Japan's Security Strategy in the Post-9/11 World: Embracing a New Realpolitik

Overview

In this book, Daniel Kliman argues that the years following September 11, 2001, have marked a turning point in Japan's defense strategy. Utilizing poll data from Japanese newspapers as well as extensive interview material, Kliman chronicles the erosion of normative and legal restraints on Tokyo's security policy. In particular, he notes that both Japanese elites and the general public increasingly view national security from a realpolitik perspective. Japan's more realpolitik orientation has coincided with a ...
See more details below
Other sellers (Paperback)
  • All (2) from $28.58   
  • New (1) from $28.58   
  • Used (1) from $104.99   
Sending request ...

Overview

In this book, Daniel Kliman argues that the years following September 11, 2001, have marked a turning point in Japan's defense strategy. Utilizing poll data from Japanese newspapers as well as extensive interview material, Kliman chronicles the erosion of normative and legal restraints on Tokyo's security policy. In particular, he notes that both Japanese elites and the general public increasingly view national security from a realpolitik perspective. Japan's more realpolitik orientation has coincided with a series of precedent-breaking defense initiatives. Tokyo deployed the Maritime Self-Defense Force to the Indian Ocean, decided to introduce missile defense, and contributed troops to Iraq's post-conflict reconstruction. Kliman explains these initiatives as the product of four mutually interactive factors. In the period after September 11, the impact of foreign threats on Tokyo's security calculus became ever more pronounced; internalized U.S. expectations exerted a profound influence over Japanese defense behavior; prime ministerial leadership played an instrumental role in deciding high profile security debates; and public opinion appeared to overtake generational change as a motivator of realpolitik defense policies. This book rebuts those who exaggerate the nature of Japan's strategic transition. By evaluating potential amendments to Article 9, Kliman demonstrates that Tokyo's defense posture will remain constrained even after constitutional revision.
Read More Show Less

Editorial Reviews

From the Publisher

"Kliman provides an insightful analysis of current Japanese defense policy and the rise of creeping realism, based on the Koizumi administration's pragmatic responses to external threats, pressures from the US, and generational change. Since 2001, Japan has shifted its strategic thought away from the caution of the postwar era, transforming its role in today's global security environment. The author describes a transitional realism where Tokyo clearly has been motivated by calculations of state interest rather than normative values. The author's evidence includes the expansion of Japan's role in international peacekeeping operations and regional agreements, the removal of past inhibitions against cooperation with the US on Ballistic Missile Defense, and the launch of real debate on a possible revision of the constitution's prohibition against using the Japanese military in action abroad. Kliman concludes that Koizumi's decisions to introduce Ballistic Missile Defense, endorse US actions in Iraq, and send Japanese personnel to participate in IraQ&Apos;s reconstruction indicate that Japan will continue down the path of becoming a normal nation, as a growing proportion of elites and the public continue to adopt more pragmatic views of national security. Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty."

-

Choice

Read More Show Less

Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780275990602
  • Publisher: ABC-CLIO, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 2/28/2006
  • Series: Washington Papers Series
  • Pages: 224
  • Product dimensions: 5.90 (w) x 8.90 (h) x 0.60 (d)

Meet the Author

DANIEL M. KLIMAN received his B.A. from Stanford University in California, was a Fulbright Fellow at Kyoto University in Japan, and is now pursuing a Ph.D. at Princeton University in New Jersey. He has been affiliated with the Institute for Defense Analyses in Washington, D.C., the Center for International Security and Cooperation at Stanford, and the Institute for International Policy Studies in Tokyo. In Washington, D.C., he has served in the Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Policy and the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations. He has also worked in the Political Section at the U.S. Embassy in Tokyo.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

1 Japan's strategic evolution 1
2 What if : scenarios of strategic change 22
3 Elite and public opinion : creeping realism 42
4 Japan and September 11 67
5 Under North Korea's shadow : Japan and missile defense 93
6 Japan, the Iraq War, and postconflict reconstruction 116
7 Transitional realism 146
8 Epilogue 163
Read More Show Less

Customer Reviews

Be the first to write a review
( 0 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(0)

4 Star

(0)

3 Star

(0)

2 Star

(0)

1 Star

(0)

Your Rating:

Your Name: Create a Pen Name or

Barnes & Noble.com Review Rules

Our reader reviews allow you to share your comments on titles you liked, or didn't, with others. By submitting an online review, you are representing to Barnes & Noble.com that all information contained in your review is original and accurate in all respects, and that the submission of such content by you and the posting of such content by Barnes & Noble.com does not and will not violate the rights of any third party. Please follow the rules below to help ensure that your review can be posted.

Reviews by Our Customers Under the Age of 13

We highly value and respect everyone's opinion concerning the titles we offer. However, we cannot allow persons under the age of 13 to have accounts at BN.com or to post customer reviews. Please see our Terms of Use for more details.

What to exclude from your review:

Please do not write about reviews, commentary, or information posted on the product page. If you see any errors in the information on the product page, please send us an email.

Reviews should not contain any of the following:

  • - HTML tags, profanity, obscenities, vulgarities, or comments that defame anyone
  • - Time-sensitive information such as tour dates, signings, lectures, etc.
  • - Single-word reviews. Other people will read your review to discover why you liked or didn't like the title. Be descriptive.
  • - Comments focusing on the author or that may ruin the ending for others
  • - Phone numbers, addresses, URLs
  • - Pricing and availability information or alternative ordering information
  • - Advertisements or commercial solicitation

Reminder:

  • - By submitting a review, you grant to Barnes & Noble.com and its sublicensees the royalty-free, perpetual, irrevocable right and license to use the review in accordance with the Barnes & Noble.com Terms of Use.
  • - Barnes & Noble.com reserves the right not to post any review -- particularly those that do not follow the terms and conditions of these Rules. Barnes & Noble.com also reserves the right to remove any review at any time without notice.
  • - See Terms of Use for other conditions and disclaimers.
Search for Products You'd Like to Recommend

Recommend other products that relate to your review. Just search for them below and share!

Create a Pen Name

Your Pen Name is your unique identity on BN.com. It will appear on the reviews you write and other website activities. Your Pen Name cannot be edited, changed or deleted once submitted.

 
Your Pen Name can be any combination of alphanumeric characters (plus - and _), and must be at least two characters long.

Continue Anonymously

    If you find inappropriate content, please report it to Barnes & Noble
    Why is this product inappropriate?
    Comments (optional)