James Jones

Overview

James Jones always wrote from the perspective of the foot soldier. His war novels, From Here to Eternity and The Thin Red Line, follow the combat soldier who suffers first under the rigid class structure of the pre-war military and then under his superiors as he faced a brutal enemy on the island of Guadalcanal. Jones wrote Whistle, a story of wounded survivors, who returned home with the understanding that there was hope as they tried to recover from their personal traumas. However, none were able to overcome ...
See more details below
This Paperback is Not Available through BN.com
Sending request ...

More About This Book

Overview

James Jones always wrote from the perspective of the foot soldier. His war novels, From Here to Eternity and The Thin Red Line, follow the combat soldier who suffers first under the rigid class structure of the pre-war military and then under his superiors as he faced a brutal enemy on the island of Guadalcanal. Jones wrote Whistle, a story of wounded survivors, who returned home with the understanding that there was hope as they tried to recover from their personal traumas. However, none were able to overcome post-combat stress and understand the strange America they discovered. Finally, Jones' pessimism is revealed throughout Some Came Running, a story about a veteran who returns at the end of the war and tries to adjust to life in his home town with the support of his family and friends. In all cases, Jones' veterans suffer death; none survive the psychological traumas created by combat. Since the Vietnam War, many studies have been conducted on Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder and the afflicted soldier's attempt to return to normal life. But, after World War II, everyone assumed the veteran immediately assimilated back into the life he knew before the war. Jones' novels show us a previously hidden side to these veterans' lives. Because he believed that war was a permanent fixture of a soldier's life, Jones develops a theory he calls "The Evolution of a Soldier" in his 1975 novel WWII, in which he details how a man becomes a true combat soldier by reaching the final stage of killing the enemy while accepting the possibility of his own certain death. This dissertation will show how his theory unfolds in novels written before 1975 by paying close attention to the psychological stress faced by these soldiers. His novels uncover problems which military psychologists failed to identify accurately. In addition, I will show how Jones suffered from post-traumatic stress aggravated by alcoholism but eased through his writing. Finally, I will show how accepting Jones' canon as a tribute to the common combat soldier and the psychological troubles he faced before, during and after combat demands reconsideration of all war novels as not just action stories but statements against war.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781243704214
  • Publisher: BiblioLabsII
  • Publication date: 9/8/2011
  • Pages: 164
  • Product dimensions: 7.44 (w) x 9.69 (h) x 0.35 (d)

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)