The Java Class Libraries Volume 1: java.io, java.lang, java.math, ,java.net, java.text,,java.util / Edition 2

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Overview

creators of the Java technology at Sun Microsystems is an essential resource for both novice and experienced Java programmers. The information is presented in an easy-to-use, dictionary-like format. The packages covered in this book are:

java.io java.net
java.lang java.text
java.lang.reflect java.util
java.math java.util.zip

The extensive class and member descriptions contain details crucial for developing robust and professional applets and applications. Each description is supplemented by an example that demonstrates the class or member in a relevant context. The 24,000 lines of code in over 600 examples facilitate learning-by-example and provide useful code fragments for your projects. Each class description includes:

  • a class hierarchy diagram showing its connection to related classes
  • a detailed overview describing its purpose and key concepts
  • a convenient member summary that briefly describes each member and arranges the members into related groups
  • an example demonstrating the class in a "real-world" context
  • comprehensive descriptions and an example for each member



This massive compendium provides definitive Java 1.1 class libraries and Java 1.1 deprecated class libraraies. This example-oriented guide shows object creation, event handling, and related object use. Like the first edition, this text is alphabetized and organized for easy reference. This volume covers the following eight packages: io, lang, lang.reflect, math, net, text, util and util.zip. It includes package overviews and a reference of classes. Classes are diagrammed within hierarchies, which include ancestors of the class, siblings, descendants and interfaces. This book also contains class descriptions, member descriptions and summaries.

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Editorial Reviews

Booknews
The definitive, official reference to the Java 1.1 class libraries for Java programmers. The extensive class and member descriptions contain details crucial for developing professional applets and applications. Each description is supplemented by an example demonstrating the class or member in a relevant context. The 24,000 lines of code in some 600 examples facilitate learning-by-example and offer useful code fragments for projects. Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Or.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780201310023
  • Publisher: Addison-Wesley
  • Publication date: 3/4/1998
  • Series: Addison-Wesley Java Series
  • Edition description: 2nd
  • Edition number: 2
  • Pages: 2080
  • Product dimensions: 7.70 (w) x 9.54 (h) x 2.47 (d)

Meet the Author


Doug Kramer is a lead writer for the Java Development Kit and Senior Technical Writer at JavaSoft, Sun Microsystems, Inc. He previouslyworked at Kaleida Labs and Macromind, documenting multimedia technology anddesigning graphical user interfaces.

Patrick Chan was a founding member and lead developer of the original Java project at Sun. He is now owner of Xeo Interactive, a design firm specializing in Java-based multimedia and web interfaces.

Rosanna Lee is a Staff Engineer at JavaSoft. She is one of the principal designers and developers of Java Naming and Directory Interface (JNDI) and X/Open Federated Naming (XFN).

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Read an Excerpt

PREFACE:

How to Use This Book

This book is intended as a reference rather than a tutorial. Its format is similar to a dictionary's in that it is designed to optimize the time it takes for you to look up information on a class or class member. For a tutorial-style presentation of the class libraries, see The JavaTM Tutorial, by Mary Campione and Kathy Walrath. The JavaTM Class Libraries does not explain any part of the Java language. There are several books you can use to learn the language. These include The JavaTM Programming Language, by Ken Arnold and James Gosling, and The JavaTM Language Specification, by James Gosling, Bill Joy, and Guy Steele.

Following is an overview of this book.

Package Overviews

This part briefly describes each package and all of the classes in it. Also included are diagrams that show the inheritance hierarchy of the classes that appear in a package.

Alphabetical Reference of Classes

This part covers the alphabetical listing of the classes from the following packages:

java.io
java.lang
java.lang.reflect
java.math
java.net
java.text
java.util
java.util.zip

Probably the most notable aspect about the structure of this book is the order in which the classes appear. Most Java books that contain an API alphabetically order the classes within a package and then alphabetically order the packages. The problem with this format is that it always takes two or more steps to locate a class. If you do not know which package contains the class you're lookingfor, you basically need to review each package looking for the class. If you do know which package, you first need to find the package and then find the class.

The classes in this book are ordered alphabetically without regard to package name. This makes looking up a class as straightforward as looking up a word in a dictionary.

Each class is described in its own chapter. Each chapter contains a picture of the class hierarchy, a class description, a class example, a member summary, and descriptions for every member in the class.

Class Hierarchy Diagrams

We include a class diagram for each class in the Java API. The class diagram shows all of the ancestors of the class, its siblings, its immediate descendents, and any interfaces that the class implements. In these diagrams, if a package name precedes a class or interface name, the class or interface is not in the same package as the current class.

In the diagrams, we visually distinguish the different kinds of Java entities, as follows:

  1. The interface: A rounded rectangle
  2. The class: A rectangle
  3. The abstract class: A rectangle with an empty dot
  4. The final class: A rectangle with a black dot
  5. Classes with subclasses: A rectangle with a small black triangle on the lower right corner

Most of these elements are shown in Figure i. The class or interface being described in the current chapter is shaded grey. A solid line represents extends, while a dotted line represents implements.

Class Descriptions

In the class descriptions, we describe all of the properties of the class. For example, the properties of the Graphics class include the current color, font, paint mode, origin, and clipping area. Describing in one place all of a class's available properties and how the properties behave makes learning all of the capabilities of a class much easier than if the property descriptions were scattered throughout the member descriptions.

Any terminology used in the member descriptions is introduced and described in the class descriptions. If you find that the member description lacks detail, go to the class description for more information.

Class Examples

Ideally, we would have included a unique example for every single member in the Java API. We simply did not have enough time. So we tried to make sure that every member appeared in at least one example.

We worked to make the examples as useful as possible so that they demonstrate the member as it would typically be used. For example, in the example for a button we not only show how a button is created; we also show how button events are handled. In some cases, we also try to demonstrate some other class in the Java API. For example, in the Graphics.draw-Oval() example, we demonstrate not only how to draw an oval; we also show how to use the BufferedReader class to read integers from standard input that are used to locate the oval. We feel that gently introducing other classes in the Java API is a good way to help you become aware of all available classes in the Java API, as long as the introduction does not confuse the example.

Member Summaries

The Member Summary section for each class is intended to help the reader quickly grasp the key points of the class. It groups the members of the class into categories that are specific to that class. For example, in the List class the Selection Methods category lists all methods having to do with selections. It is meant to be a quick summary of the class's members, so it does not contain any syntax information other than the name of the member.

Member Descriptions

The member descriptions appear in alphabetical order within a class chapter regardless of what kind of method or field they are. This was done to make locating a member proceed as fast as possible.

Overloaded methods are placed together in one member description because they share very similar functionality. The different overloaded forms are typically provided as a convenience for the programmer when specifying parameters. For instance, some overloads eliminate parameters by providing common defaults. To describe overloads with missing parameters, we use a phrase of the form "if the parameter p is not specified, it defaults to the value 3.14." Other overloads take different representations of a value. For example, one overload could take a particular parameter as an integer, while another could take the same parameter as a string containing an integer.

Each member description contains some or all of the following fields:

PURPOSE A brief description of the purpose of this member
SYNTAX The syntactic declaration of this member
DESCRIPTION A full description of this member
PARAMETERS The parameters accepted by this member, if any, listed in alphabetical order
RETURNS The value and its range returned by this member, if any
EXCEPTIONS The exceptions and errors thrown by this member, if any, listed in alphabetical order
SEE ALSO Other related classes or members, if any, listed in alphabetical order
OVERRIDES The method that this member overrides, if any
EXAMPLE A code example that illustrates how this member is used. This is sometimes a reference to an example that illustrates the use of this method in another member example or class example.

Deprecation

A method or class is deprecated if its use is no longer recommended. A deprecated method appears in the Member Summary under the Deprecated Methods section. In the chapter body, the deprecated method is annotated by a "deprecated" tag in its method heading. For example, Component.size() is a deprecated method. It has the following method heading:

size() DEPRECATED

If not all of the overloaded forms of the method are deprecated, a "deprecated" tag appears beside the syntax of the deprecated forms. For example, one of the two forms of BorderLayout.addLayoutComponent() is deprecated. The second form shown below—the one with the "deprecated" tag—is deprecated.

SYNTAX public void addLayoutComponent(Component comp, Object location)
    DEPRECATED public void addLayoutComponent(String location, Component comp)

The method description contains a deprecation section with instructions on how to replace the usage of the deprecated method, like this:

DEPRECATION     A description of how to replace the usage of this deprecated method

How to Access the Examples

All of the code examples in this book have been compiled and run on the FCS version of Java 1.1.4, either on Solaris or Windows NT or both. Most of the complete examples are available on-line. You can access them and other information about this book by using the URL

...

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Table of Contents

List of Figures.
List of Tables.
Preface.
Package Overviews.
java io.
java lang.
java lang reflect.
java math.
java net.
java text.
java util.
java util zip.

Alphabetical Reference of Classes.
Abstract Method Error.
Adler32.
Arithmetic Exception.
Array.
Array Index Out Of Bounds Exception.
Array Store Exception.
Big Decimal.
Big Integer.
Bind Exception.
Bit Set.
Boolean.
Break Iterator.
Buffered Input Stream.
Buffered Output Stream.
Buffered Reader.
Buffered Writer.
Byte.
Byte Array Input Stream.
Byte Array Output Stream.
Calendar.
Character.
Character Iterator.
Char Array Reader.
Char Array Writer.
Char Conversion Exception.
Checked Input Stream.
Checked Output Stream.
Checksum.
Choice Format.
Class.
Class Cast Exception.
Class Circularity Error.
Class Format Error.
Class Loader.
Class Not Found Exception.
Cloneable.
Clone Not Supported Exception.
Collation Element Iterator.
Collation Key.
Collator.
Compiler.
Connect Exception.
Constructor.
Content Handler.
Content Handler Factory.
CRC32.
Data Format Exception.
Datagram Packet.
Datagram Socket.
Datagram Socket Impl.
Data Input.
Data Input Stream.
Data Output.
Data Output Stream.
Date.
Date Format.
Date Format Symbols.
Decimal Format.
Decimal Format Symbols.
Deflater.
Deflater Output Stream.
Dictionary.
Double.
Empty Stack Exception.
Enumeration.
EOF Exception.
Error.
Event Listener.
Event Object.
Exception.
Exception In Initializer Error.
Externalizable.
Field.
FieldPosition.
File.
File Descriptor.
File Input Stream.
Filename Filter.
Filename Map.
File Not Found Exception.
File Output Stream.
File Reader.
File Writer.
Filter Input Stream.
Filter Output Stream.
Filter Reader.
Filter Writer.
Float.
Format.
Gregorian Calendar.
GZIP Input Stream.
GZIP Output Stream.
Hashtable.
Http URL Connection.
Illegal Access Error.
Illegal Access Exception.
Illegal Argument Exception.
Illegal Monitor State Exception.
Illegal State Exception.
Illegal Thread State Exception.
Incompatible Class Change Error.
Index Out Of Bounds Exception.
Inet Address.
Inflater.
Inflater Input Stream.
Input Stream.
Input Stream Reader.
Instantiation Error.
Instantiation Exception.
Integer.
Internal Error.
Interrupted Exception.
Interrupted IO Exception.
Invalid Class Exception.
Invalid Object Exception.
Invocation Target Exception.
IO Exception.
Line Number Input Stream.
Line Number Reader.
Linkage Error.
List Resource Bundle.
Locale.
Long.
Malformed URL Exception.
Math.
Member.
Message Format.
Method.
Missing Resource Exception.
Modifier.
Multicast Socket.
Negative Array Size Exception.
No Class Def Found Error.
No Route To Host Exception.
No Such Element Exception.
No Such Field Error.
No Such Field Exception.
No Such Method Error.
No Such Method Exception.
Not Active Exception.
Not Serializable Exception.
Null Pointer Exception.
Number.
Number Format.
Number Format Exception.
Object.
Object Input.
Object Input Stream.
Object Input Validation.
Object Output.
Object Output Stream.
Object Stream Class.
Object Stream Exception.
Observable.
Observer.
Optional Data Exception.
Out Of Memory Error.
Output Stream.
Output Stream Writer.
Parse Exception.
Parse Position.
Piped Input Stream.
Piped Output Stream.
Piped Reader.
Piped Writer.
Print Stream.
Print Writer.
Process.
Properties.
Property Resource Bundle.
Protocol Exception.
Pushback Input Stream.
Pushback Reader.
Random.
Random Access File.
Reader.
Resource Bundle.
Rule Based Collator.
Runnable.
Runtime.
Runtime Exception.
Security Exception.
Security Manager.
Sequence Input Stream.
Serializable.
Server Socket.
Short.
Simple Date Format.
Simple Time Zone.
Socket.
Socket Exception.
Socket Impl.
Socket Impl Factory.
Stack.
Stack Overflow Error.
Stream Corrupted Exception.
Stream Tokenizer.
String.
String Buffer.
String Buffer Input Stream.
String Character Iterator.
String Index Out Of Bounds Exception.
String Reader.
String Tokenizer.
String Writer.
Sync Failed Exception.
System.
Thread.
Thread Death.
Thread Group.
Throwable.
Time Zone.
Too Many Listeners Exception.
Unknown Error.
Unknown Host Exception.
Unknown Service Exception.
Unsatisfied Link Error.
Unsupported Encoding Exception.
URL.
URL Connection.
URL Encoder.
URL Stream Handler.
URL Stream Handler Factory.
UTF Data Format Exception.
Vector.
Verify Error.
Virtual Machine Error.
Void.
Write Aborted Exception.
Writer.
Zip Entry.
Zip Exception.
Zip File.
Zip Input Stream.
Zip Output Stream.
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Preface

PREFACE:

How to Use This Book

This book is intended as a reference rather than a tutorial. Its format is similar to a dictionary's in that it is designed to optimize the time it takes for you to look up information on a class or class member. For a tutorial-style presentation of the class libraries, see The JavaTM Tutorial, by Mary Campione and Kathy Walrath. The JavaTM Class Libraries does not explain any part of the Java language. There are several books you can use to learn the language. These include The JavaTM Programming Language, by Ken Arnold and James Gosling, and The JavaTM Language Specification, by James Gosling, Bill Joy, and Guy Steele.

Following is an overview of this book.

Package Overviews

This part briefly describes each package and all of the classes in it. Also included are diagrams that show the inheritance hierarchy of the classes that appear in a package.

Alphabetical Reference of Classes

This part covers the alphabetical listing of the classes from the following packages:

java.io
java.lang
java.lang.reflect
java.math
java.net
java.text
java.util
java.util.zip

Probably the most notable aspect about the structure of this book is the order in which the classes appear. Most Java books that contain an API alphabetically order the classes within a package and then alphabetically order the packages. The problem with this format is that it always takes two or more steps to locate a class. If you do not know which package contains the class you'relookingfor, you basically need to review each package looking for the class. If you do know which package, you first need to find the package and then find the class.

The classes in this book are ordered alphabetically without regard to package name. This makes looking up a class as straightforward as looking up a word in a dictionary.

Each class is described in its own chapter. Each chapter contains a picture of the class hierarchy, a class description, a class example, a member summary, and descriptions for every member in the class.

Class Hierarchy Diagrams

We include a class diagram for each class in the Java API. The class diagram shows all of the ancestors of the class, its siblings, its immediate descendents, and any interfaces that the class implements. In these diagrams, if a package name precedes a class or interface name, the class or interface is not in the same package as the current class.

In the diagrams, we visually distinguish the different kinds of Java entities, as follows:

  1. The interface: A rounded rectangle
  2. The class: A rectangle
  3. The abstract class: A rectangle with an empty dot
  4. The final class: A rectangle with a black dot
  5. Classes with subclasses: A rectangle with a small black triangle on the lower right corner

Most of these elements are shown in Figure i. The class or interface being described in the current chapter is shaded grey. A solid line represents extends, while a dotted line represents implements.

Class Descriptions

In the class descriptions, we describe all of the properties of the class. For example, the properties of the Graphics class include the current color, font, paint mode, origin, and clipping area. Describing in one place all of a class's available properties and how the properties behave makes learning all of the capabilities of a class much easier than if the property descriptions were scattered throughout the member descriptions.

Any terminology used in the member descriptions is introduced and described in the class descriptions. If you find that the member description lacks detail, go to the class description for more information.

Class Examples

Ideally, we would have included a unique example for every single member in the Java API. We simply did not have enough time. So we tried to make sure that every member appeared in at least one example.

We worked to make the examples as useful as possible so that they demonstrate the member as it would typically be used. For example, in the example for a button we not only show how a button is created; we also show how button events are handled. In some cases, we also try to demonstrate some other class in the Java API. For example, in the Graphics.draw-Oval() example, we demonstrate not only how to draw an oval; we also show how to use the BufferedReader class to read integers from standard input that are used to locate the oval. We feel that gently introducing other classes in the Java API is a good way to help you become aware of all available classes in the Java API, as long as the introduction does not confuse the example.

Member Summaries

The Member Summary section for each class is intended to help the reader quickly grasp the key points of the class. It groups the members of the class into categories that are specific to that class. For example, in the List class the Selection Methods category lists all methods having to do with selections. It is meant to be a quick summary of the class's members, so it does not contain any syntax information other than the name of the member.

Member Descriptions

The member descriptions appear in alphabetical order within a class chapter regardless of what kind of method or field they are. This was done to make locating a member proceed as fast as possible.

Overloaded methods are placed together in one member description because they share very similar functionality. The different overloaded forms are typically provided as a convenience for the programmer when specifying parameters. For instance, some overloads eliminate parameters by providing common defaults. To describe overloads with missing parameters, we use a phrase of the form "if the parameter p is not specified, it defaults to the value 3.14." Other overloads take different representations of a value. For example, one overload could take a particular parameter as an integer, while another could take the same parameter as a string containing an integer.

Each member description contains some or all of the following fields:

PURPOSE A brief description of the purpose of this member
SYNTAX The syntactic declaration of this member
DESCRIPTION A full description of this member
PARAMETERS The parameters accepted by this member, if any, listed in alphabetical order
RETURNS The value and its range returned by this member, if any
EXCEPTIONS The exceptions and errors thrown by this member, if any, listed in alphabetical order
SEE ALSO Other related classes or members, if any, listed in alphabetical order
OVERRIDES The method that this member overrides, if any
EXAMPLE A code example that illustrates how this member is used. This is sometimes a reference to an example that illustrates the use of this method in another member example or class example.

Deprecation

A method or class is deprecated if its use is no longer recommended. A deprecated method appears in the Member Summary under the Deprecated Methods section. In the chapter body, the deprecated method is annotated by a "deprecated" tag in its method heading. For example, Component.size() is a deprecated method. It has the following method heading:

size() DEPRECATED

If not all of the overloaded forms of the method are deprecated, a "deprecated" tag appears beside the syntax of the deprecated forms. For example, one of the two forms of BorderLayout.addLayoutComponent() is deprecated. The second form shown below—the one with the "deprecated" tag—is deprecated.

SYNTAX public void addLayoutComponent(Component comp, Object location)
    DEPRECATED public void addLayoutComponent(String location, Component comp)

The method description contains a deprecation section with instructions on how to replace the usage of the deprecated method, like this:

DEPRECATION     A description of how to replace the usage of this deprecated method

How to Access the Examples

All of the code examples in this book have been compiled and run on the FCS version of Java 1.1.4, either on Solaris or Windows NT or both. Most of the complete examples are available on-line. You can access them and other information about this book by using the URL

...

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