Jake Stays Awake

Jake Stays Awake

4.6 3
by Michael Wright
     
 

Jake can't sleep.
He climbs into bed with his mom and dad.
Now Jake's parents can't sleep.
Even the dog is awake.
This family needs a good night's rest. Where can they sleep?
The answer will delight and reassure children and their (sleep-deprived) parents!

Overview

Jake can't sleep.
He climbs into bed with his mom and dad.
Now Jake's parents can't sleep.
Even the dog is awake.
This family needs a good night's rest. Where can they sleep?
The answer will delight and reassure children and their (sleep-deprived) parents!

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

“Pleasantly rhyming text is paired with droll, stylized full- and double-page illustrations in bold colors and varying perspectives, and sight gags extend the fun for children and adults....All in all, a delicious treat of a bedtime book.” —School Library Journal

“Co-sleeping taken to the extreme is the topic of this debut....Wright's illustrations hysterically expand upon the text. The characters' small eyes and elongated heads make for very droll facial expressions, while hidden details and the family dog's antics will keep readers in stitches. Co-sleeping parents who want to reclaim their territory may want to take notes.” —Kirkus Reviews

“The illustrations, done in a distinctive cartoon style, feature aerial or skewed perspectives and figures with chinless, thumb-shaped heads; except for his height, Jake looks grown up--which adds another layer of humor, intended or otherwise, to the episode.” —Booklist

“Turn[s] children's bedtime ploys on their ears....The characters, with their oblong heads and expressive dot-and-line features, seem at once both oddly familiar and utterly unique....Scenes of the family lined up under a blanket on the home's rooftop (the dog dangling for dear life), shoehorned into the bathtub or stretched out on the kitchen counter will have both children and parents laughing at the lengths to which they will go for some shuteye.” —Shelf Awareness

“Buoyantly written and drawn in an exaggerated cartoon style, Jake Stays Awake is a fun, funny look at a problem that plagues most parents.” —Oklahoma Gazette

“The cinematic angles, saturated page colors, and stylistic drawings of the characters in Jake Stays Awake add a unique flavor to Wright's bedtime story about a kid who can't sleep unless he's with his parents.” —Manhattan Beach Easy Reader

“Wright's illustrations suggest the kind of cartoon/graphic feel of the advertising world that he came from, and it may not be an accident that the child is shown as a short adult.” —Children's Literature

Children's Literature - Mary Hynes-Berry
Getting children to sleep, especially getting them to sleep in their own beds, can be a major challenge in many households. In Michael Wright's story, Mom and Dad are finally driven to proclaim that Jake can sleep with them anywhere but in their bed. Some children and their parents may find the clearly exaggerated options humorous, as Jake drags the trio from bedding down on the rooftop to trying to settle into garbage cans or lying in the bathtub. Others will be more annoyed than amused at how the parents' depiction as being ineffective and passive—in the end, it is Jake who decides that his own bed is more comfortable than these alternatives. Wright's illustrations suggest the kind of cartoon/graphic feel of the advertising world that he came from, and it may not be an accident that the child is shown as a short adult. If nothing else, Wright's story makes it clear that parent/child problems around issues like bedtime can usually be traced to the parents' enabling behavior. Reviewer: Mary Hynes-Berry
School Library Journal

PreS-Gr 1
"Unless I can sleep with my parents," says Jake, "I won't close my eyes, and I won't go to bed!" Night after night, his parents resist, then relent. Sleeplessness ensues until mother and father come up with a plan-"We'll sleep with you, son, just not in our bed./Is there some other place we could try out instead?" The sleeping venues he suggests include a steep roof, the staircase, the bathtub, the kitchen counter, three garbage cans, and the family car. Wakeful Jake decides none of these will do as well as his own bed into which he finally tumbles, exhausted. And the moral of the story is: "it's not always fun/to have kids sleep with parents/night after night./But every once in awhile?/Well, that's quite all right." Pleasantly rhyming text is paired with droll, stylized full- and double-page illustrations in bold colors and varying perspectives, and sight gags extend the fun for children and adults. Mom's bedside reading is Passions Harvest ; Jake's dog, which appears in every spread, is loyal to the point of hanging onto the edge of the roof by his front paws; and the boy's wide-eyed teddy bear stays clutched in Jake's hand until the very end, when he serves as a sleep mask for the pooch. Endpapers of floating sheep echo the pattern on Jake's pajamas and subtly suggest an alternative method of falling asleep. All in all, a delicious treat of a bedtime book.
—Marie OrlandoCopyright 2006 Reed Business Information.

Kirkus Reviews
Co-sleeping taken to the extreme is the topic of this debut. Jake refuses to go to sleep without his parents. All well and good when he was small, but he now appears to be about five years old, and takes up quite a large amount of space in his parents' bed. "We love you, dear Jake, / but we can't even doze. / How can we sleep / with your toes / up our nose?" In desperation for a good night's sleep, they agree to sleep with Jake, just not in their bed. The trio then begins the search for a comfy spot. The roof is too steep, the stairs too hard, and they all get stuck in the bathtub. Place after place is just plain wrong . . . until Jake thinks of a place he hadn't considered before-his own bed. The habit broken, the author reassures his audience that sleeping together is all right once in a while, just not every night. Wright's illustrations hysterically expand upon the text. The characters' small eyes and elongated heads make for very droll facial expressions, while hidden details and the family dog's antics will keep readers in stitches. Co-sleeping parents who want to reclaim their territory may want to take notes. (Picture book. 3-7)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780312367978
Publisher:
Feiwel & Friends
Publication date:
10/28/2007
Edition description:
First Edition
Pages:
40
Product dimensions:
9.21(w) x 11.22(h) x 0.38(d)
Age Range:
4 - 7 Years

Read an Excerpt

There was a little boy

whose name was Jake

and every night

he’d stay awake.

“Unless I can sleep

with my parents,” he said,

“I won’t close my eyes,

and I won’t go to bed!”

So every night around ten forty-four,

he’d wander on up to his mom and dad’s door,

and stand there and knock, till they finally said,

“All right, all right, Jake! You can sleep in our bed.”

Meet the Author

Michael Wright is the author and illustrator of the picture books Jake Starts School and Jake Goes Peanuts. He has worked in advertising as a copywriter and art director, creating some of the most memorable fish sticks commercials you've ever seen, and he has also worked designing animation and sets for television. He lives in Manhattan Beach, California with his wife Cheryl and three kids Mason, Sloane and Paxton, all of whom are now very good sleepers.

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Jake Stays Awake 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Sandy5 More than 1 year ago
Jake can’t sleep in his own bed so he sleeps with his parents. In his sheep onesie he crawls into bed with them but now they can’t sleep so they decide they will have Jake pick out places in the house where they can bed down for the night. Jake is quite creative, but not practical as he chooses unique sleeping arrangements like up on the roof, on the stairs, in the bathtub, and in the kitchen where he can snack on donuts all night long. There are a few other places Jake chooses for the family to try but they all have obstacles that must be dealt with and a good sleep is not something the family gets that night. Jake finally has a light-bulb moment one night and he leaves his parents snoring behind as he walks himself to another room as he catches some zzz’s. The story is told in rhyme and I like the font style and the flow of the story. The pictures are cute and the attention to detail is one that children will enjoy. Oh, we can’t forget the dog; Jake’s pup is in on the adventure too.
kathansmom More than 1 year ago
Our son sleeps in our bed to so we could relate to this book. Great book. Funny and my 2 1/2 yr old loves it. Will be giving this book as future gifts.
Guest More than 1 year ago
I love this children's book. The illustrations crack you up and all kids can relate to the story.