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A Japanese Robinson Crusoe
     

A Japanese Robinson Crusoe

1.6 3
by Jenichiro Oyabe
 

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First published in 1898 and long out of print, A Japanese Robinson Crusoe by Jenichiro Oyabe (1867-1941) is a pioneering work of Asian American literature. It recounts Oyabe's early life in Japan, his journey west, and his education at two historically Black collegès, detailing in the process his gradual transformation from Meiji gentleman to self-proclaimed

Overview

First published in 1898 and long out of print, A Japanese Robinson Crusoe by Jenichiro Oyabe (1867-1941) is a pioneering work of Asian American literature. It recounts Oyabe's early life in Japan, his journey west, and his education at two historically Black collegès, detailing in the process his gradual transformation from Meiji gentleman to self-proclaimed "Japanese Yankee." Like a Victorian novelist, Oyabe spins a tale that mixes faith and exoticism, social analysis and humor. His story fuses classic American narratives of self-creation and the self-made man (and, in some cases, the tall tale) with themes of immigrant belonging and "whiteness." Although he compares himself with the castaway Robinson Crusoe, Oyabe might best be described as a combination of Crusoe and his faithful servant Friday, the Christianized man of color who hungers to be enlightened by Western ways.

Product Details

BN ID:
2940023708881
Publisher:
The Pilgrim Press
Sold by:
Barnes & Noble
Format:
NOOK Book
File size:
286 KB

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Japanese Robinson Crusoe 1.7 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 3 reviews.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The first half of the autobiography is adventurous, but the second half of the story, and his life, loses its meaning, and wanders aimlessly. Also, the copy is full of typos and apparent omissions.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
This guy is convinced beyond a doubt that the west is so superior in its morals and culture to the eastern heathen barbarism he disdains. At times i felt i was reading from the perspective of a european traveler to some cannbalistic island in the nineteenth century when the author talks so poorly of his culture. I wonder if he lived to see the bombing of hiroshima and nagasaki by his noble christian americans would he see it as the hand of god crushing the heathen budhists and atheists? The man seems to have been brainwashed by the american misonaries in his youth to feel such a way about his rich cultural heritage.
Anonymous More than 1 year ago
The first half was interesting, and then it becomes very boring and unexciting.