Jane's Historic Military Aircraft Recognition Guide
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Jane's Historic Military Aircraft Recognition Guide

by Bernard Ireland, Tony Holmes
     
 

All the world's Historic Military Aircraft

From jet interceptors recently retired from military service to World War I bi-planes, Jane's Historic Military Aircraft Recognition Guide is a complete directory of military aircraft preserved today:

  • Recent photographs
  • Historic details
  • Technical data
  • Location guide

Overview

All the world's Historic Military Aircraft

From jet interceptors recently retired from military service to World War I bi-planes, Jane's Historic Military Aircraft Recognition Guide is a complete directory of military aircraft preserved today:

  • Recent photographs
  • Historic details
  • Technical data
  • Location guide

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780004721477
Publisher:
HarperCollins Publishers
Publication date:
09/28/1998
Pages:
512
Product dimensions:
7.61(w) x 4.98(h) x 1.36(d)

Read an Excerpt

Vought F4U and Goodyear FG-1 Corsair USA

Type: single-engined fighter Accommodation: pilot

Designed as a lightweight fighter tailored around the most powerful piston engine then available, Vought's prototype XF4U-1 was ordered by the US Navy in June 1938 following a study of their V-1 66 proposal. In order to harness the immense power of the Pratt Et Whitney XR-2800 Double Wasp engine, the largest diameter propeller ever fitted to a fighter up to that point in aeronautical history had to be bolted onto the front of the prototype - sufficient ground clearance for the prop was achieved through the use of a distinctive inverted gull wing. The future looked rosy for the aircraft, but modifications incorporated into the design as a result of lessons learned in combat over Europe detrimentally affected the Corsair. As a result of these problems it was left to land-based Marine Corps units to debut the aircraft in combat in early 1943 - the Fleet Air Arm also commenced operations with the Corsair that same year, but crucially from the decks of carriers. By mid-1 944 Vought had rectified the handling problems, and the Corsair became suitable for deck operations with the US Navy. Unlike other navy fighters, the Corsair enjoyed a prosperous postwar career, with both Vaught- and Goodyear-built aircraft remaining in service until after the Korean War. Indeed, the final F4U-7 (built for the French Aéronavale) did not roll off the Vought production line until 31 January 1952, this aircraft being the 12,571 1st, and last, Corsair built. Today, around 35 Corsairs remain airworthy, the majority of which are based in the USA.

Specification:

Dimensions:
Length: 33 ft 8 in (10.26 M)
Wingspan: 40 ft 11 in (12.47 m)
Height: 14 ft 9 in (4.50 M)

Weights:
Empty: 9205 lb (4175 kg)
Max T/O: 14 670 lb (6654 kg)

Performance:
Max Speed: 446 mph (718 kmh)
Range: 1560 miles (2511 km) Powerplant: Pratt Et Whitney R-2800-8W [F4U-1A/FG-1), R-2800-18W (F4U-4/-7) and R2800-32E(F4U-S)
Output: 2000 hp (1492 kW), 2450 hp (1827.70 kW) and 2850 Ina (2126-10 kW) respectively

First Flight Date:
29 May 1940

Surviving Airworthy Variant(s):
F4U-lA/-4/-4B/-5N/-5NL/-7 and FG-11)

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