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Japanese Assimilation Policies in Colonial Korea, 1910-1945

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From the Late Nineteenth Century, Japan sought to incorporate the Korean Peninsula into its expanding empire. Japan took control of Korea in 1910 and ruled it until the end of World War II. During this colonial period, Japan advertised as a national goal the assimilation of Koreans into the Japanese state. It never achieved that goal. In Japanese Assimilation Policies in Colonial Korea, Mark Caprio examines why Japan's assimilation efforts failed. Utilzing government documents, personal travel accounts, diaries, ...

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Overview

From the Late Nineteenth Century, Japan sought to incorporate the Korean Peninsula into its expanding empire. Japan took control of Korea in 1910 and ruled it until the end of World War II. During this colonial period, Japan advertised as a national goal the assimilation of Koreans into the Japanese state. It never achieved that goal. In Japanese Assimilation Policies in Colonial Korea, Mark Caprio examines why Japan's assimilation efforts failed. Utilzing government documents, personal travel accounts, diaries, newspapers, and works of fiction, he uncovers plenty of evidence for the potential for assimilation but very few practical initiatives to implement the policy.

Japan's history of colonial rule included tactics used with peoples such as the Ainu and Ryukyuan that tended more toward obliterating those cultures than to incorporating the people as equal Japanese citizens. Following the annexation of Taiwan in 1895, Japanese policymakers turned to European imperialist models, especially those of France and England, in developing its assimilation policies. But, although Japan used rhetoric that embraced assimilation, the Japanese people themselves, from the top levels of government down, considered Koreans inferior and gave them few political rights. Segregation was built into everyday life. Japanese maintained separate communities in Korea, children were schooled in two separate and unequal systems, there was relatively limited intermarriage, and prejudice was ingrained. Under these circumstances, many Koreans resisted assimilation. By not actively promoting Korean-Japanese integration on the ground, Japan's rhetoric of assimilation remained just that.

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Editorial Reviews

Journal of Japanese Studies - Marie Seong-Hak Kim

The significance of addressing Japanese colonial rule in Korea in a broader comparative context cannot be exaggerated. Caprio had made a perceptive, innovative, and welcome contribution to expanding the scope of Japanese, Korean, and colonial studies.

American Historical Review

His main purpose is to show, first how the colonial rulers of Korea tried to manage the Korean population with political, social, cultural, and linguistic approaches filled with enormous internal contradictions and sophistry. His second purpose is to show how segments of Korean society collaborated with Japanese designs.... Caprio has fleshed out the theme of assimilation with rich detail and nuance and thrown a fresh light on the complex nature of Japanese rule in Korea and its limitations...

Korean Studies

Mark Caprio's Japanese Assimilation Policies in Colonial Korea is an illuminating account…. The crux of Caprio's work is that Japan, like other colonial regimes, made hollow promises related to assimilation for rhetorical ends rather than as a political or social goal…. Japanese Assimilation Policies in Colonial Korea makes a twofold contribution to Korean and Japanese studies, as well as the more general field of colonial studies by first providing the global context for Japan's colonization of Korea and, second, examining the debate among Japanese in the public sphere regarding the assimilation of Korea. It is a worthwhile and quick read that I highly recommend.

The Journal of Asian Studies

Mark Caprio's recent book is a wonderful addition to the field of Korean and Japanese modern history. Its appearance is particularly timely as Japan and Korea ponder the meaning of the centennial anniversary of the 1910 annexation.

Pacific Affairs

For many years, the Japanese Empire remained hidden behind an island-centered story of the archipelago's 'modernization' and a Euro-centric bias in colonial studies. This can no longer be the case with the publication of Mark E. Caprio's new book.

Journal of Military History

Caprio argues that, despite the Japanese championing of full acceptance and equality of the Korean people as subjects of the Empire, Japanese policies towards the Koreans worked as contradictory roadblocks preventing complete assimilation.... Caprio examines his historical question through an intricate framework of definitions of colonization... Additionally, his organizational choice of beginning his work with an examination of European influences on Japanese colonial thought is both interesting and appropriate considering Japan's desire to emulate the West.... Ultimately, Caprio delivers an impressive, solidly researched work that adds a further dimension to the complex historical problem of Japanese expansion..

Monumenta Nipponica

Mark Caprio, as an American scholar of Korean history teaching at Rikkyo University in Tokyo, is uniquely qualified to avoid the nationalistic extremes of the debate over the right and wrong, and the impact, of Japanese colonial rule. Using both Korean and Japanese sources, and an impartial eye, he examines one aspect of the colonial period, Japan's official policy of welcoming the Korean people into the Japanese political and cultural community, and he comes up with some startling conclusions.

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Product Details

Meet the Author

Mark E. Caprio is a professor in the Department of Intercultural Communications, Rikkyo University, Tokyo.

University of Washington Press

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Table of Contents

Acknowledgments vii

Introduction: Colonial Administration Decisions 3

1 Western Assimilation Practices 19

2 Japan's Development of Internal and Peripheral Assimilation 49

3 Forming Korean Assimilation Policy 81

4 Post-March First Policy Reform and Assimilation 111

5 Radical Assimilation under Wartime Conditions 141

6 Korean Critiques of Japanese Assimilation Policy 171

Conclusion: Evaluating Peripheral Colonization 198

Notes 213

Glossary 269

Bibliography 275

Index 303

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