James Joyce: A Life

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Overview

"Joyce fans should thank their lucky stars." -The New York Times

Arguably the most influential writer of the twentieth century, James Joyce continues to inspire writers, readers, and thinkers today. Now Edna O'Brien, herself one of Ireland's great writers, approaches the master as only a fellow countryman can. From Joyce's adolescence through his travels abroad to the publication of Ulysses-the scandalous masterpiece that was initially banned in the U nited States but later ...

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Overview

"Joyce fans should thank their lucky stars." -The New York Times

Arguably the most influential writer of the twentieth century, James Joyce continues to inspire writers, readers, and thinkers today. Now Edna O'Brien, herself one of Ireland's great writers, approaches the master as only a fellow countryman can. From Joyce's adolescence through his travels abroad to the publication of Ulysses-the scandalous masterpiece that was initially banned in the U nited States but later hailed as one of the most brilliant novels of the twentieth century-O'Brien traces the arc of Joyce's remarkable life. Her biography is a tribute, at once affectionate and stern, from a contemporary writer to one of our most significant literary ancestors.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780143119937
  • Publisher: Penguin Group (USA) Incorporated
  • Publication date: 11/29/2011
  • Pages: 192
  • Sales rank: 973,095
  • Product dimensions: 4.90 (w) x 7.00 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author

Edna O'Brien is the author of numerous books, including The Country Girls Trilogy, The Light of the Evening, Byron in Love, and House of Splendid Isolation. She is the recipient of the James Joyce Ulysses Medal. She lives in London, England.

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Customer Reviews

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Sort by: Showing all of 3 Customer Reviews
  • Posted December 29, 2011

    more from this reviewer

    Very Interesting

    James Joyce was an author who could easily have been classified as mad or brilliant or perhaps both. Edna O'Brien gives us a glimpse into James Joyce's unconventional life in her novel, James Joyce: A Life. I wanted to read this book because James Joyce is on my list of authors whose books I need to read. I've had Dubliners sitting on my shelf unread for the longest time. However I have managed to read a few of his works so I didn't feel totally unprepared.
    Edna O'Brien touches on various points in Joyce's life from birth to death. From Joyce's dysfunctional family life to his volatile marriage to his wife, Nora. O'Brien includes many interesting facts about Joyce's rise to fame. His peculiar tendencies and his prideful nature.
    I think if I had read more of Joyce's novels before hand it would have helped me to decipher and make the character connections even more so. O'Brien did a fairly good job in trying to correlate the influences in Joyce's life to the characters in his novels. This is also a short biography so it doesn't go into great detail about Joyce's life. However this is a great introduction to James Joyce.
    Overall this is a good read. It's an insightful look into one of literature's treasures. This biography is really enjoyable and I'm so glad that I read it. Now it's time to dust Dubliners off the shelf.

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  • Posted October 30, 2011

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    A Writer Larger Than His World!

    Emotionally bereft, haunted by poverty, cynical of religion and politics, James Joyce spends his whole life determined to grasp every experience to its dregs. Edna O'Brien masterfully conveys how these attitudes and consequent behaviors both attracted and repulsed professional and consumer readers throughout Joyce's stressful, conflict-ridden life. In the beginning of his life, he moves from being an ardent Catholic to one who projects his hatred of his own lusts upon the priests who formerly inspired him. A fluctuating love-hate relationship exists between him and the predominant political leaders of his time as well. Yet O'Brien doesn't allow the reader to forget that he passionately loved the land he was to reject for most of his tortured life, condemning them as he wrote, "Poets were the keepers of spirituality and priests the destroyers and usurpers."

    Ibsen is Joyce's first love, sharing with him a hatred of hypocrisy and falsity. Joyce read voraciously throughout his whole life, and it is that knowledge as well as every facet of his own world that will fill the pages of Ulysses, the work he is most famous for crafting. Support and rejection fluctuate from Joyce's family, including his closest brother Stanislaus. O'Brien calls the relationship with Joyce's mother, as with all brilliant writers, "the uncharted deep." For Joyce it was an association of the Host of Catholicism, the prostitutes and his mother's tenderness," hardly associations yielding a good connection to family, romance, and religion. He will wed Nora Barnacle and their marriage will be full of attraction and repulsion as life becomes more ordinary when the writer can revel only in the extraordinary, unique, and almost frenetic moments that give purpose to his understanding and writing.

    Memory and exile are the elements fueling the pages of his novels and stories, to which one must add knowledge. O'Brien takes us through each work Joyce constructed, the reactions of individuals and Ireland and the difficulties in publishing Joyce knew, chiefly because of what was perceived to be criticism highlighted with the most obscene language and images. Sexual passion continues to fuel his life with Nora, a woman who pleased him in this one way but could never even come close to understanding his mind. His family life is even more stressed later on with the mental instability of his daughter, Lucia, a woman who finally is committed yet who remarkably resembles her father in so many of her ramblings and associations.

    While many know the highlights of James Joyce's life, Edna O'Brien presents her knowledge and analysis with aplomb, implying with depth the undercurrents of Joyce's mind and soul, while stating the obvious; interpreting and making connections that the average reader might miss while again implying that so few truly understood what drove Joyce's scurrilous and debasing depiction of life's grand and sordid aspects. Brief but potent,O'Brien's biography of James Joyce is a phenomenal read about an unfathomable writer - both are brilliant, indeed!!!

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 9, 2003

    Good, but not as good as expected

    Edna O'Brien is a truly outstanding writer, and she has a great subject which she certainly has a great deal of enthusiasm for. I thought therefore that this book would be terrific. It was good, but it fell short, and in the end did not give me personally any great insight into Joyce the man, or Joyce's work. I years ago read what I believe is still the best biography, Richard Ellmann's and so know much of the story. I also know Joyce's work fairly well. O'Brien lets down here the most . I did however learn a couple of important things about Joyce's life I had not known.One is how much his connection with his father meant to him, even in the years of exile. The second is the high intensity of his sexual relationship with Nora. The book says very little about Joyce's relation to his son, Georgio. It does tell the story of Joyce's painfully sad relationship with the daughter Lucia. O'Brien again is an excellent writer with a great feel for the language. But here too I was disappointed as she did not cite so many of the truly great Joyce passages, and instead selected those ( even in Finnegan's Wake ) which it seems to me are of lesser importance.And this as if to indicate that one of the anticipated pleasures of reading a biography of a writer whose work one knows is the opportunity to meet again familiar passages, and take pleasure in them. Where in this book is ' forge in the smitty of my soul the uncreated conscience of my race' or ' epiphanies on green oval leaves ' or that most moving ending of ' carry me along taddy like you done at the toy fair 'and the great close of ' a way a lone a last a long the ' The great poetic beauty of the Joycean flow , and its riversong is however brought out in her reading of Anna Livia Plurabelle. Nothing of substance is said about 'Dubliners' or ' Portrait of the Artist' and she does not tell his story as it might be told in terms of the career in creation of his works.

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