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Jane Goodall: 40 Years at Gombe: A Tribute to Four Decades of Wildlife Research, Education, and Conservation
     

Jane Goodall: 40 Years at Gombe: A Tribute to Four Decades of Wildlife Research, Education, and Conservation

by Jane Goodall Institute (Produced by), Goodall Inst, Gilbert M. Grosvenor (Foreword by), Jane Goodall, Jennifer Lindsey
 
On the occasion of Goodall's 40th anniversary of groundbreaking research with the chimpanzees of Gombe, this beautifully illustrated volume traces her work from its singular beginnings to the Jane Goodall Institute's present-day international activities. 65 full-color and 30 duotone photos.

Overview

On the occasion of Goodall's 40th anniversary of groundbreaking research with the chimpanzees of Gombe, this beautifully illustrated volume traces her work from its singular beginnings to the Jane Goodall Institute's present-day international activities. 65 full-color and 30 duotone photos.

Editorial Reviews

Library Journal - Library Journal
This reverent and beautifully photographed album celebrates the chimpanzees of Gombe and Jane Goodall's career as both a pioneering field biologist and a moral leader in the humane treatment and rehabilitation of laboratory animals. The brief biographical chapters repeat anecdotes from her recent autobiography Reason for Hope (LJ 9/15/99); later chapters provide more coverage of her work with organizations such as ChimpanZoo, chimpanzee sanctuaries, and Roots and Shoots, a youth environmental program. A recurring theme is Goodall's powerful motivation to bond personally with the chimpanzees she comes into contact with, be they orphans, lab animals, or even wild chimpanzees in her research study. Perhaps a more critical account of her career will explore the appropriateness of her approach in conducting scientific field studies. For now, her status as a patron saint of chimpanzees seems assured. Recommended for academic and public libraries.--Beth Clewis Crim, Prince William P.L., VA Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781556709470
Publisher:
Abrams, Harry N., Inc.
Publication date:
11/28/1999
Pages:
128
Product dimensions:
10.25(w) x 11.00(h) x 0.75(d)

Read an Excerpt

I am writing this in Gombe, on the veranda of my house overlooking Lake Tanganyika. The sun sinks a hug red globe, behind the Congo hills in the west. What better place to reflect on the past, relive the memories of my day, dream of the future. This morning Fifi greeted me, as she has for the past few years, soon after my arrival in the forest. Somehow she always seems to know! She wandered toward me, her eighth and most recent infant clinging to her back, then sat and looked directly into my eyes. I gazed back. Fifi is the one chimpanzee who was alive when I first set foot on Gombe's shores in 1960 who is still alive today. There are some memories that are shared by us alone, memories of the early sixties, when Fifi herself was an infant. Presently she got up and carried her daughter away, I heard later, from Hilali Matama, who heads up our Tanzanian team of field staff, that they joined a big group with Fifi's oldest sons, Freud and alpha male Frodo.

I stayed on to absorb the forest's spirit. I thought about the early days when infant Fifi rode into camp on old Flo's back, the older Figan and Faben following. How enchanted Fifi had been when Flo gave birth again, to infant Flint. Fifi and I together had watched and learned from Flo the best qualities of motherhood-techniques that I had practiced when raising my own son, Grub, and that Fifi is still using as she raises her extraordinarily large family.

....I was shocked to learn, during a conference in 1986, how rapidly chimpanzees were disappearing across their range in Africa. Numbering close to two million individuals at the turn of the century, a mere 150,000 (if that) remain, scattered (often in small fragmented groups that will almost certainly become extinct through inbreeding) across twenty-one African nations. Chimpanzees are threatened by habitat destruction, as increasing numbers of people need ever more land. Gombe itself is a tiny 30 square miles of forest utterly surrounded by cultivated field. Chimpanzees are caught in wire snares set up by hunters for antelopes, pigs, and so on. The chimps can break the wire, but lose hand or foot from the agonizingly tightened loop or die of gangrene. There are dealers who pay hunters to shoot mothers and take their infants for the live animal trade.

But the greatest threat to the continued existence of chimpanzees in their last stronghold, the great Congo Basin, is the so-called "bush meat trade." Logging roads enables hunters from the towns to travel into the heart of the last remaining forests. Shooting everything, from chimps and gorillas to small antelopes and birds, they truck the meat to markets in the towns-where many people prefer the flesh of wild animals and will pay more. Subsistence hunting enabled humans to live in harmony with nature for hundreds of years. The new commercial hunting is a pathway to extinction-for the Great Apes and all other wildlife.

...Now, as we move into the next millennium, we look ahead to further years of conservation, education, and caring. We, the Jane Goodall Institute-all our staff, members, and friends-are determined to make a positive impact on our world. Won't you join us?

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