Jamaica's Blue Marker

Jamaica's Blue Marker

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by Juanita Havill, Anne Sibley O'Brien
     
 

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When Jamaica hears that Russell is moving away, she isn't sorry, since he was often mean to her. But then she begins to think of how she might feel if she were moving. "Havill here gives children insight into the phenomenon of acting out, where a child's distress about one aspect of life comes out in an unexpected way; Jamaica behaves realistically throughout,…  See more details below

Overview

When Jamaica hears that Russell is moving away, she isn't sorry, since he was often mean to her. But then she begins to think of how she might feel if she were moving. "Havill here gives children insight into the phenomenon of acting out, where a child's distress about one aspect of life comes out in an unexpected way; Jamaica behaves realistically throughout, expressing her anger, but finding a way to reconcile with Russell before he leaves." -- Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature - Dia L. Michels
Jamaica takes pride in her drawing in art class. Then the teacher comes along and asks Jamaica to lend her markers to Russell, the class troublemaker. Reluctantly she complies with the teacher's request. Then Russell takes the blue marker she was forced to give him, and scribbles all over her perfect drawing! Jamaica cannot tolerate this "mean brat." When she learns that Russell and his family are moving, she is glad for her own sake. As she sees it, he does not deserve a good-bye card from her. But Jamaica learns that kindness, not rejection, is what Russell needs. O'Brien's soft, realistic illustrations highlight the innocence depicted in this story.
Children's Literature - Susie Wilde
Sometimes young girls can learn by seeing a story child work through a difficulty. Jamaica, probably the most realistically drawn character in children's literature, stars in her fourth adventure. As usual, Jamaica has feelings and they aren't pretty. In this story, Jamaica's problems erupt with Russell. She's angry because he doesn't have any markers and she has to share hers. Sitting beside Russell, she criticizes his scribbled drawing, and in response, he turns his blue marker on her fall tree picture. By the story's end, Jamaica's insights erase the uglier feelings she had and she becomes wiser about trying to understand the feelings of others.
School Library Journal
PreS-Gr 2-Jamaica is not thrilled about having to share her blue marker with Russell. He never has the supplies he needs, and this time he takes the marker and draws all over her picture. The next day, she discovers that he is moving. With the help of her father, she begins to understand that her classmate is mean because he is unhappy about leaving and gives him her blue marker to remember her by. Havill once again captures important events in the lives of young children through the kind and thoughtful Jamaica. Through an everyday occurrence, she learns a strong lesson about feelings-her own as well as others'. O'Brien's full-page watercolor illustrations feature a multiethnic classroom and beautifully reflect the expressions and moods of the main characters.-Helen Rosenberg, Chicago Public Library, IL
Hazel Rochman
In the latest picture book about Jamaica and her friends, Jamaica thinks her classmate Russell is a mean brat, especially when he scribbles all over her special drawing; but when she learns that he's moving away, she imagines how sad he must be and reaches out to him. The sensitive story and realistic watercolor pictures show Jamaica's strong feelings and how they change. We see her at home with her warm African American family and in her classroom with her teacher and the other kids. Then in a climactic double-page spread, Jamaica and Russell look at each other and talk and say good-bye. Use this with John Steptoe's classic "Stevie" (1969) and with other books about how enemies can become friends.
From the Publisher

"Havill here gives children insight into the phenomenon of acting out, where a child's distress about one aspect of life comes out in an unexpected way; Jamaica behaves realistically throughout, expressing her anger, but finding a way to reconcile with Russell before he leaves." --The Bulletin Bulletin of the Center for Children's Books

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Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780547562452
Publisher:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Publication date:
09/25/1995
Sold by:
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Format:
NOOK Book
Lexile:
420L (what's this?)
File size:
19 MB
Note:
This product may take a few minutes to download.
Age Range:
5 - 8 Years

Meet the Author



Juanita Havill is the author of many picture books including six other stories about Jamaica. She and her husband have two grown children and currently reside in Arizona.


Anne Sibley O'Brien has illustrated more than twenty books for children, including the Jamaica stories. She has two grown children and lives with her husband and cat in Maine.

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Jamaica's Blue Marker 4.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Here?
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
A wonderful example of how someones opinion about a person can change was they realize why that person acts the way they do. Jamaica's Blue Marker is a great teaching tool for showing an example of character change. Juanita Havill's Jamaica series books consistently have an author's message that is understandable to a young reader.
reneeny More than 1 year ago
I brought this book for my 5 year old daughter and she really enjoyed this book. We both could relate to the situation of both characters so well. Just perfect all around! I plan to buy another book from this author.