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Overview

Linux is the fastest-growing Java development platform because it saves money and time by serving as a platform for both development and deployment. But developers face significant platform-specific challenges when managing and deploying Java applications in a controlled production environment.

Written for Java and Linux developers alike, Java™ Application Development on Linux® is the hands-on guide to the full Java application development lifecycle on Linux.

Determined to spare other developers hours of trial and error, Albing and Schwarz demonstrate the platform, tools, and application development by showing realistic, easy-to-follow examples. After a simple command-line application introduces basic tools, this program leads readers through business-logic object analysis, database design, Java servlet UIs, Java Server Pages (JSP) UIs, Swing GUIs, and Standard Widget Toolkit (SWT) GUIs. Scaling up to the enterprise level provides the opportunity to use both the JBoss Application Server and the Apache Geronimo Application Servers, and Enterprise JavaBeans (EJB).

Readers learn how to

  • Use development tools available on Linux, such as the GNU Compiler for Java (gcj), Ant, the NetBeans IDE, IBM's Eclipse Java IDE, JUnit, and SunONE Studio
  • Develop business logic layers using Java DataBase Connectivity (JDBC)
  • Add a Web interface using servlets and JSPs
  • Add a GUI using Sun's Abstract Window Toolkit (AWT) and IBM's SWT
  • Deploy EJBs in Linux

The authors conclude by demonstrating how a hierarchy of budgets can be created, tracked, and shared with Concurrent Versions System (CVS).

A companion Website includes all source code and a link to each tool described.

Java™ Application Development on Linux® can propel you from a standing start to the full-speed development and deployment of Java applications on Linux.

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Editorial Reviews

Slashdot.org
An extremely readable, very informative, and deep without being lengthy book. (The only complaint I have is that they tried to cover a little too much in a single book. EJBs, for instance, definitely warranted more coverage than they provided.) Carl and Michael use a very conversational tone, just as though they were sitting with you and giving you their personal attention. I found it enjoyable, interesting, and highly informative.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780131436978
  • Publisher: Prentice Hall
  • Publication date: 11/22/2004
  • Series: Bruce Perens' Open Source Series
  • Pages: 600
  • Product dimensions: 7.00 (w) x 9.22 (h) x 1.11 (d)

Meet the Author

Carl Albing is a programmer/analyst and consultant. With more than 20 years of industry experience, he has for several years been building business solutions using Linux and Java technologies. He has made technical presentations for conferences and corporations throughout the U.S., Canada, and Europe.

Michael Schwarz is a software engineer who has worked on Linux since its emergence. He is a frequent contributor to Linux Journal and the lead author of Multitool Linux (Addison-Wesley, 2002).

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Read an Excerpt

Java and Linux

Why another book on Java? Why a book on Java and Linux? Isn't Java a platform-independent system? Aren't there enough books on Java? Can't I learn everything I need to know from the Web?

No doubt, there are a host of Java books on the market. We didn't wake up one morning and say, "You know what the world really needs? Another book about Java!" No. What we realized was that there are a couple of "holes" in the Java book market.

First, Linux as a development platform and deployment platform for Java applications has been largely ignored. This is despite the fact that the *nixplatform (meaning all UNIX and UNIX-like systems, Linux included) has long been recognized as one of the most programmer-friendly platforms in existence. Those few resources for Java on Linux that exist emphasize tools to the exclusion of the Java language and APIs.

Second, books on the Java language and APIs have focused on pedagogical examples that serve to illustrate the details of the language and its libraries, but very few of these examples are in themselves practically useful, and they tend to deal only with the issues of writing programs, and not at all with deploying and maintaining them. Anyone who has worked on a major software project, especially a software project that is developed and deployed in a business for a business, knows that designing and coding are only about half of the work involved. Yes, writing Java code is only slightly affected by the development and the deployment platform, but the process of releasing and maintaining such applications is significantly different between platforms.

To address these missing pieces, we decided to cover development anddeployment of a Java application that has command-line, GUI, servlet, and enterprise components on a Linux platform. We're writing the guide book we wish we had had when we started writing and deploying Java applications on Linux. We're going to show you a simplistic enterprise application, "from cradle to grave," but along the way cover issues of design process, production environment, setup, administration, and maintenance that few books bother to cover.

If you are considering buying this book and you are wondering if there is any information in here that you can't get for free on the Web, then, no. There is not. In fact, there is little information in any Java or Linux book that is not available for free on the Internet. In fact, in each of our chapters we will tell you where on the Web to find virtually all of the information we present, and then some. And yet books continue to sell, and we have the chutzpah to ask you to buy the book. The reason is that Web information is scattered, unorganized, and of highly variable quality. We will be trying to bring all the relevant information together in this book, in a clearly organized manner (and, we would like to believe, at an acceptably high level of quality). We think that has value.

Also, this book is part of the Bruce Perens' Open Source Series. This book is part of the Web literature. And you may freely read it and use it on the Web. We hope this book will be one of those you use on the Web and buy on paper. We don't know about you, but we like to use Web books for reference, but for reading, we like books. We own at least three books that are available for free on the Web: Thinking in C++, Thinking in Java, and O'Reilly's Docbook: The Definitive Guide. We hope that open publishing will be the new model.

This is not to say this book is without purely pedagogical examples. Especially in Part I we make use of your typical "throwaway" examples and single classes. To try to illustrate the basics with a complete application would obscure and confuse the points being illustrated.Free Software and Java

GNU/Linux is Free Software. It is Open Source. I don't even want to start the debate on what each term means and which one is "right." One of the two authors of this book is a Free Software advocate, and the other is of a purely laissez-faire attitude towards the question (we won't tell you which, although we invite you to guess). But even with a deliberate decision to cease fire, the question remains: Is Java Open Source or Free Software?

The answer is mixed. Neither Sun's nor IBM's Java implementations are Open Source or Free Software. You may download and use them for free, but you do not have the source code to them, nor do you have the right to make modifications to them. This book will cover the GNU Compiler for Java, which compiles Java source code to native machine code. The GNU Compiler for Java (gcj) is both Open Source and Free Software. It is, however, supporting differing levels of the Java APIs (some packages are current, some are back at 1.1.x levels) and does not fully support the AWT or Swing GUIs.

However, none of this means that you cannot write your own Java programs and release them under a Free Software or Open Source license. So you can certainly develop Free Software in Java. Staunch Free Software partisans (such as Richard Stallman and the Free Software Foundation) would question the wisdom of doing so. Their argument would be that a Free Software product that depends on non-Free tools isn't really Free Software, since to compile, use, or modify it, you need to make use of a proprietary tool.

There is more than one effort to produce a Free Software Java runtime implementation. None of them is "ready for prime time." It would, in our opinion, be a very good thing for Sun to release their SDK and Java Virtual Machine as Free Software. But so far, they have steadily resisted calls to do so.

The fact, however, that two distinct vendors (Sun and IBM) produce effectively interchangeable development and runtime environments reduces some of the risk that you face when you select a platform available only from a single vendor who does not provide source code.

So, to put the case firmly: Java is free for use, but it is certainly not Free Software as defined in The GNU Manifesto (www.gnu.org/gnu/manifesto.html) or the GNU General Public License (www.gnu.org/copyleft/gpl.html). This is a political and philosophical issue of interest only to those aforementioned Free Software partisans. For the rest of us, this has no bearing on Java's technical or business merits. As for us, obviously we like the language or we wouldn't be writing about it.You Can Help!

This book is part of the Bruce Perens' Open Source Series. Shortly after this book is published in dead-tree form, it will be on the Web (www.javalinuxbook.com/), free for use, redistribution, and modification in compliance with the terms of the Open Publication License (www.opencontent.org/openpub/), with no options taken. You can immediately create your own version as permitted in that license.

Naturally enough, we plan to maintain our "official" version of the online book, so we encourage you to send suggestions, corrections, extensions, comments, and ideas to us. Please send any such to javalinux@multitool.net and we will try to keep our little tome up-to-date so it continues to serve the needs of the Java and Linux development communities.Acknowledgments

First off, we naturally wish to thank Mark L. Taub, our acquisitions editor at Prentice Hall PTR, for believing in the book and in open publishing as the way to put it out there. We also want to thank Bruce Perens for lending his name and powers of persuasion to open-content publishing through the Bruce Peren's Open Source Series. Thanks, too, to Patrick Cash-Peterson and Tyrrell Albaugh, who worked as our in-house production contacts, for all the behind-the-scenes work they did, including overseeing the cover.

In more direct terms of content, we owe major thanks to Kirk Vogen of IBM Consulting in Minneapolis for his article on using SWT with gcj, and for his kind help in allowing us to use the ideas he first presented in his IBM developerWorks articles; and to Deepak Kumar for graciously allowing us to base our build .

Thanks, too, to Andrew Albing for his help in drawing some of our diagrams,and to George Logajan and to Andy Miller for sharing their insights onthe more intricate details of Swing.

We also wish to express our great indebtedness to our technical reviewers, especially Andrew Hayes, Steve Huseth, and Dan Moore. A very large thank youis also due to Alina Kirsanova whose eye for detail, endless patience, and tenacity, and overall talent with proofng, layout, and more added so much refinement and improvement to the book. We are grateful for all their contributions. Any errors or omissions in this text are our fault and certainly not theirs. The book is much stronger for all their efforts.

There are likely many more people we ought to thank, especially those at Prentice Hall PTR, whose names and contributions we may never know, but we do know that this was an effort of many more people than just the authors, and we are grateful to them all.

Read More Show Less

Table of Contents

Preface.

Introduction.

I. GETTING STARTED.

1. An Embarrassment of Riches: The Linux Environment.

What You Will Learn.

The Command Line: What's the Big Deal?

Basic Linux Concepts and Commands.

Review.

What You Still Don't Know.

Resources.

2. An Embarrassment of Riches: Editors.

What You Will Learn.

Eye to Eye with vi.

Editors Galore.

Review.

What You Still Don't Know.

Resources.

3. An Experienced Programmer's Introduction to Java.

What You Will Learn.

Fundamental Language Elements.

Using (and Making) Java APIs.

Encapsulation, Inheritance, and Polymorphism.

O, Templates! Where Art Thou?

Virtually Final.

A Useful Simple Application.

Review.

What You Still Don't Know.

Resources.

Exercises.

4. Where Am I? Execution Context.

What You Will Learn.

A Simple Start.

The SystemClass.

The Properties Class.

The Runtime Class.

Review.

What You Still Don't Know.

Resources.

5. The Sun Microsystems Java Software Development Kit.

What You Will Learn.

All You Need, and Not One Thing More.

The Java Compiler.

The Java Runtime Engine.

Complete, Up-to-Date Program Documentation Made Easy.

Dispensing with Applets.

Going Native.

Introducing RMI.

The Java Debugger.

Return to the Source: The Java Decompiler.

Bundling a Java Program: Put It in a JAR.

The Rest of the Toolkit.

Review.

What You Still Don't Know.

Resources.

6. The IBM Developer Kit for Linux, Java 2 Technology Edition.

What You Will Learn.

Use Linux Features to Make Multiple Java SDKs Play Nicely Together.

How the IBM JDK Differs from the Sun JDK.

What Are All These "_g" Versions?

Review.

What You Still Don't Know.

Resources.

7. The GNU Compiler for Java (gcj).

What You Will Learn.

A Brand GNU Way.

The GNU Compiler Collection.

Compiling Our Simple Application with gcj.

Options and Switches.

Reasons to Use gcj.

Reasons Not to Use gcj.

Review.

What You Still Don't Know.

Resources.

8. Know What You Have: CVS.

What You Will Learn.

Source Control: Whys and Hows.

A GUI: jCVS.

Review.

What You Still Don't Know.

Resources.

9. Ant: An Introduction.

What You Will Learn.

The Need for a Different Build Tool.

Obtaining and Installing Ant.

A Sample Ant Buildfile.

Review.

What You Still Don't Know.

Resources.

10. Integrated Development Environments.

What You Will Learn.

NetBeans: The Open Source IDE.

SunONE Studio Community Edition.

Eclipse: The Source of SWT.

Review.

What You Still Don't Know.

Resources.

II. DEVELOPING BUSINESS LOGIC.

11. Balancing Acts: An Imaginary Scenario.

What You Will Learn.

Statement of the Need.

How to Develop Software.

What Makes a Good Requirement.

Whom to Ask for Requirements.

Requirements for the Budget Application.

Documenting, Prototyping, and Stakeholder Buy-In.

Review.

What You Still Don't Know.

Resources.

Exercises.

12. Analysis and Design: Seeking the Objects.

What You Will Learn.

Facing the Blank Page.

Using CRC Cards.

Finding the Objects.

Finding the Methods and Attributes.

Essential and Nonessential.

Analysis Paralysis.

Real Software Engineering.

Core Classes.

Review.

What You Still Don't Know.

Resources.

Exercises.

13. JUnit: Automating Unit Testing.

What You Will Learn.

JUnit: Why All the Fuss?

Design Then Test Then Code.

Installing and Running JUnit.

Writing Test Cases.

Running Test Suites.

Review.

What You Still Don't Know.

Resources.

Exercises.

14. Storing the Data.

What You Will Learn.

Follow the Objects.

Of Persistence.

Thinking of the Future, or Painting in Corners.

Oracle, PostgreSQL, MySQL.

Being Self-Contained.

Beyond the Basics.

Persistence Is Not the Whole Story.

Setting Up PostgreSQL for BudgetPro.

Review.

What You Still Don't Know.

Resources.

Exercises.

15. Accessing the Data: An Introduction to JDBC.

What You Will Learn.

Introducing JDBC.

Making Connections.

Querying Data.

Getting Results.

Updates, Inserts, Deletes.

Review.

What You Still Don't Know.

Resources.

Exercises.

III. DEVELOPING GRAPHICAL USER INTERFACES.

16. Getting in the Swing of Things: Designing a GUI for BudgetPro.

What You Will Learn.

A Simple Swing Program 342

Stompin' at the Savoy, or The Swing Paradigm.

Slow, Slow, Quick-Quick, Slow: The Basic Swing Objects.

Layout Managers.

Beyond Arthur Murray: Actions, Listeners, Events.

Getting Down to Cases: Designing a GUI for BudgetPro.

Review.

What You Still Don't Know.

Resources.

Exercises.

17. Other Ways: Alternatives to Swing.

What You Will Learn.

The IBM SWT Toolkit.

Porting BudgetPro to SWT.

SWT and gcj.

Review.

What You Still Don't Know.

Resources.

Exercises.

IV. DEVELOPING WEB INTERFACES.

18. Servlets: Java Pressed into Service.

What You Will Learn.

Servlets: Program-Centric Server-Side Documents.

Perspective.

How to Write a Servlet.

Input, Output.

Matters of State: Cookies, Hidden Variables,and the Dreaded Back Button.

Designing a BudgetPro Servlet.

Review.

What You Still Don't Know.

Resources.

Exercises.

19. JSP: Servlets Turned Inside Out.

What You Will Learn.

Servlets Turned Inside Out: JSP.

How to Write a JSP Application.

Using JSP with BudgetPro.

Review.

What You Still Don't Know.

Resources.

Exercises.

20. Open Source Web Application Servers.

What You Will Learn.

Downloading JBoss.

Be an Enabler, or "Let's Be Codependent!"

Installing JBoss.

Things That Make It Go.

Disposition of Forces.

Apache Geronimo.

Installing Geronimo.

Running the Geronimo Server.

Review.

What You Still Don't Know.

Resources.

V. DEVELOPING ENTERPRISE SCALE SOFTWARE.

21. Introduction to Enterprise JavaBeans.

What You Will Learn.

Expanding to EJBs.

What's in a Name? An Introduction to JNDI.

Review.

What You Still Don't Know.

Resources.

22. Building an EJB.

What You Will Learn.

EJBs: You Don't Know Beans?

Review.

What You Still Don't Know.

Resources.

23. Deploying EJBs.

What You Will Learn.

Lend Me Your EAR: Enterprise Packaging and Deployment.

Deploying the EAR.

Maintaining a Distributed Application.

Abstracting Legacy Applications.

Review.

What You Still Don't Know.

Resources.

24. Parting Shots.

The Future's So Bright, I Squint and Look Confused.

Our Book Is Yours.

Came the Revolution.

What You Still Don't Know.

Resources.

Appendix A. ASCII Chart.

Appendix B. A Java Swing GUI for BudgetPro.

Appendix C. GNU General Public License.

Index.

Read More Show Less

Preface

Java and Linux

Why another book on Java? Why a book on Java and Linux? Isn't Java a platform-independent system? Aren't there enough books on Java? Can't I learn everything I need to know from the Web?

No doubt, there are a host of Java books on the market. We didn't wake up one morning and say, "You know what the world really needs? Another book about Java!" No. What we realized was that there are a couple of "holes" in the Java book market.

First, Linux as a development platform and deployment platform for Java applications has been largely ignored. This is despite the fact that the *nixplatform (meaning all UNIX and UNIX-like systems, Linux included) has long been recognized as one of the most programmer-friendly platforms in existence. Those few resources for Java on Linux that exist emphasize tools to the exclusion of the Java language and APIs.

Second, books on the Java language and APIs have focused on pedagogical examples that serve to illustrate the details of the language and its libraries, but very few of these examples are in themselves practically useful, and they tend to deal only with the issues of writing programs, and not at all with deploying and maintaining them. Anyone who has worked on a major software project, especially a software project that is developed and deployed in a business for a business, knows that designing and coding are only about half of the work involved. Yes, writing Java code is only slightly affected by the development and the deployment platform, but the process of releasing and maintaining such applications is significantly different between platforms.

To address these missing pieces, we decided to cover development and deployment of a Java application that has command-line, GUI, servlet, and enterprise components on a Linux platform. We're writing the guide book we wish we had had when we started writing and deploying Java applications on Linux. We're going to show you a simplistic enterprise application, "from cradle to grave," but along the way cover issues of design process, production environment, setup, administration, and maintenance that few books bother to cover.

If you are considering buying this book and you are wondering if there is any information in here that you can't get for free on the Web, then, no. There is not. In fact, there is little information in any Java or Linux book that is not available for free on the Internet. In fact, in each of our chapters we will tell you where on the Web to find virtually all of the information we present, and then some. And yet books continue to sell, and we have the chutzpah to ask you to buy the book. The reason is that Web information is scattered, unorganized, and of highly variable quality. We will be trying to bring all the relevant information together in this book, in a clearly organized manner (and, we would like to believe, at an acceptably high level of quality). We think that has value.

Also, this book is part of the Bruce Perens' Open Source Series. This book is part of the Web literature. And you may freely read it and use it on the Web. We hope this book will be one of those you use on the Web and buy on paper. We don't know about you, but we like to use Web books for reference, but for reading, we like books. We own at least three books that are available for free on the Web: Thinking in C++, Thinking in Java, and O'Reilly's Docbook: The Definitive Guide. We hope that open publishing will be the new model.

This is not to say this book is without purely pedagogical examples. Especially in Part I we make use of your typical "throwaway" examples and single classes. To try to illustrate the basics with a complete application would obscure and confuse the points being illustrated.

Free Software and Java

GNU/Linux is Free Software. It is Open Source. I don't even want to start the debate on what each term means and which one is "right." One of the two authors of this book is a Free Software advocate, and the other is of a purely laissez-faire attitude towards the question (we won't tell you which, although we invite you to guess). But even with a deliberate decision to cease fire, the question remains: Is Java Open Source or Free Software?

The answer is mixed. Neither Sun's nor IBM's Java implementations are Open Source or Free Software. You may download and use them for free, but you do not have the source code to them, nor do you have the right to make modifications to them. This book will cover the GNU Compiler for Java, which compiles Java source code to native machine code. The GNU Compiler for Java (gcj) is both Open Source and Free Software. It is, however, supporting differing levels of the Java APIs (some packages are current, some are back at 1.1.x levels) and does not fully support the AWT or Swing GUIs.

However, none of this means that you cannot write your own Java programs and release them under a Free Software or Open Source license. So you can certainly develop Free Software in Java. Staunch Free Software partisans (such as Richard Stallman and the Free Software Foundation) would question the wisdom of doing so. Their argument would be that a Free Software product that depends on non-Free tools isn't really Free Software, since to compile, use, or modify it, you need to make use of a proprietary tool.

There is more than one effort to produce a Free Software Java runtime implementation. None of them is "ready for prime time." It would, in our opinion, be a very good thing for Sun to release their SDK and Java Virtual Machine as Free Software. But so far, they have steadily resisted calls to do so.

The fact, however, that two distinct vendors (Sun and IBM) produce effectively interchangeable development and runtime environments reduces some of the risk that you face when you select a platform available only from a single vendor who does not provide source code.

So, to put the case firmly: Java is free for use, but it is certainly not Free Software as defined in The GNU Manifesto (www.gnu.org/gnu/manifesto.html) or the GNU General Public License (www.gnu.org/copyleft/gpl.html). This is a political and philosophical issue of interest only to those aforementioned Free Software partisans. For the rest of us, this has no bearing on Java's technical or business merits. As for us, obviously we like the language or we wouldn't be writing about it.

You Can Help!

This book is part of the Bruce Perens' Open Source Series. Shortly after this book is published in dead-tree form, it will be on the Web (www.javalinuxbook.com/), free for use, redistribution, and modification in compliance with the terms of the Open Publication License (www.opencontent.org/openpub/), with no options taken. You can immediately create your own version as permitted in that license.

Naturally enough, we plan to maintain our "official" version of the online book, so we encourage you to send suggestions, corrections, extensions, comments, and ideas to us. Please send any such to javalinux@multitool.net and we will try to keep our little tome up-to-date so it continues to serve the needs of the Java and Linux development communities.

Acknowledgments

First off, we naturally wish to thank Mark L. Taub, our acquisitions editor at Prentice Hall PTR, for believing in the book and in open publishing as the way to put it out there. We also want to thank Bruce Perens for lending his name and powers of persuasion to open-content publishing through the Bruce Peren's Open Source Series. Thanks, too, to Patrick Cash-Peterson and Tyrrell Albaugh, who worked as our in-house production contacts, for all the behind-the-scenes work they did, including overseeing the cover.

In more direct terms of content, we owe major thanks to Kirk Vogen of IBM Consulting in Minneapolis for his article on using SWT with gcj, and for his kind help in allowing us to use the ideas he first presented in his IBM developerWorks articles; and to Deepak Kumar for graciously allowing us to base our build .xml file for EJBs off of a version that he wrote.

Thanks, too, to Andrew Albing for his help in drawing some of our diagrams,and to George Logajan and to Andy Miller for sharing their insights onthe more intricate details of Swing.

We also wish to express our great indebtedness to our technical reviewers, especially Andrew Hayes, Steve Huseth, and Dan Moore. A very large thank youis also due to Alina Kirsanova whose eye for detail, endless patience, and tenacity, and overall talent with proofng, layout, and more added so much refinement and improvement to the book. We are grateful for all their contributions. Any errors or omissions in this text are our fault and certainly not theirs. The book is much stronger for all their efforts.

There are likely many more people we ought to thank, especially those at Prentice Hall PTR, whose names and contributions we may never know, but we do know that this was an effort of many more people than just the authors, and we are grateful to them all.

Read More Show Less

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 17, 2005

    From Java newbie to Java developer in 567 pages

    When first embarking on a new journey into a programming language, the average traveler might want a map and a compass to show them where they are, where they're going and how to get there. If where you are is Java newbie and where you want to be is programming Java apps on the Linux platform, then _Java Application Development on Linux_ is a map and compass you can use to get from here to there. <p> This book is another in a long line of great technical reference books from Prentice Hall's Bruce Perens' Open Source Series. While some of the previous books I have revied from the series tended to be more in depth, this one has the benefit of starting out slow and covering all of the bases. You can know little to nothing about Java as a programming language and come out with a solid understanding of the fundamentals after the first few chapters. Anyone who has an object-oriented programming background will zip right through the opening pages, but for those that don't, spending a little more time will bring them into the ranks of the initiated. <p> All of the programming basics are covered, from constants to strings, from arrays to variables, and all of the fundamentals and not-so-fundamentals of object-oriented programming, like classes, methods, objects, properties and polymorphism. Then the reader is steadily moved along into more involved topics, like putting your Java classes into JAR files, how to use the Java debugger, the software development kit and so on. At the end of each chapter, there is a small section on what the reader still doesn't know. The purpose of this is to keep the reader clued in on their progress, explain what is to come and keep things moving along. All of which makes for a fast-flowing read. Generally this is hard to find in a technical book, many of which tend to be dry and boring for the most part with the index being the most read section. <p> By the end, the now initiated reader will explore programming applications for various interfaces and APIs, including Swing, SWT and JSP, and will even find out what JavaBeans are and how to use them and what JNDI is and how it can work for you. <p> With all that said, this is a fundamental resource book for anyone who would want to learn how to program Java applications under Linux. Much of the information can be borrowed to develop applications on other platforms as well. The introduction and first few chapters of this book are extremely informative and give the reader an excellent comprehension of Java as an object-oriented programming language and all of the fundamentals he will need to go further as an application developer. The later chapters tend toward information overload, and while the information is good, some things are skipped over to save time and space. It may have been better to separate this book into two different volumes, giving the second half twice as many pages and more room to breathe. But overall, this is still an excellent technical book and adequately achieves its main goal of making a beginner application developer out of a Java layman.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted January 18, 2005

    Extremely readable, very informative, and deep without being lengthy

    <p>Java was developed to be a cross-platform language. 'Write Once, Run Anywhere' is the slogan, and an admirable ideal to attempt to reach. So when I first saw the title of the book <i>Java Application Development on Linux</i>, I expected to find descriptions of some idiosyncrasies in the Linux environment that affected the 'Run Anywhere' part of the equation. What I got was a lot more. <p>The authors, Carl Albing and Michael Schwarz, chose to create a book that is a complete guide to writing commercial-quality Java programs. They focused on how to use the tools of Linux to assist in the creation of Java programs. The book is broken up into five major parts: Getting Started, Developing Business Logic, Developing Graphical User Interfaces, Developing Web Interfaces, and Developing Enterprise Scale Software. Each chapter is self-contained, and the reader can choose what they read without losing track. Each chapter starts with a summary of what you'll learn, and concludes with a 'What You Still Don't Know' section. <p>Part I provides a 10-chapter overview of Linux, Java, the SDK's (Software Development Kits) from Sun and IBM, version control via CVS, and IDEs. The first two chapters cover a sampling of command-line Linux, plus the Vi editor to create your programs. Chapter 3 gives you a overview of the Java language, and Chapter 4 covers how the program can deal with the context in which it's running. The next two chapters cover Sun's SDK and IBM's development kit (briefly). Chapter 7 describes how to use the GNU Compiler for Java (gcj) to create native-code programs. <p>Larger programs definitely need some form of source control, so the widely available Concurrent Versioning System (CVS) is clearly described out. For building and deploying the numerous files of a larger project, Ant provides value beyond what the make facility can offer. Finally, Integrated Development Environments (IDEs) are covered. The focus is on NetBeans, but SunONE Studio Community Edition and Eclipse are also covered. <p>If the book stopped after Part I, you would still have a valuable addition to your bookshelf. However, Part II continues with a five-chapter discussion on how to get requirements, documentation, and buy-in; how to analyze the program and discover the objects to be created; automated testing with JUnit; storing data in databases using Oracle, PostgreSQL, and MySQL; and using the Java Database Connector (JDBC) to access them. <p>Most users want some form of a graphical user interface (GUI) to access the program and their data. Part III describe how to create a GUI using Swing and the Standard Widget Toolkit (SWT). <p>By far the most popular way to access programs is via a browser. Part IV describes Java Servlets and JSP (JavaServer Pages), and also talks about two Java-based web application servers (JBoss and Geronimo). <p>Finally, Part V covers Enterprise JavaBeans (EJBs) in what the authors describe as 'an almost criminally brief introduction'. While it is definitely an overview, they still cover more than enough about EJBs to get you rolling. They wrap up the book with a plea for help. The book is an Open Content book, and therefore they are requesting comments, suggestions, and patch files to help improve the text and examples. <p>I have to admit that <i>Java Application Development on Linux</i> is an extremely readable, very informative, and deep without being lengthy book. The tone used by Carl and Michael was very conversational. I found it enjoyable, interesting, and highly informative. The only complaint I have is that they tried to cover a little too much in a single book. EJBs definitely warranted more coverage than they provided. In all, I rate it a 4 out of 5.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 22, 2004

    spans much Java usage

    I read this book with especial interest. For it pertains directly to my work environment of Java programming under linux. So I was curious to see what the authors have to say. The book explains simple linux level commands like grep, find, tar and zip. Because in practical terms, your Java project will have files scattered across various directories. Outside of your source files, you'll need these commands for maintenance. Also, vi is covered, including its improved variant vim. The latter is nice since it has colour coding of Java keywords. Makes editing much easier. Later on, the book covers the Sun and IBM SDKs. Free and easy to use. The data storage chapter is concise; perhaps too much so. For realistic applications using JDBC to hook to MySQL, Oracle or other databases, you may need more thorough coverage elsewhere. Likewise with the section on building a UI in Java. For completeness they have a brief discussion. The authors also strive to include discussion of higher layers built in Java. For enterprise level applications. So they go into JSP, servlets and EJBs. Enough detail is given to understand the gist, and to see how to fit these together. A commendable effort, given the vastness of current Java packages.

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