Jamestown Experiment: The Remarkable Story of the Enterprising Colony and the Unexpected Results That Shaped America [NOOK Book]

Overview

The American dream was built along the banks of the James River in Virginia.

The settlers who established America's first permanent English colony at Jamestown were not seeking religious or personal freedom. They were comprised of gentlemen adventurers and common tradesmen who risked their lives and fortunes on the venture and stood to reap the rewards-the rewards of personal profit and the glory of mother England. If they could live long ...

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Jamestown Experiment: The Remarkable Story of the Enterprising Colony and the Unexpected Results That Shaped America

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Overview

The American dream was built along the banks of the James River in Virginia.

The settlers who established America's first permanent English colony at Jamestown were not seeking religious or personal freedom. They were comprised of gentlemen adventurers and common tradesmen who risked their lives and fortunes on the venture and stood to reap the rewards-the rewards of personal profit and the glory of mother England. If they could live long enough to see their dream come to life.

The Jamestown Experiment is the dramatic, engaging, and tumultuous story of one of the most audacious business efforts in Western history. It is the story of well-known figures like John Smith setting out to create a source of wealth not bestowed by heritage. As they struggled to make this dream come true, they would face relentless calamities, including mutinies, shipwrecks, native attacks, and even cannibalism. And at every step of the way, the decisions they made to keep this business alive would not only affect their effort, but would shape the future of the land on which they had settled in ways they never could have expected.

The Jamestown Experiment is the untold story of the unlikely and dramatic events that defined the "self-made man" and gave birth to the American dream.

Tony Williams taught history and literature for ten years, and has a master's in American history from Ohio State University. He wrote Hurricane of Independence and The Pox and the Covenant, and is currently a full-time author who lives in Williamsburg, Virginia, with his wife and children.

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Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
Williams fills his absorbing new effort (The Pox and the Covenant) with outrageously colorful characters, including arrogant politicos, mutinous citizens, treacherous Indians, their equally cruel white counterparts, and "gentleman adventurers" aplenty. After the journey of "107 brave souls…across 3,000 miles of ocean into a virtually unknown land...the tottering colony faced very grim prospects in the race against death." Atrocities were rampant: emissaries to the Indians were "killed and their mouths ‘stopped full of bread' as a sign of what would happen to any Englishmen who sought food from the Indians," and after one battle an English leader ordered a soldier beheaded for sparing Indians, including children. "They decided to toss the children overboard and shoot them." Williams chronicles dreadful voyages, shipwrecks (including one that stranded a group in Bermuda for a year), unremitting privation, interminable skirmishes among Indians and settlers, a flamboyant public relations ploy to attract more English investment, and more. Miraculously, settlers survived this disastrous period (1607 to 1619), evolving to enjoy a thriving tobacco trade. "The American dream was built along the banks of the James River," says Williams, but before the dream came the nightmare. (Feb.)
Book News
Author, educator, and lecturer Williams writes that while the first permanent English colony at Jamestown seemed doomed to fail for a variety of well-known reasons, the colonists finally found the solutions to put the colony on track for success. The book tells the story of the events and people responsible for the Jamestown turnaround and why, over time, it has had such a strong influence on the shaping of a distinct American character.
Internet Review of Books
The Jamestown Experiment is written more like a novel than many historical works I've read, so it was a fast read for me. There are many memorable characters in the book, including John Smith, whom the author brought vividly to life.
Midwest Book Review
The Jamestown Experiment is a fine read of history and early European American encounters.
Virginia Gazette
The first question most readers may ask is 'Do we need another book on the history of Jamestown and early Virginia?' Read on, or better yet, read the book to find out what the organizers and early settlers brought to the shore that helped make the United States what it is today.
Kirkus Reviews

A serviceable account of the entrepreneurial experiment that was England's first permanent North American colony.

Williams (The Pox and the Covenant: Mather, Franklin, and the Epidemic that Changed America's Destiny, 2010, etc.) sets a useful context for his study by addressing the processes and patterns of European colonization in the New World. As he notes, the Spanish, who were far ahead of the English, gave their overseas enterprises state backing, while the British crown preferred to privatize the ventures but still take a cut of the proceeds. So it was with the Jamestown Colony, whose backers "were daring and adventurous and willing to risk their lives in search of their personal fortunes and glory." Very true, and few figures in the history of the time are quite so daring and swashbuckling as John Smith, who, Williams reminds us, had quite a career dashing about the Mediterranean, fighting Turks and seizing booty before heading off to the swamps of Virginia. His wealth-seeking fellow colonists had Smith's knack for selling the place. Though they came in search of gold, they were content with sassafras roots, which they shipped back to the motherland by the ton, as well as other "valuable minerals and commodities that could be exploited for a return to the investors in England." Ultimately, Jamestown went bust, but the colony inspired thousands of Britons to leave their home and journey to Virginia and the New World. Williams tells the tale competently enough, but he does not adequately address the complex back story of the colony and its relations with the native peoples of the Chesapeake Bay, which hinge on matters anthropological, economic and geopolitical. For that, we have other recent, superior books such as David A. Price'sLove and Hate in Jamestown(2003) and Camilla Townsend'sPocahontas and the Powhatan Dilemma (2004), which fill in the considerable blanks here.

Literate and occasionally engaging, but those earlier books should be the reader's first choices.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781402245664
  • Publisher: Sourcebooks, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 2/1/2011
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Pages: 320
  • Sales rank: 179,837
  • File size: 689 KB

Read an Excerpt

From Chapter One
Gentlemen Adventurers and the Call to Empire

Long before Jamestown was settled, adventurous Englishmen were among the first Europeans to brave the dangers of crossing the Atlantic to stake a claim to the riches of distant lands. On May 20, 1497, the small ship Matthew embarked from Bristol on the west coast of England. The port city had a thriving trade with the Atlantic and Mediterranean in Icelandic codfish, Spanish wine, and local woolens. The captain had letters of patent from King Henry VII for a voyage to discover new lands "unknown to all Christians," though no financial backing from the Crown. The king would receive one fifth of any riches that were discovered, but the captain had to fund the voyage himself. The captain was seeking a northern route across the Atlantic to Cathay (China) and the riches of the spice trade in the Indies. The man who captained the vessel was not even English; he was an Italian with the anglicized name John Cabot.

On June 24, the Matthew landed on the Feast of St. John in northern Newfoundland. He coasted for hundreds of miles along its eastern shore through dense fogbanks and floating icebergs. His sailors went ashore once and saw signs of life but no natives.

The men easily scooped up basketfuls of cod from the rich fishing grounds. Having made his discoveries, Cabot ordered his crew to set sail for England. The Matthew made landfall in Brittany in early August and returned to Bristol a few days later.

Cabot traveled to London, and four days later had an audience with the king at Westminster. The explorer did not have a baggage train of spices and gold to show the king, but he had valuable information of a great discovery-Cabot assumed that he had indeed discovered a northwest passage to Cathay and made landfall on an island off the Eurasian continent.

King Henry's imagination was stirred by news of this "new found land," and he offered Cabot a reward of £10 for his discovery. Henry also granted Cabot new letters of patent for a second voyage to establish a colony that would send shiploads of spices to London. This time the king provided and laded a ship, while British merchants invested in four ships filled with cloth to trade for spices. In May 1498, the five ships left Bristol with hopes of bringing home great riches. One of the ships returned shortly, but the other four, including Cabot's, were never heard from again.(1)

This was largely the extent of English overseas ambitions for more than half a century. After this faltering attempt at discovery, the English relinquished the initiative for daring voyages of discovery and the riches of the Far East and the New World to the Spanish and Portuguese.

The English were laggards in the race for overseas empire compared to their Iberian rivals, who had trade relations and imperial possessions in their far-flung empire stretching across the world in the Caribbean, the Americas, the Philippines, the Indies, Japan, and China. As would be later said of other empires, the sun never set on the Spanish Empire in the first half of the sixteenth century. The Spanish Empire began when the admiral of the ocean sea, Christopher Columbus, sailed to the New World in 1492 and discovered gold on his first voyage, which prompted three more transatlantic crossings to the Caribbean and the South American mainland.(2)

Rival Portuguese and Spanish claims to the New World caused the intervention of Pope Alexander VI, who issued the papal bull Inter caetera (1493), which led to a claim dispute between the two imperial powers. The next year, the Spanish and Portuguese quickly negotiated the Treaty of Tordesillas, setting a line of demarcation at 370 leagues west of the Cape Verde Islands. Spain won the rights to the territory west of the line, and the Portuguese to the east.(3)

Over the next two decades, Spanish colonists exported an impressive fourteen tons of gold from the Caribbean to Seville. Still, some were dissatisfied with their personal gain and sought gold over agricultural pursuits, with Hernando Cortés famously quipping, "I came here to get rich, not to till the soil like a peasant." Settlers successively moved from Hispaniola to Puerto Rico, Jamaica, and Cuba in search of wealth. In 1519, Cortés led an expedition of settlers called conquistadors to the mainland and two years later conquered the Aztec Empire centered at Tenochtitlan in Mexico. In 1532, Francisco Pizzaro conquered the Incan Empire in Peru and seized tens of thousands of pounds of gold and silver.(4)

Bartolomé de Las Casas published an indictment of the Spanish cruelty toward the native peoples, wildly speculating that the colonists had killed twenty million. Although the natives did indeed perish by the millions and the Spanish settlers committed atrocities, the native populations were overwhelmingly wiped out more from smallpox, influenza, measles, and a plethora of other diseases than by the sword. Still, the rumor became fact in the mind of Spain's enemies, who used it for propaganda purposes to denounce Spanish imperialism.(5)

In September 1519, Ferdinand Magellan led the Armada de Molucca that set sail from Spain to the fabulous riches of the Spice Islands in the East Indies. He braved the tempestuous straits at the tip of South America and entered the vast Pacific Ocean. Although he was killed by natives in the Philippines, his men endured and reached their destination, trading for thousands of pounds of spices, including cinnamon, clove, and nutmeg. Scurvy and starvation claimed the lives of his men, while shipwrecks destroyed some of the vessels with their precious cargoes. Less than twenty of the sailors managed to circumnavigate the globe in one ship with a cargo that more than paid for the three-year voyage.(6)

The Mexican and Peruvian mines fed the Spanish treasure fleets that crossed the Atlantic to Seville every year laden with the precious metals. The wealth supported Spanish ambitions on the Continent, paying Spanish and mercenary armies in Italy and the Netherlands, when the Dutch revolted against Spanish rule. Initially, the fleets had to contend with deadly hurricanes and other dangers of the Atlantic, but then they proved too inviting a target for other Europeans. For the English, some cod fishing boats joined hundreds of vessels from other European nations traveling back and forth to Newfoundland every summer, but that was the extent of the English overseas ventures. But by the middle of the sixteenth century, all that was about to change.

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Table of Contents

Contents
Acknowledgments       ix
Introduction          xi
1. Gentlemen Adventurers and the Call to Empire  1
2. John Smith and the Idea of Virginia   25
3. Voyaging to Virginia       41
4. Settling Virginia       55
5. Death in Jamestown        69
6. Golden Dreams         87
7. The Rise of John Smith      103
8. For God, Glory, and Gold       123
9. A Fateful Day for the Sea Venture139
10. The Sinking of the Sea Venture151
11. The Fall of John Smith     161
12. The Isle of Devils      173
13. The Starving Time      191
14. Martial Law       203
15. War          215
16. An Enterprising Colony     233
17. A Royal Colony       245
Epilogue         255
Endnotes        259
Bibliography         279
Index          287
About the Author        33

Tony Williams taught history and literature for ten years, and has a master's in American History from Ohio State University. He is the author of Hurricane of Independence and The Pox and the Covenant, and is currently a fulltime author who lives in Williamsburg, VA, with his wife and children.

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 36 )
Rating Distribution

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See All Sort by: Showing 1 – 20 of 36 Customer Reviews
  • Anonymous

    Posted December 27, 2011

    Do not read this!!

    This book is a waste of time money and space

    14 out of 65 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted October 29, 2012

    Biased and poorly written

    The author sets out to prove a common thesis; namely, that Jamestown only succeeded after the colony's leaders adopted free-market economics and rejected common-ownership of anything. Other causes--poor planning and management, the ill-suitability of the English rent-seeking society to a wilderness colony--are not explored. Like the founders of Jamestown, the author has his idea, and he's going to stick to it (listing Hayek as a source for a book on early American colonial history? Come on).

    The author never makes the story compelling. No one character gets special focus, so keeping the cast straight is a chore.

    5 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 29, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Good parts, but mostly boring

    I purchased this book to learn about Jamestown a few weeks before our planned vacation to Jamestown and Williamsburg. The book turned out to be a little less exciting than I expected, considering all of the disease, fights with the indians, and fights amongst the colonists. I also found some differences in the historical facts in the book and the ones I learned while on vacation; however some of the facts I learned from the tour guides seemed to be far-fetched, so I'm still not sure which to believe. It was a good starting point of research for me, but a little too boring to finish.

    5 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 31, 2012

    JAMESTOWN TERRORS by LLL

    Excellent little book for American history buffs and scholars, as well as for those who enjoy mystery, intrigue, and adventure.

    4 out of 7 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 26, 2012

    more from this reviewer

    Well written and researched

    Well written with sources amply cited. A bit slow at the beginning and could have used more contest at the end.

    4 out of 6 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 26, 2012

    Solid volume on Jamestown

    The style of this book is fairly easy to read. I learned a few facts about the first successful English colony in North America. However, most of the perspective of the boon is from the various leaders of the colony without exploring any of the motivations of the rank and file. This is a solid book if you are looking for some background on Jamestown.

    3 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 27, 2012

    boring

    I love history, but this was frankly very boring......

    2 out of 5 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 29, 2012

    Ivery good Very good. Good refresher oo Of american history. Very good. Good refresher course in american history.

    Enjoyed the writing style

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 26, 2012

    A very surprising read!

    I had no idea of the struggles at Jamestown. As a former elementary teacher realizing how little I knew about American History, I chose The
    Jamestown Experiment to read first. Everyone should read about the struggles these people faced. I have a new found pride in our country!

    1 out of 2 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 26, 2012

    Fantastic Read!

    I am loving the story of Jamestown. It is being transported back to a new and raw frontier. I had no idea John Smith escaped death so narrowly so many times in Europe and in the Americas.

    Its an adventure and I am loving it!

    1 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 9, 2012

    A long slog

    Found this book disappointing; fairly tedious for the first half. Picked up a bit toward the end but I had to push myself to finish it. Although it's stuffed full of citations, I felt it failed to prove its central thesis until the very end.

    1 out of 3 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted November 2, 2013

    Loved this book. The author brought history to life and makes y

    Loved this book. The author brought history to life and makes you feel as if you are actually there.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted April 17, 2013

    GOOD READ

    I bought this book because I discovered I had an ancestor born in Henrico in 1617. I thought this was remarkable but Ihad no idea how remarkable it was. Maybe it is a little dry but it is fascinating and compelling at the same time. I have two college degrees, one in English Literature, so I didn't consider myself to be uneducated in American history. This book was a revelation. I have much to learn. This book taught me a lot! I recommend it highly.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted May 9, 2012

    Great

    Good info, easy read!!!

    0 out of 1 people found this review helpful.

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  • Posted January 26, 2012

    Not yet read.

    Have not read this book yet and since rating was required I only gave it one. Would be glad to re-rate after reading.

    0 out of 12 people found this review helpful.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 29, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted January 26, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 27, 2011

    No text was provided for this review.

  • Anonymous

    Posted December 27, 2011

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 16, 2012

    No text was provided for this review.

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