BN.com Gift Guide

Jane Boleyn: The True Story of the Infamous Lady Rochford (DO NOT ORDER - Canadian Edition)

Overview

A fascinating debut biography of Jane Boleyn, the lady-in-waiting who witnessed and survived Henry VIII’s perilous reign, until she too became a victim.

In a life of extraordinary drama, Jane Boleyn was catapulted from the obscurity of the English countryside to the forefront of Henry VIII’s spectacular court, as lady-in-waiting to not just one, but five of Henry’s wives. Always at the centre of court life and intrigue, Jane attended the parties, the masque balls, and the ...

See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (3) from $3.95   
  • Used (3) from $3.95   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$3.95
Seller since 2009

Feedback rating:

(23964)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

Good
Our feedback rating says it all: Five star service and fast delivery! We have shipped four million items to happy customers, and have one MILLION unique items ready to ship today!

Ships from: Toledo, OH

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$3.95
Seller since 2009

Feedback rating:

(25693)

Condition: Good
Giving great service since 2004: Buy from the Best! 4,000,000 items shipped to delighted customers. We have 1,000,000 unique items ready to ship! Find your Great Buy today!

Ships from: Toledo, OH

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
$6.98
Seller since 2009

Feedback rating:

(174)

Condition: Like New
2009 Paperback Fine Clean, tight, unmarked, -JP All orders are shipped by kbooks every business day.

Ships from: Niagara Falls, NY

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

A fascinating debut biography of Jane Boleyn, the lady-in-waiting who witnessed and survived Henry VIII’s perilous reign, until she too became a victim.

In a life of extraordinary drama, Jane Boleyn was catapulted from the obscurity of the English countryside to the forefront of Henry VIII’s spectacular court, as lady-in-waiting to not just one, but five of Henry’s wives. Always at the centre of court life and intrigue, Jane attended the parties, the masque balls, and the jousts, and participated in the royal births, the weddings, the funerals, and the personal drama that swirled around the king, his wives, and their courtiers. As Henry’s wives rose and then fell, taking so many down with them, Jane stayed on. Her story gives readers an amazing, ongoing view of the personal toll that Henry’s long and ruthlessly violent reign took on the people closest to him, and positions her as a survivor — that is, until she herself became the subject of the king’s rage.

History has not always been kind to the “Infamous Lady Rochford,” but in this fascinating biography, Julia Fox goes back to the original documents to rehabilitate Jane as a modern woman forced by brutal circumstances to fend for herself in a privileged but vicious world.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal

Historian Fox does an admirable job relating the life of Jane Boleyn (née Parker), sister-in-law to Anne Boleyn. Jane was expected to lead the usual life of a noble, but she too ended up a participant in extraordinary historical events. She began her time in Henry VIII's court as a lady-in-waiting to his first wife, Katherine of Aragon, and ultimately would be lady-in-waiting to five of Henry's wives. Fox's detailed descriptions of the extravagance, arrogance, and dangerous political maneuvers of the Tudor court help readers understand how Jane's "addiction" to court life began and led to her downfall. Her infamous reputation as the woman whose accusations aided the executions of her husband, George Boleyn, and his sister Anne is undeserved and was fabricated during the reign of Elizabeth I, according to Fox. But Fox confirms Jane's culpability in aiding Catherine Howard in her extramarital affair, which led to the execution of both women. Family trees of the Parkers, the Boleyns, and the Howards are included along with notes and a bibliography. This would make an exceptional reading group selection. Recommended for academic and public libraries. (Index not seen.) [The finished book will refer readers to a conversation with the author, posted online.-Ed.]
—Tonya Briggs

Kirkus Reviews
Debut author Fox sheds new light on the lesser-known life of Anne Boleyn's sister-in-law. The author vividly captures a pivotal moment in English history in an engrossing text that dances with devilry, opulence and deception as Tudor court intrigue swirls around Henry VIII and his various queens. After Henry dispensed with Catherine of Aragon so that he could marry Anne, Jane was privy to dazzling displays of pageantry, and she witnessed the entrance of a new queen, a new religion and ultimately the Reformation. This account of her life as an intimate of the doomed Anne offers an intensely personal look inside the day-to-day rhythms of court life. Fox is especially deft at conveying the walking-on-eggshells sensation experienced by all Henry's women, who knew only too well that they were expendable. Although Jane is something of a bit-player in the book's first half, after both Anne and her brother George (Jane's husband) are put to death, her own story and personality come into sharper focus. Living to serve as lady-in-waiting to two more of Henry's wives, Jane's own path to the executioner's block was paved by Catherine Howard, the king's ill-fated fifth wife. A sparkling chronicle, fine-tuned to the personal stories that lend texture and emotion to a biography. Agent: Christy Fletcher/Fletcher & Parry
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780771047770
  • Publisher: McClelland & Stewart Ltd.
  • Publication date: 3/24/2009
  • Pages: 416
  • Product dimensions: 5.10 (w) x 8.00 (h) x 0.90 (d)

Meet the Author

Julia Fox has a degree in history from the University of London, where she has taught for a number of years, specializing in the Tudors and in the nineteenth century. She is married to the historian John Guy and lives in the U.K. Jane Boleyn is her first book.

Read More Show Less

Read an Excerpt

From the moment she walked into Henry’s court, Jane entered another world. It was a world of complete opulence, a world in which everything that could make life more comfortable and more pleasurable was abundantly provided. The king demanded only the best. His palaces were richly furnished; his plate was silver, gilt or even gold. At night, the twinkling flames from hundreds of candles, firmly secured into the branches of gilt candelabra, glowed against the wooden paneling or brought alive the deep colors of the priceless tapestries which adorned so many walls. The evening suppers comprised course after course. Venison, veal, lamb, peacock, quail, heron, pigeon, turbot, salmon, bream — anything could appear, perhaps flavored with exotic spices like pepper, mace, nutmeg or saffron. By day, there could be hunting, jousting, tournaments; after supper, the haunting melodies of Henry’s musicians could fill the air or there could be dancing or even a masque or pageant to delight the eye. Amidst all of this, moved the rich, the famous, the glamorous, resplendent in bright, stylish garments glinting with precious stones. She did not see the king or queen every day, they would often retire to their private or privy apartments to be served only by the select few allowed admittance, and there were plenty of hours to be whiled away in quiet sewing, but for Jane, fresh from the calm tranquility of rural Essex, the sights and sounds of those first days were almost unbelievable.

She was barely given time to take it all in, perhaps even less than a year, before she was on the move. This was not unusual. The court was not fixed in one place. Its personnel followed Henry from palace to palace and he moved frequently so that each building could be thoroughly cleaned to reduce the threat of disease. In fact, he had such a dread of infection that he refused to be in any city where there was a hint of contagion. This move, though, was entirely different: it happened in June,1520, and was across the Channel to the English port of Calais. Cardinal Thomas Wolsey, Henry’s chief minister, had arranged for his master to meet the French king, Francis I, for a series of discussions which took place in near to the town of Guisnes, about five miles south from Calais. To please both monarchs, these talks were conducted in style and splendor, such style and splendor that the whole event came to be known as the Field of Cloth of Gold. And Jane traveled with her king.

She was, of course, not alone. Since they were bitter rivals, neither Henry nor Francis wanted to be upstaged by the other. Thus, they were accompanied by their queens, by the most important people of their kingdoms and by an army of servants and attendants. The names of many of those who embarked at Dover with the king are known. They range from the great dukes of Buckingham and Suffolk, to knights of the shires, to gentlemen such as Thomas More, down to hirelings like Thomas Wilson, a farrier. Then, amongst the list of those gentlewomen designated to attend upon Henry’s wife, Katherine of Aragon, we find the name of Mistress Parker, the form of address commonly used for Jane as the daughter of Sir Henry Parker, Lord Morley. In fact, almost six thousand men and women were assembled from each side. The sheer logistics of transporting them, let alone housing and feeding them, was a nightmare. Luckily for Henry, Wolsey, was the perfect man for the job. Indeed, Wolsey seemed capable of anything. He oversaw absolutely everything to do with the meeting, although even he was forced to delegate some of the arrangements. His principal assistant was Sir Richard Wingfield, the resident ambassador in France, whose sterling efforts in liaising with the French court ensured that both sides did exactly the same thing and arrived with exactly the same numbers in their entourage. For the French to flaunt their superior wealth would never do. As an experienced diplomat in his own right, Wingfield was astute enough to be punctilious in consulting Wolsey on every detail that cropped up, no matter how trivial. And it was Wolsey who had engineered the talks in the first place.

This was no mean feat. The English nobles were never happier than when fighting their traditional enemy; Henry shared their enthusiasm. Since he always believed himself the rightful King of France, and felt fully justified in using the title even though the only French land England possessed was the port of Calais and the area around it, persuading him to these talks required all of Wolsey’s ‘filed tongue and ornate eloquence’. Now that everyone had braved the Channel crossing, though, the fashionable humanist concept of peace and harmony captured their imaginations, especially since the celebrations themselves were so bewitching. Anyway, war was a cripplingly expensive pastime and no one wanted Wolsey to concentrate on the vexatious question of increased taxation. No, supporting their king in a face to face meeting designed to bring about peace in Europe, was acceptable, even exciting. There was bound to be a good joust or two to look forward to: they would provide a welcome excuse to parade English military prowess. And Henry was determined to put on a first-rate show. His England might be the smallest of the big three powers compared to the dominions of Francis and Katherine’s nephew, Charles V, King of Spain and Holy Roman Emperor, but it was civilized, cultured and sophisticated. He would prove it.

Read More Show Less

Foreword

1. When Julia Fox started this book she knew that she might challenge established views about Jane Boleyn. Did you come to the book with any preconceived views about Jane, and if so, what were they?

2. Although no one during Jane's lifetime suggested she gave the fatal evidence that condemned Anne and George Boleyn — and handwritten originals of sixteenth-century sources prove that she did not do so — the idea that she betrayed them has crept into popular culture and has persisted. One of Fox's aims was to question this mistaken idea by tracing this belief back through the centuries to its origin in Elizabeth's reign. Did you find the research Fox outlined in her Epiloguen convincing?

3. Fox's book is based on her study of Tudor documents in their original form. She says that some of her most thrilling moments while researching Jane Boleyn came from holding in her hand documents that had once been, almost five hundred years ago, in the hands of Henry VIII, Wolsey, the Boleyns, and Jane herself. What aspect of historical research do you think you would find the most thrilling?

4. One of Fox's finds was a previously forgotten document in an English country record office that lists the terms of Jane's marriage settlement. It reflects the trouble that she had prying a satisfactory income from her in-laws should her husband die. What light do you feel this sheds on Jane's conduct when George was arrested?

5. One problem facing Fox was that she could not prove that Jane was present at certain events, even if she felt sure of it in her own mind, because the names of only the most important figures there were recorded. This meant that the author used suchstratagems as "probably" or "most likely." Do you think that she was right to be such a stickler for accuracy or do you feel that she should have been more willing to commit herself?

6. Do you feel that Fox's explanation of how Jane Boleyn became involved in Catherine Howard's escapades rings true? Can you suggest any other explanation?

7. Did you have any sympathy for Anne Boleyn as she faced the executioner's sword that May morning in 1536, or with Catherine Howard as she picked her way across the icy cobbles of the Tower to meet a similar death a few years later? Did you feel that, within the context of their time, either deserved her fate?

8. What light do you think the book sheds on the role of women within the prevailing culture of Henry VIII's England?

9. When Henry VIII became king he was a handsome, generous, and talented youth. By the time he died, Fox believes, he had become a monster with little regard for the law or for human life. Do you feel that she has painted too dark a picture of Henry?

10. The Tudors are perennially popular subjects for films, TV series, and historical fiction. Do you think that this blurring of fact and fiction is good or bad for understanding history?

Read More Show Less

Reading Group Guide

1. When Julia Fox started this book she knew that she might challenge established views about Jane Boleyn. Did you come to the book with any preconceived views about Jane, and if so, what were they?

2. Although no one during Jane's lifetime suggested she gave the fatal evidence that condemned Anne and George Boleyn — and handwritten originals of sixteenth-century sources prove that she did not do so — the idea that she betrayed them has crept into popular culture and has persisted. One of Fox's aims was to question this mistaken idea by tracing this belief back through the centuries to its origin in Elizabeth's reign. Did you find the research Fox outlined in her Epiloguen convincing?

3. Fox's book is based on her study of Tudor documents in their original form. She says that some of her most thrilling moments while researching Jane Boleyn came from holding in her hand documents that had once been, almost five hundred years ago, in the hands of Henry VIII, Wolsey, the Boleyns, and Jane herself. What aspect of historical research do you think you would find the most thrilling?

4. One of Fox's finds was a previously forgotten document in an English country record office that lists the terms of Jane's marriage settlement. It reflects the trouble that she had prying a satisfactory income from her in-laws should her husband die. What light do you feel this sheds on Jane's conduct when George was arrested?

5. One problem facing Fox was that she could not prove that Jane was present at certain events, even if she felt sure of it in her own mind, because the names of only the most important figures there were recorded. This meant that the author used such stratagems as "probably" or "most likely." Do you think that she was right to be such a stickler for accuracy or do you feel that she should have been more willing to commit herself?

6. Do you feel that Fox's explanation of how Jane Boleyn became involved in Catherine Howard's escapades rings true? Can you suggest any other explanation?

7. Did you have any sympathy for Anne Boleyn as she faced the executioner's sword that May morning in 1536, or with Catherine Howard as she picked her way across the icy cobbles of the Tower to meet a similar death a few years later? Did you feel that, within the context of their time, either deserved her fate?

8. What light do you think the book sheds on the role of women within the prevailing culture of Henry VIII's England?

9. When Henry VIII became king he was a handsome, generous, and talented youth. By the time he died, Fox believes, he had become a monster with little regard for the law or for human life. Do you feel that she has painted too dark a picture of Henry?

10. The Tudors are perennially popular subjects for films, TV series, and historical fiction. Do you think that this blurring of fact and fiction is good or bad for understanding history?

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)