Jason and the Argonauts

Jason and the Argonauts

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by John Malam
     
 

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Join Jason and his crew on his ship, the Argo, as he embarks on an epic voyage  to bring back the Golden Fleece.  He must take on high seas, hideous monsters, an army of skeletons, and a wicked uncle. Will he succeed?See more details below

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Overview

Join Jason and his crew on his ship, the Argo, as he embarks on an epic voyage  to bring back the Golden Fleece.  He must take on high seas, hideous monsters, an army of skeletons, and a wicked uncle. Will he succeed?

Editorial Reviews

Children's Literature
Part of the "Ancient Myths" series, the illustrations in this title will captivate the reader's interest and make him/her want to find out more about Jason and his adventures. A young reader can easily get absorbed in this witty picture book explaining the ancient Greek myth. The table of contents provides an outline of how the ancient myth of Jason unfolds. Everything from him being raised by the cartoon-like centaurs to him taking the Golden Fleece is fluidly-written and many of the illustrations provide humorous dialogue bubbles for the reader. An introduction, glossary, and an index are included. Readers will not struggle with the pronunciation of names of heroes, villains, and monsters woven through the book because of the "who's who" pronunciation key provided in the back. 2005 (orig. 2004), Picture Window Books, Ages 8 up.
—Rosa Roberts
School Library Journal
Gr 2-4-Each of these British imports begins with an almost-identical preface describing "The World of Ancient Mythology" and then moves on to an introduction that sets the scene. The narratives remain true to the original tales with little adaptation. The writing style in all three is clear but pedestrian. Boxes that provide additional background on people and places appear on every page. Unfortunately, in all three books, caricatures reminiscent of Saturday-morning cartoons illustrate even the most tragic or horrific of events, such as Hercules feeding Diomedes to his hungry horses (Hercules) or Medea tossing parts of a dismembered Pelias into a boiling cauldron (Jason). Cartoon buffoonery deflates the power of these stories, and dialogue bubbles-such as Hercules muttering "Come on, you fat pig!" as he drags the Erymanthian Boar-are equally jarring. Children would be better served by Malam's Gods and Goddesses (School Specialty, 1999).-Grace Oliff, Ann Blanche Smith School, Hillsdale, NJ Copyright 2005 Reed Business Information.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9781435151222
Publisher:
Sterling
Publication date:
09/12/2013
Series:
Ancient Greek Myths
Pages:
32
Sales rank:
503,077
Product dimensions:
9.54(w) x 10.42(h) x 0.38(d)
Age Range:
7 Years

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