The Japanese Americans

Overview

The experience of Japanese immigrants to North America was very different from that of other groups. In the 19th century Japan was a highly structured, isolated society. Little by little, however, Japanese students, scientists, and officials were allowed to come to the United States. The country's peasants were heavily taxed to pay for these trips. This in turn caused the peasants to leave-but in secret.
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Like New 2008. Library Binding. Fine.

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Overview

The experience of Japanese immigrants to North America was very different from that of other groups. In the 19th century Japan was a highly structured, isolated society. Little by little, however, Japanese students, scientists, and officials were allowed to come to the United States. The country's peasants were heavily taxed to pay for these trips. This in turn caused the peasants to leave-but in secret.
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Editorial Reviews

School Library Journal
Gr 4-7-These slender series entries emphasize Japanese and Chinese immigration to the U.S., particularly to Hawaii and California, but immigration to Mexico and Canada is briefly touched upon. The jobs and living conditions of the immigrants, and the prejudices they encountered, are covered. Contino includes material on the internment of Japanese Americans during World War II. However, the book is riddled with errors. There is no such person as "Emperor Edo." Terms like "the Edo government" and "shogun" are introduced with no background information. Children's picture-book author Taro Yashima is listed only as Jun Atsushi (minus his last name, Iwamatsu) in "Famous Japanese Americans." The caption accompanying a picture of cherry trees mentions the ones given to Washington, DC, "during the 19th century"; actually, it was in 1912. Chinese Americans is more reliable, but both books suffer from poor writing, with repetition, the inclusion of irrelevant material, and some patronizing language. Color and black-and-white photographs as well as many lengthy text boxes appear throughout; the typefaces are difficult to read. The chapter introductions to Dorothy and Thomas Hoobler's Japanese American Family Album (1996) and Chinese American Family Album (1998, both Oxford) include much of the same information.-Diane S. Marton, Arlington County Library, VA Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781422206102
  • Publisher: Mason Crest Publishers
  • Publication date: 9/1/2010
  • Series: Major American Immigration Series
  • Pages: 64
  • Age range: 9 - 12 Years
  • Lexile: 1130L (what's this?)
  • Product dimensions: 6.70 (w) x 9.30 (h) x 0.30 (d)

Table of Contents

Introduction: America's Ethnic Heritage Barry Moreno 7

1 Japan Steps into the Modern Era 11

2 The Journey to a New Life 17

3 Making a Living: Japanese Labor in Hawaii and the United States 23

4 Starting a Family in America 31

5 Working Toward Acceptance 39

6 Internment Camps and their Shameful Legacy 45

Famous Japanese Americans 54

Glossary 56

Further Reading 58

Internet Resources 60

Immigration Figures 61

Index 62

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