Japanese deities: Japanese goddesses, Japanese gods, Shinto kami, Amaterasu, Kotoamatsukami, Susanoo, Kitsune, Tengu, Inari kami, Watatsumi

Overview

Purchase includes free access to book updates online and a free trial membership in the publisher's book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Chapters: Kotoamatsukami, Inari Okami, List of Japanese Deities, Amatsu-Mikaboshi, Seven Lucky Gods, Tsukuyomi-No-Mikoto, Paantu, Yama-No-Kami. Excerpt: Inari , also Oinari) is the Japanese kami of fertility, rice, agriculture, foxes, industry and worldly success and one of the principal kami of Shinto. Represented as male, female, or ...

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Overview

Purchase includes free access to book updates online and a free trial membership in the publisher's book club where you can select from more than a million books without charge. Chapters: Kotoamatsukami, Inari Okami, List of Japanese Deities, Amatsu-Mikaboshi, Seven Lucky Gods, Tsukuyomi-No-Mikoto, Paantu, Yama-No-Kami. Excerpt: Inari , also Oinari) is the Japanese kami of fertility, rice, agriculture, foxes, industry and worldly success and one of the principal kami of Shinto. Represented as male, female, or androgynous, Inari is sometimes seen as a collective of three or five individual kami. Inari appears to have been worshipped since the founding of a shrine at Inari Mountain in 711 A.D., although some scholars believe that worship started in the late 5th century. Worship of Inari spread across Japan in the Edo period, and by the 16th century Inari had become the patron of blacksmiths and the protector of warriors. Inari is a popular figure in both Shinto and Buddhist beliefs in Japan. More than one-third (32,000)of Shinto shrines in Japan are dedicate to Inari. Modern corporations, such as cosmetic company Shiseido, continue to revere Inari as a patron kami, with shrines atop their corporate headquarters. Inari's foxes, or kitsune, are pure white and act as his/her messengers. Inari appears to a warrior. This portrayal of Inari shows the influence of Dakiniten concepts from Buddhism.Inari has been depicted both as male and as female. The most popular representations of Inari, according to scholar Karen Ann Smyers, are a young female food goddess, an old man carrying rice, and an androgynous bodhisattva. No one view is correct; the preferred gender of depiction varies according to regional traditions and individual beliefs. Because of his/her close association with kitsune, Inari is often believed to be a fox; though this belief is widespread, both Shinto and Buddhist priests discourage it. Inari also appears in the form ... More: http://booksllc.net/?id=471315

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781156844304
  • Publisher: General Books LLC
  • Publication date: 5/25/2010
  • Pages: 72
  • Product dimensions: 7.44 (w) x 9.69 (h) x 0.15 (d)

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