Japan and Russia: The Tortuous Path to Normalization, 1949-1999

Overview

Why did Tokyo and Moscow fail to normalize relations in the 1990s? What was accomplished at times of intense negotiations? In this collection, experts from Japan, Russia, and the US explore the chronology of bilateral relations between Japan and Russia. Drawing on personal experiences as officials and consultants, the authors cover the period from 1991 to 1999 to show how Tokyo and Moscow differed in their assessments.

Read More Show Less
...
See more details below
Available through our Marketplace sellers.
Other sellers (Hardcover)
  • All (4) from $25.28   
  • New (1) from $44.85   
  • Used (3) from $25.28   
Close
Sort by
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Note: Marketplace items are not eligible for any BN.com coupons and promotions
$44.85
Seller since 2005

Feedback rating:

(24)

Condition:

New — never opened or used in original packaging.

Like New — packaging may have been opened. A "Like New" item is suitable to give as a gift.

Very Good — may have minor signs of wear on packaging but item works perfectly and has no damage.

Good — item is in good condition but packaging may have signs of shelf wear/aging or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Acceptable — item is in working order but may show signs of wear such as scratches or torn packaging. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Used — An item that has been opened and may show signs of wear. All specific defects should be noted in the Comments section associated with each item.

Refurbished — A used item that has been renewed or updated and verified to be in proper working condition. Not necessarily completed by the original manufacturer.

New
St Martin's Press / Palgrave, 2000. Hardcover. Brand new book, but without dust jacket. ISBN: 0312228775.

Ships from: Wellesley, MA

Usually ships in 1-2 business days

  • Canadian
  • International
  • Standard, 48 States
  • Standard (AK, HI)
  • Express, 48 States
  • Express (AK, HI)
Page 1 of 1
Showing All
Close
Sort by
Sending request ...

Overview

Why did Tokyo and Moscow fail to normalize relations in the 1990s? What was accomplished at times of intense negotiations? In this collection, experts from Japan, Russia, and the US explore the chronology of bilateral relations between Japan and Russia. Drawing on personal experiences as officials and consultants, the authors cover the period from 1991 to 1999 to show how Tokyo and Moscow differed in their assessments.

Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

International History Review
Arguably,never before has such a wealth of in-depth information on the subject of Russian-Japanese normalization appeared in one place.
Pacific Affairs
Gems in themselves providing interesting insights based on new research.
Library Journal
Rozman (Musgrave Professor of Sociology, Princeton; Russia and East Asia: The 21st Century Security Environment) has edited 16 papers by various authors who are either directly involved with or who have studied Russo-Japanese relations. For more than 40 years, these relations have been the poorest between any two industrialized countries. At the conclusion of World War II, the Soviet Union was allowed to annex the northern islands in the Kuriles (Chishima in Japanese), and negotiations to settle the territorial dispute began at the San Francisco Conference in 1951. Though various periods seemed like the "right time" to settle the dispute, each passed without a resolution. Japan's relations with the United States and with China, as well as U.S. relations with China, have further complicated the issue. This book features mild disagreement between Japanese and Russian contributors about visits of Gorbachev and Yeltsin to Japan in the 1990s. As usual, books by committee have strengths and weaknesses: there is a richness of opinion but a slight unevenness in writing style and ability. In addition, the 16 contributors are not sufficiently identified. Recommended for academic collections.--Harry Willems, Southeast Kansas Lib. System, Iola Copyright 2000 Cahners Business Information.\
Kirkus Reviews
Essays of varying interest and lucidity by international authorities who provide varying perspectives on the enduring inability of Japan and Russia to resolve a territorial dispute over the Kurile Islands. Resembling a string of pearls, the Kuriles lie between northern Japan and the Kamchatka Peninsula. Though considered part of Japan by the Japanese, the islands remain in the control of Russia, whose forces occupied them during the final days of WWII and whose leaders throughout the postwar period have consistently refused to return them. This dispute, according to editor Rozman (Sociology/Princeton Univ.) is the principal reason that Russo-Japanese relations "rank poorest among the great powers." Rozman has assembled an impressive cast of contributors to this project and has succeeded in presenting a balanced (if sometimes repetitive) discussion of the issues. Divided into three major sections, the volume first examines the background of Russo-Japanese relations (1949-84), moves to very recent events (1985-99), and concludes with five essays (including one by Rozman that is the best in the collection) that in various ways present the case that both sides share "the experience of fallen powers" and must readjust their thinking if progress is to occur. Although this territorial bone of contention has been perhaps too well-gnawed by the end, a number of the essayists make arresting points. Ambassador Sumio Edamura, for example, observes that Boris Yeltsin's "authoritarian and unpredictable" personality hampered negotiations. Deputy Foreign Minister Georgi Kunadze notes that it would have been easier to negotiate a settlement during the Soviet periodwhenthe Kremlin could have safely ignored contrary public opinion. And Tsuyoshi Hasogawa claims the problem is "largely a creation of the United States," whose Cold War, anti-Soviet policies made the USSR less willing to accommodate America's principal Pacific ally. Scholarly and often dense—but shows clearly how collisions of culture and history impede international relations.
Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780312228774
  • Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan
  • Publication date: 5/28/2000
  • Edition description: REV
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 400
  • Product dimensions: 5.74 (w) x 8.64 (h) x 1.34 (d)

Meet the Author

Gilbert Rozman is Musgrave Professor of Sociology at Princeton University.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Introduction
Part 1: Relations: 1949-1984
• The San Francisco Peace Treaty and the Definition of the Kurile Islands—Haruki Wada
• The Soviet-Japanese Postwar Peace Settlement in Retrospect—Boris Slavinsky
• Reconciliation in the Fifties: The Logic of Soviet Decision-Making—Alexei Zagorsky
• Two Decades of Soviet Diplomacy and Andrei Gromyko—Peter Berton
• Japan-Soviet Political Relations from 1976 to 1983—Hiroshi Kimura
Part 2: Relations: 1985-1999
• Japan-Soviet Relations under Perestroika: Perceptions and Interactions between Two Capitals—Nobuo Shimotomai
• Russian Decision-Making on Japan in the Gorbachev Era—Lisbeth L. Tarlow
• A Japanese View of Japan-Russian Relations between the August 1991 Coup and President Yeltsin’s State Visit of October 1993—Ambassador Sumio Edamura
• A Russian View of Russian-Japanese Relations in 1991-93—Deputy Foreign Minister Georgyi Kunadze
• Why Did Russia and Japan Fail to Achieve Rapprochement in 1991 to 1996?—Tsuyoshi Hasegawa
• Cross-Border Relations and Russo-Japanese Bilateral Ties in the 1990s—Gilbert Rozman
• Russo-Japanese Relations after Yeltsin’s Re-election in 1996—Konstantin Sarkisov
• Japanese-Russian Relations in 1997-99: The Struggle against Illusions—Shigeki Hakamada
Part 3: Mutual Influences and Comparisons
• Factors Shaping the Formation of Views on Japan in the USSR in the Postwar Period—Semyon Verbitsky
• Japanese Perceptions of the Soviet Union and Russia in the Postwar Period—Tsuyoshi Hasegawa
• Overcoming the Legacy of History: Japanese Public Relations in Russia, 1990-94—Akio Kawato
Nihonjinron and Russkaia Ideia : Transformation of Japanese and Russian Nationalism in the Postwar Era and Beyond—Tadashi Anno
• Japan and Russia: Great Power Ambitions and Domestic Capacities—Gilbert Rozman

Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)