parents or to older children, but is unlikely to reassure the target audience of kids who are just starting school.-Heidi Estrin, Feldman Children's Library at Congregation B'nai Israel, Boca Raton, FL

Kirkus Reviews
Bug-eyed Jake is back (Jake Stays Awake, 2007) with another problem in this very funny addition to the canon of stories about starting kindergarten. "Then there it was, Room Number 1, / where Jake would join his class. / It looked so big, he felt so small, / he passed a little gas." When he grabs them around their legs and won't let go, Jake's incredibly patient parents have no choice but to accompany him to class. The two pointy-headed parents look utterly ridiculous when uncomfortably squeezed into a youngster's chair with a terrified looking Jake on top of them. Much to his parents' relief, the teacher finds something to which Jake can relate, and he makes the transition to successful kindergartener. Wright's background in cartoons and film is clearly evident, and his eccentric portrayal of people who all look like giant thumbs with arms and legs is his trademark. The preposterously shaped characters, pithy rhymes and the many emotions expressed by just a few differently drawn lines make this an enjoyable graphic experience. (Picture book. 4-6)
From the Publisher
Praise for Jake Starts School:

“Bug-eyed Jake is back with another problem in this very funny addition to the canon of stories about starting kindergarten . . . Wright’s background in cartoons and film is clearly evident, and his eccentric portrayal of people who all look like giant thumbs with arms and legs is his trademark. The preposterously shaped characters, pithy rhymes and the many emotions expressed by just a few differently drawn lines make this an enjoyable graphic experience.” —Kirkus Reviews

“Michael Wright’s bright, bold illustrations in Jake Starts School look like they are a cartoon!  The book is full of humor and funny bird’s-eye view perspectives, and it’s Homer Simpson-esque in a good, ages four-to-seven kind of way.” —Bookpage

“The author uses gentle humor to portray an extreme case of separation anxiety and show how absurd it would be to not actually separate.” —San Francisco Chronicle

"A hilarious tale of nerves." —New York Post

 

“The double-page, exaggeratedly humorous visuals, some quite outrageous, distinguish the tale from the usual first-day-of-school story. The brief, large-print text is supplemented with speech balloons and other asides. And of course the happy ending is reassuring to fearful youngsters.” —Children’s Literature

“The over-the-top humor of Jake Stays Awake (Feiwel & Friends, 2007) continues as Jake begins school. He and his pushover parents end up spending the first day of school trying to share tiny chairs, seesaw rides, and even a tricycle, since Jake will not let go of Mom and Dad.” —School Library Journal

Praise for Jake Stays Awake:

“Co-sleeping taken to the extreme is the topic of this debut. Wright’s illustrations hysterically expand upon the text. The characters’ small eyes and elongated heads make for very droll facial expressions, while hidden details and the family dog’s antics will keep readers in stitches. Co-sleeping parents who want to reclaim their territory may want to take notes.” —Kirkus Reviews

“Pleasantly rhyming text is paired with droll, stylized full- and double-page illustrations in bold colors and varying perspectives, and sight gags extend the fun for children and adults. All in all, a delicious treat of a bedtime book.” —School Library Journal

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780312608842
  • Publisher: Square Fish
  • Publication date: 7/20/2010
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 48
  • Sales rank: 337,598
  • Age range: 4 - 7 Years
  • Product dimensions: 8.86 (w) x 10.09 (h) x 0.18 (d)

Meet the Author

Michael Wright is the author and illustrator of the picture books Jake Stays Awake and Jake Goes Peanuts. He has worked in advertising as a copywriter and art director, creating some of the most memorable fish sticks commercials you’ve ever seen, and he has also worked designing animation and sets for television. He lives in Manhattan Beach, California, with his wife, Cheryl, and three children, Mason, Sloane, and Paxton, all of whom survived their first days of school.

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Read an Excerpt

Then there is was, Room Number 1,

where Jake would join his class.

It looked so big, he felt so small,

he passed a little gas.

Read More Show Less

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