Japan and the Third World: Patterns, Power, and Prospects

Japan and the Third World: Patterns, Power, and Prospects

by William R. Nester
     
 

Since 1945, Japan's policymakers have viewed geoeconomic rather than geopolitical influence as the most important source of power in an increasingly interdependent world political economy. Japanese policy toward the Third World is a vital part of its neomercantilist drive to transform Japan into an economic superpower and ensure Japan's comprehensive security.…  See more details below

Overview

Since 1945, Japan's policymakers have viewed geoeconomic rather than geopolitical influence as the most important source of power in an increasingly interdependent world political economy. Japanese policy toward the Third World is a vital part of its neomercantilist drive to transform Japan into an economic superpower and ensure Japan's comprehensive security. Essentially, Tokyo's Third World policy attempts to diversify Japan's foreign sources of markets, energy, and raw materials as widely as possible while making those sources dependent on Japanese goods, services, technology and capital. Tokyo concentrates on economically and politically penetrating and eventually dominating Third World countries while avoiding taking sides in regional conflicts. Increasingly Tokyo plays a diplomatic go-between role in regional conflicts which allows Japan to continue trading with both sides. Japanese aid remains overwhelmingly tied to sales of Japanese goods and services in the recipient country while lavish "gifts" to that country's political economic elite ensure policies beneficial to Japan. Japan and the Third World analyzes the range of means whereby Tokyo entangles strategic Third World countries and regions into an integrated global political economic web generating enormous wealth and power for Japan.

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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
Describes the Japanese government's policy of diversifying the country's Third World sources of markets, energy, and raw materials as widely as possible, while making those sources dependent on Japanese goods, services, technology, and capital. Also notes Japan's refusal to take sides in regional disputes, and her frequent role as mediator, which allows trade with both parties. Indexed only by proper names. Acidic paper. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR (booknews.com)

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780312072513
Publisher:
Palgrave Macmillan
Publication date:
07/01/1992
Pages:
260

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