Japanese Cooking: A Simple Art

Japanese Cooking: A Simple Art

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by Shizuo Tsuji, M. F. K. Fisher, Ruth Reichl, Yoshiki Tsuji
     
 

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Japanese food continues to grow in popularity in the United States. Yet enjoyment of Japanese cooking is still largely limited to an occasional night out at a Japanese restaurant. For far too long it has been assumed that this food is difficult to make in one's own kitchen. Actually, Japanese cooking is surprisingly simple. Raw ingredients should be glistening fresh

Overview

Japanese food continues to grow in popularity in the United States. Yet enjoyment of Japanese cooking is still largely limited to an occasional night out at a Japanese restaurant. For far too long it has been assumed that this food is difficult to make in one's own kitchen. Actually, Japanese cooking is surprisingly simple. Raw ingredients should be glistening fresh and of the best quality, and flavors, however elaborate, are built up from just two basic seasonings - dashi, an easily made, delicate stock, and shoyu, naturally brewed Japanese soy sauce. The cookbook is much more than an accumulation of recipes. In his preface, the author (whom Craig Claiborne calls "a sort of Renaissance man of Japanese and world gastronomy") discusses the essence of Japanese cooking, with its emphasis on simplicity, a balance of textures, colors, and flavors, seasonal freshness, and beauty of presentation.

After introducing ingredients and utensils, the 20 chapters of Part One are made up of lessons presenting all the basic Japanese cooking methods and principal types of prepared foods - grilling, simmering, steaming, noodles, sushi, pickles, and so on - with accompanying basic model recipes. Part Two consists of 130 carefully selected recipes. These range from simple dishes for daily fare to well-chosen challenges for the adventurous cook. Together with the 90-odd recipes included in Part One, these enable the cook to build up a repertory, dish by dish, from the basic everyday "soup and three" formula to a gala banquet. Whether preparing a snack for oneself or something special for friends, readers will find themselves reaching for this volume. Japanese Cooking: A Simple Art is a sourcebook of cooking concepts and recipes from one of the world's outstanding culinary traditions.

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher
. . .quite the most illuminating text around on Japanese food. . . Nigella Lawson

. . .this is much more than a cookbook. It is a philosophical treatise about the simple art of Japanese cooking. Appreciate the lessons of this book, and you will understand that while sushi and sashimi were becoming part of American culture, we were absorbing much larger lessons from the Japanese. We were learning to think about food in an entirely new way. from the new Foreword by Ruth Reichl

If Kurosawa had ignited my love for the country, Mr. Tsuji deepened and defined it. Jonathan Hayes in The New York Times

A complete guide to Japanese cooking, this collection is a must-have for anyone interested in Japanese food or culture. Publishers Weekly

My go-to for reference and classic recipes. Debra Samuels, The Boston Globe

A core addition to any and all personal, professional, or community library multicultural cookbook collections. Midwest Book Review

Still the foremost source book of cooking concepts and recipes from Japan. GlobalGourmet.com

Publishers Weekly

Easily the most comprehensive and exhaustive look at Japanese cuisine available, this groundbreaking classic marks its quarter-century anniversary in a revised edition with a new foreword by Gourmeteditor-in-chief Ruth Reichl and a new preface by the late Tsuji's son, Yoshiki Tsuji. Part cookbook, part philosophical treatise, this highly acclaimed collection offers a wealth of insight for amateurs and experts alike. Every technique associated with Japanese food is described step by step in great detail, along with illustrations to guide the reader through everything from filleting fish or cleaning an octopus to rolling omelets. Sections on the Japanese meal, ingredients and selecting and cutting fish, chicken and vegetables offer great insight into the culture as well as the food. The recipe section of the book is divided by cooking method rather than food type, including grilled and pan-fried, steamed, simmered and deep-fried. Dishes range from the simple, Pan-Broiled Salmon, to the more complex, Nagasaki-Style Braised Pork, and many dishes are vegetarian. Sushi and sashimi are covered in depth, as are knives, the proper way to slice the fish, and decorative presentations. A complete guide to Japanese cooking, this collection is must-have for anyone interested in Japanese food or culture. (Apr.)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781568363882
Publisher:
Kodansha International
Publication date:
02/17/2012
Edition description:
25th Anniversary Edition
Pages:
508
Sales rank:
152,315
Product dimensions:
7.60(w) x 10.10(h) x 1.80(d)

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Shizuo Tsuji (1935-1993) was the former head of the prestigious Tsuji Culinary Institute in Osaka, the largest school training professional chefs in Japan. The author of over 30 books on gastronomy, travel and music, he was a leading figure in the international culinary community. Japanese Cooking: A Simple Art was instrumental in popularizing Japanese cuisine in the West. Tsuji was also the author of Kodansha's bestselling Practical Japanese Cooking.

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Japanese Cooking: A Simple Art 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is so much more than a cook book. Half the book id devoted to explaining the many facets of Japanese cooking. Detail is given on ingredients, utensils, and the different styles of cooking in the first section of the book. This allows the reader to better understand and apply the recipes of the second part of the book. Not only is this book an excellent cookbook but also a great recipe book as well. An excellent reference for the novice and expert alike.
codeman3384 More than 1 year ago
After having bought and read many books on Japanese cuisine, I finally bought Mr. Tsuji's tome on Japanese cuisine. I discovered one thing almost immediately: Japanese Cooking is THE book to read if you want to learn more about the cuisine of Japan. It is the most comprehensive primer written in English, and it illustrates not just how to cook a dish, but the reasoning and philosophy behind the dish. A true marvel; a cut above the rest!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago