Jamie O'Rourke and the Pooka

Jamie O'Rourke and the Pooka

4.7 4
by Tomie dePaola
     
 

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When Jamie O'Rourke's wife leaves him alone for a week, it's up to Jamie to do the housework. But Jamie isn't just the laziest man in Ireland, he's also the messiest! When a magical pooka arrives unexpectedly and starts to do the dishes and sweep the house, Jamie thinks that maybe he's the luckiest man in Ireland as well. But will Jamie's good fortune-and his pooka's

Overview

When Jamie O'Rourke's wife leaves him alone for a week, it's up to Jamie to do the housework. But Jamie isn't just the laziest man in Ireland, he's also the messiest! When a magical pooka arrives unexpectedly and starts to do the dishes and sweep the house, Jamie thinks that maybe he's the luckiest man in Ireland as well. But will Jamie's good fortune-and his pooka's housekeeping-last? Young readers will be giggling through Tomie dePaola's delightfully funny sequel to Jamie O'Rourke and the Big Potato.

"DePaola's jaunty storytelling pace and his snappy Irish phrases give this tale extra sparkle." Publishers Weekly, starred review

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly
In a starred review, PW wrote, "Lazy but lovable Jamie O'Rourke returns in this dandy and original Irish folktale." Ages 4-6. (Jan.) Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information.
Children's Literature
Jamie, the laziest man in all of Ireland, is nevertheless intent about keeping the cottage clean until his wife returns home from visiting her sister. When his three cronies learn that Jamie is alone, they go to keep him company. What a time they have! And what a mess they make. Overwhelmed by the thought of cleaning, Jamie heads to bed only to be awakened by a donkey that cleans the entire house. Jamie has a good deal going with this pooka, or animal spirit, until it outwits him. DePaola's character of Jamie O'Rourke returns in this story patterned on an old Irish tale. His familiar illustration style takes on a cartoon look for this charming and whimsical story. There is a lilt to the prose that makes this a fun read- aloud. DePaola gets us to feel a bit of pity for the rascally Jamie, the laziest man in all of Ireland. 2000, G.P. Putnam's Sons, Ages 4 to 8, $16.99. Reviewer: Sharon Salluzzo
School Library Journal
K-Gr 4-Still no more energetic than in Jamie O'Rourke and the Big Potato (Putnam, 1992), the laziest man in Ireland has the perfect plan for keeping his cottage tidy while his wife is away-he'll simply stay in bed and get up only to eat. When his pals arrive with a jug of cider and hearty appetites, Jamie finds himself with a messy cottage and the exhausting prospect of cleaning up. During the night, a pooka comes and clears away all evidence of the evening's party. The donkeylike creature returns each night to tidy up. Curious, Jamie asks why he is being so kind. He explains that he is being punished for laziness in a past life. Jamie is moved to perform a kind deed in return, which he immediately regrets-the pooka is now free and the indolent man is left alone just in time for Eileen to return to the mess. In some scenes, dePaola's liquid acrylic paintings spill over their frames onto the white space surrounding them. Particularly frenzied activity, like the pooka's midnight house cleaning, is depicted in multiple frames that resemble a comic strip. The pooka, with his wild yellow eyes and toothy grimace, looks sinister enough to satisfy young readers who enjoy a scare, while Jamie's cat's and dog's facial expressions reflect their owner's changing moods. A concluding author's note explaining the story's origins in Irish folklore is a satisfying addition to an enjoyable original tale.-Ginny Gustin, Santa Monica Public Library, CA Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.|
Midwest Book Review
Jamie's wife leaves him for a week and all he has to do is keep the house clean: not a small challenge for the messiest man in Ireland -- and the laziest. A magical pooka may be able to help -- or perhaps not, in this fun story.
Bonnie Fowler
Use this laughable read-aloud, with its moment-by-moment illustrations and its message against laziness, as a fine introduction to the pookas of literature.
Bookbag Magazine

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781101653487
Publisher:
Penguin Young Readers Group
Publication date:
01/14/2002
Sold by:
Penguin Group
Format:
NOOK Book
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
600,800
Lexile:
AD570L (what's this?)
File size:
17 MB
Note:
This product may take a few minutes to download.
Age Range:
4 - 8 Years

Meet the Author

Tomie dePaola was born in Meriden, Connecticut, in 1934 to a
family of Irish and Italian background. By the time he could hold a pencil, he knew what his life's work would be. His determination to create books for children led to a BFA from Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, New York, and an MFA from the California College of
Arts&Crafts in Oakland, California.



It drove him through the years of teaching, designing greeting cards and stage sets, and painting church murals until 1965, when he illustrated his first children's book, Sound, by Lisa Miller for Coward-McCann. Eventually, freed of other obligations, he plunged full time into both writing and illustrating children's books.



He names Fra Angelico and Giotto, Georges Rouault, and Ben Shahn as major
influences on his work, but he soon found his own unique style. His particular way with color, line, detail, and design have earned him many of the most prestigious awards in his
field, among them a Caldecott Honor Award for Strega Nona, the Smithsonian Medal from the Smithsonian Institution, the Kerlan Award from the University of Minnesota for his "singular attainment in children's literature," the Catholic Library
Association's Regina Medal for his "continued distinguished contribution," and the University of Southern Mississippi Medallion. He was also the 1990 United States nominee for the Hans Christian Andersen Medal for illustration.



Tomie dePaola has published almost 200 children's books in fifteen different
countries. He remains one of the most popular creators of books for children, receiving more than 100,000 fan letters each year.



Tomie lives in an interesting house in New Hampshire with his four dogs. His studio is in a large renovated 200-year-old barn.



- He has been published for over 30 years.

- Over 5 million copies of his books have sold worldwide.

- His books have been published in over 15 different countries.

- He receives nearly 100,000 fan letters each year.



Tomie dePaola has received virtually every significant recognition for
his books in the children's book world, including:


- Caldecott Honor Award from American Library Association

- Newbery Honor Award from American Library Association

- Smithson Medal from Smithsonian Institution

- USA nominee in illustration for Hans Christian Andersen Medal

- Regina Medal from Catholic Library Association



copyright © 2000 by Penguin Putnam Books for Young Readers. All rights reserved.

Tomie dePaola was born in Meriden, Connecticut, in 1934 to a
family of Irish and Italian background. By the time he could hold a pencil, he knew what his life's work would be. His determination to create books for children led to a BFA from Pratt Institute in Brooklyn, New York, and an MFA from the California College of
Arts&Crafts in Oakland, California.



It drove him through the years of teaching, designing greeting cards and stage sets, and painting church murals until 1965, when he illustrated his first children's book, Sound, by Lisa Miller for Coward-McCann. Eventually, freed of other obligations, he plunged full time into both writing and illustrating children's books.



He names Fra Angelico and Giotto, Georges Rouault, and Ben Shahn as major
influences on his work, but he soon found his own unique style. His particular way with color, line, detail, and design have earned him many of the most prestigious awards in his
field, among them a Caldecott Honor Award for Strega Nona, the Smithsonian Medal from the Smithsonian Institution, the Kerlan Award from the University of Minnesota for his "singular attainment in children's literature," the Catholic Library
Association's Regina Medal for his "continued distinguished contribution," and the University of Southern Mississippi Medallion. He was also the 1990 United States nominee for the Hans Christian Andersen Medal for illustration.



Tomie dePaola has published almost 200 children's books in fifteen different
countries. He remains one of the most popular creators of books for children, receiving more than 100,000 fan letters each year.



Tomie lives in an interesting house in New Hampshire with his four dogs. His studio is in a large renovated 200-year-old barn.



- He has been published for over 30 years.

- Over 5 million copies of his books have sold worldwide.

- His books have been published in over 15 different countries.

- He receives nearly 100,000 fan letters each year.



Tomie dePaola has received virtually every significant recognition for
his books in the children's book world, including:


- Caldecott Honor Award from American Library Association

- Newbery Honor Award from American Library Association

- Smithson Medal from Smithsonian Institution

- USA nominee in illustration for Hans Christian Andersen Medal

- Regina Medal from Catholic Library Association



copyright © 2000 by Penguin Putnam Books for Young Readers. All rights reserved.

Brief Biography

Hometown:
Connecticut and New Hampshire
Date of Birth:
September 15, 1935
Place of Birth:
Meriden, CT
Website:
http://www.tomie.com/main.html

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Jamie O'Rourke and the Pooka 4.8 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Fun story, my daughter likes to reread it and enjoys laughing at the word and thought of a Pooka!
NEC More than 1 year ago
Jamie O'Rourke and the Pooka kept my son's attention through out the story. It is a cute story that excersises the imagination. After the first read through my son liked it so much he read it to me several times more and he's gone back to the book several times since. He and I both enjoyed the characters very much. He wasn't sure what a Pooka was and we had both seen Harvey with Jimmy Stewart so he understood what a Pooka was with that refrence.
Nanvar More than 1 year ago
Our 4 and 6 year old grandsons have really enjoyed this book. They understand being messy and the consequences.
LoveHistoryVA More than 1 year ago
Jamie O'Rourke is one of those hilarious characters of Irish legend and TOmie de Paola's terrific illustrations make this a classic.