Japanese Cooking: A Simple Art

Japanese Cooking: A Simple Art

5.0 1
by Shizuo Tsuji, Yoshiki Tsuji
     
 

View All Available Formats & Editions

When it was first published, Japanese Cooking: A Simple Art changed the way the culinary world viewed Japanese cooking, moving it from obscure ethnic food to haute cuisine.

Twenty-five years later, much has changed. Japanese food is a favorite of diners around the world. Not only is sushi as much a part of the Western culinary scene as burgers, bagels, and

Overview

When it was first published, Japanese Cooking: A Simple Art changed the way the culinary world viewed Japanese cooking, moving it from obscure ethnic food to haute cuisine.

Twenty-five years later, much has changed. Japanese food is a favorite of diners around the world. Not only is sushi as much a part of the Western culinary scene as burgers, bagels, and burritos, but some Japanese chefs have become household names. Japanese flavors, ingredients, and textures have been fused into dishes from a wide variety of other cuisines. What hasn't changed over the years, however, are the foundations of Japanese cooking. When he originally wrote Japanese Cooking: A Simple Art, Shizuo Tsuji, a scholar who trained under famous European chefs, was so careful and precise in his descriptions of the cuisine and its vital philosophies, and so thoughtful in his choice of dishes and recipes, that his words—and the dishes they help produce—are as fresh today as when they were first written.
The 25th Anniversary edition celebrates Tsuji's classic work. Building on M.F.K.Fisher's eloquent introduction, the volume now includes a thought-provoking new Foreword by Gourmet Editor-in-Chief Ruth Reichl and a new preface by the author's son and Tsuji Culinary Institute Director Yoshiki Tsuji. Beautifully illustrated with eight pages of new color photos and over 500 drawings, and containing 230 traditional recipes as well as detailed explanations of ingredients, kitchen utensils, techniques and cultural aspects of Japanese cuisine, this edition continues the Tsuji legacy of bringing the Japanese kitchen within the reach of Western cooks.

Editorial Reviews

Publishers Weekly

Easily the most comprehensive and exhaustive look at Japanese cuisine available, this groundbreaking classic marks its quarter-century anniversary in a revised edition with a new foreword by Gourmeteditor-in-chief Ruth Reichl and a new preface by the late Tsuji's son, Yoshiki Tsuji. Part cookbook, part philosophical treatise, this highly acclaimed collection offers a wealth of insight for amateurs and experts alike. Every technique associated with Japanese food is described step by step in great detail, along with illustrations to guide the reader through everything from filleting fish or cleaning an octopus to rolling omelets. Sections on the Japanese meal, ingredients and selecting and cutting fish, chicken and vegetables offer great insight into the culture as well as the food. The recipe section of the book is divided by cooking method rather than food type, including grilled and pan-fried, steamed, simmered and deep-fried. Dishes range from the simple, Pan-Broiled Salmon, to the more complex, Nagasaki-Style Braised Pork, and many dishes are vegetarian. Sushi and sashimi are covered in depth, as are knives, the proper way to slice the fish, and decorative presentations. A complete guide to Japanese cooking, this collection is must-have for anyone interested in Japanese food or culture. (Apr.)

Copyright 2007 Reed Business Information
From the Publisher
. . .quite the most illuminating text around on Japanese food. . . Nigella Lawson

. . .this is much more than a cookbook. It is a philosophical treatise about the simple art of Japanese cooking. Appreciate the lessons of this book, and you will understand that while sushi and sashimi were becoming part of American culture, we were absorbing much larger lessons from the Japanese. We were learning to think about food in an entirely new way. from the new Foreword by Ruth Reichl

If Kurosawa had ignited my love for the country, Mr. Tsuji deepened and defined it. Jonathan Hayes in The New York Times

A complete guide to Japanese cooking, this collection is a must-have for anyone interested in Japanese food or culture. Publishers Weekly

My go-to for reference and classic recipes. Debra Samuels, The Boston Globe

A core addition to any and all personal, professional, or community library multicultural cookbook collections. Midwest Book Review

Still the foremost source book of cooking concepts and recipes from Japan. GlobalGourmet.com

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9784770030498
Publisher:
Kodansha USA
Publication date:
02/16/2007
Edition description:
Twenty-Fifth Anniversary Edition
Pages:
508
Product dimensions:
10.30(w) x 7.30(h) x 1.50(d)

Related Subjects

Meet the Author

Shizuo Tsuji (1935-1993) was the former head of the prestigious Tsuji Culinary Institute in Osaka, the largest school training professional chefs in Japan. The author of over 30 books on gastronomy, travel and music, he was a leading figure in the international culinary community. Japanese Cooking: A Simple Art was instrumental in popularizing Japanese cuisine in the West. Tsuji was also the author of Kodansha's bestselling Practical Japanese Cooking.

Customer Reviews

Average Review:

Write a Review

and post it to your social network

     

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

See all customer reviews >

Japanese Cooking: A Simple Art 4.5 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 4 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
This is so much more than a cook book. Half the book id devoted to explaining the many facets of Japanese cooking. Detail is given on ingredients, utensils, and the different styles of cooking in the first section of the book. This allows the reader to better understand and apply the recipes of the second part of the book. Not only is this book an excellent cookbook but also a great recipe book as well. An excellent reference for the novice and expert alike.
codeman3384 More than 1 year ago
After having bought and read many books on Japanese cuisine, I finally bought Mr. Tsuji's tome on Japanese cuisine. I discovered one thing almost immediately: Japanese Cooking is THE book to read if you want to learn more about the cuisine of Japan. It is the most comprehensive primer written in English, and it illustrates not just how to cook a dish, but the reasoning and philosophy behind the dish. A true marvel; a cut above the rest!
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
Anonymous More than 1 year ago