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Jam & Honey
     

Jam & Honey

by Laura J. Bryant, Melita Morales
 

A little girl is on her way to gather berries, berries to make jam when she gets home. A little bee is on its way to gather nectar, nectar to make honey for her honeycomb. Their meeting in the same berry patch shines a gentle light on a common childhood fear from two points of view. This picture book provides a sweet way to convey even to the youngest child the

Overview

A little girl is on her way to gather berries, berries to make jam when she gets home. A little bee is on its way to gather nectar, nectar to make honey for her honeycomb. Their meeting in the same berry patch shines a gentle light on a common childhood fear from two points of view. This picture book provides a sweet way to convey even to the youngest child the importance of understanding and respecting all creatures.

Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
PreS—This rhyming story about a girl and a bee starts with "The Girl": "I'm going to pick berries,/all by myself,/enough to fill the bucket/high on the shelf." She heads down a city street (followed by her watchful mom) to what appears to be a community garden, picks the fruit, meets the bee, and heads home to make jam. The second part, "The Bee," follows the same pattern from the insect's point of view: "I'm going to get nectar, all on my own…." When the girl and the bee meet, they are frightened, but reassured that if they leave each other alone, all will be fine. The story is simplicity itself. It scans well, and while not superlative, is pleasant. The parallel stories are a nice twist and introduce themes of working together with nature. Sweetly appealing watercolor and pencil illustrations never cross into saccharine. The little girl is reminiscent of Nancy Poydar's characters, and the full-bleed spreads give a sense of the city and the characters' emotions. Done from a variety of vantage points, the artwork draws listeners through the plot.—Amy Lilien-Harper, The Ferguson Library, Stamford, CT
Kirkus Reviews
A chance for readers to fly a mile in a bee's shoes. The first half of the book follows a young girl as she goes to an urban park to pick berries. Morales' rhythms bounce: "When I come home / we'll make a treat, / sweet jam on toast / for me to eat." But although the girl loves the berries and doesn't mind the thorns, she is afraid of the bees. She follows her mom's advice, though, and stays still when one flies near—it's the nectar the bee wants, not her. The second half follows a bee on a parallel quest: "We'll make honey / when I come home, / sweet honey to fill / our honeycomb." Her mom has similar advice for her fear of people—humans just want berries, so fly high. Bryant's softly colored watercolor-and-pencil illustrations nicely juxtapose the two perspectives. The girl's rosy cheeks, headscarf and metal bucket lend an old-fashioned charm to the present-day urban setting. Good medicine for those unreasonably afraid of bees and a subtle message about sharing the Earth.(Picture book. 3-6)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781582462998
Publisher:
Random House Children's Books
Publication date:
01/25/2011
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
1,382,232
Product dimensions:
8.60(w) x 9.80(h) x 0.50(d)
Lexile:
AD730L (what's this?)
Age Range:
3 - 7 Years

Read an Excerpt

The Girl:
I'm going to pick berries, all by myself,
enough to fill the bucket high on the shelf.
When I come home, we'll make a treat,
sweet jam on toast for me to eat.

The scratchy branches could scrape my knees,
but I'm more scared of the buzzing bees.
Mama says hold still, they will fly away.
Bees want nectar, so I'll be okay!

The Bee:
I'm going to get nectar, all on my own,
nectar from the vines where the flowers have grown.
We'll make honey when I come home,
sweet honey to fill our honeycomb.

Through scratchy branches I can duck and dive.
It's people that scare me when I leave the hive.
Mama says fly high, they will move away.
People want berries, so I'll be okay!

Meet the Author

Melita Morales is an art educator, artist, performing arts presenter, and art house curator. She holds degrees in art and secondary school education and teaches art at Marin County Day School. About her first books, she writes: "I often watch students and adults jump up from a picnic and sprint away from food to escape a buzzing bee. The book arose from an understanding that bees are critical to our biodiversity. Besides that, they give us the delicious treat of honey!" This is her first book.

Laura J. Bryant was born and raised in south Florida and attended The Maryland Institute College of Art. Laura has illustrated numerous books including Tractor Day, Kitty Cat Kitty Cat Are You Waking Up? and the best-selling book, God Gave Us You. Her books have garnered a number of awards including the Bank Street College Best Book of the Year (3 times).

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