Java Development with Ant

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Encompassing Java-centric software project best practices for designing and automating build, test, and deployment processes using ANT, this book is written for developers using Java in large software projects and those who have reached the limits of classic IDE development systems. Benefiting developers who apply extreme programming methodology to Java projects, this resource provides detailed coverage of ANT and explains how to use it in large projects and extend it when needed. In addition to using ANT for ...

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Overview

Encompassing Java-centric software project best practices for designing and automating build, test, and deployment processes using ANT, this book is written for developers using Java in large software projects and those who have reached the limits of classic IDE development systems. Benefiting developers who apply extreme programming methodology to Java projects, this resource provides detailed coverage of ANT and explains how to use it in large projects and extend it when needed. In addition to using ANT for Java applications, it includes discussions of servlets and J2EE applications, which cover the majority of Java development projects.

The most widely used build tool for Java projects, Ant is cross-platform, extensible, simple, and fast. It scales from small personal projects to large, multi-team J2EE projects. And, most importantly, it's easy to learn. Java Development with Ant systematically explores what Ant can do and how to apply it to your project. Whether you are new to Ant or an experienced user, this book will show you powerful and creative uses for Ant. The book emphasizes basic concepts you need to know to effectively use Ant starting with Ant's XML-driven build process. It leads you step-by-step through everything you need to know to compile, test, package, and deploy an application. It then guides you through the maze of more complex situations common in larger projects such as enterprise Java applications and Web Services. With this book you will gain access to a powerful tool to automatically build, test and deploy your Java software, no matter how simple or complex it might be.

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Editorial Reviews

From Barnes & Noble
The Barnes & Noble Review
Ant is the future of Java software build, test, and deployment. It's cross-platform, quick, extensible, and easy (goodbye makefiles!). It's a de facto standard for open-source Java projects of virtually every size and type. And, with Java Development with Ant, it's more useful and flexible than you ever imagined.

Eric Hatcher and Steve Loughran -- both official Ant project committers -- stretch Ant 1.5 for all it's worth. Through an example development project -- a documentation search engine -- they show how Ant automates mundane tasks and makes the "impossible" possible.

For instance, you'll learn how to use Cruise Control to generate new builds as code is checked into CVS (and automatically notify relevant developers when a build fails). You'll transform XML-based user manuals into web-based documentation (and even PDFs). You'll automate deployment to application servers. You'll test web applications and EJB layers through their own containers, using Cactus. As you may have guessed by now, this book is especially strong on its coverage of Ant add-ons. Ditto for Ant integration with other software, such as the JUnit testing framework and Tomcat application server.

The authors' application case study helps frame discussions of the entire Ant project lifecycle, from crafting reusable, easy-to-maintain build files through testing, continuous integration, packaging, and deployment. They also show Ant at work in developing SOAP/WSDL web services -- even in identifying potential interoperability issues. (Did you know there's an Ant task for compiling .NET C# programs?) Be prepared to be continually amazed -- and amazingly productive. Bill Camarda

Bill Camarda is a consultant, writer, and web/multimedia content developer. His 15 books include Special Edition Using Word 2000 and Upgrading & Fixing Networks For Dummies®, Second Edition.

Slashdot.org
A great resource for anyone wishing to learn how to integrate Ant into his personal set of best practices for software configuration management solutions.
From The Critics
Explaining the use of Ant, a Java-based build tool, Hatcher and Loughan, both part of Ant's active development community, explore managing software projects, third party Ant tasks, the integration of XML into the build process, working with Enterprise Java Beans, writing custom tasks, and other Ant-related topics. The reader is expected to already be familiar with Java. Annotation c. Book News, Inc., Portland, OR
From The Critics
From Slashdot.org
Rich in valuable information that is well organized and clearly presented. Java Development with Ant, written by Erik Hatcher and Steve Loughran who are both committers to the Apache Ant project, is a great resource for anyone wishing to learn how to integrate Ant into his personal set of best practices for software configuration management solutions.
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781930110588
  • Publisher: Manning Publications Company
  • Publication date: 8/28/2002
  • Pages: 672
  • Product dimensions: 7.34 (w) x 9.32 (h) x 1.43 (d)

Meet the Author

Erik Hatcher, one of the original Lucene in Action authors, is a committer on the Ant, Lucene, and Tapestry open-source projects, and coauthor of Manning's award-winning Java Development with Ant.

Steve Loughran has been an active user and developer of Ant since the year 2000, a committer on the project since 2001, and a member of the Apache Software Foundation since 2004. He regularly lectures on the problems of big-system builds, distributed testing, and deployment. He is a research scientist at Hewlett-Packard Laboratories in Bristol, UK.

Robinson is the author of a monthly on-line column at the Swing Connection and works as an engineer for WebScope, Inc.

Pavel Vorobiev has been a software developer for companies such as Right Works and Netfish Technologies where he was a senior software engineer and architect working on the design and development of procurement and B2Bi workflow software involving early-adopter XML standards, J2EE, and web services technologies. He was also a programmer analyst for Merrill Lynch. Pavel is the coauthor of JFC: Java Foundation Classes, Migrating from Java 1.0 to 1.1, The Java 1.1 Programmer's Reference, and The Official Netscape Java 1.1 Programming Book. He lives in San Leandro, California.

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Table of Contents

Forewordxxv
Prefacexxvii
Acknowledgmentsxxix
About this bookxxxi
About the authorsxxxvi
About the cover illustrationxxxvii
Part 1Learning Ant1
1Introducing Ant3
1.1What is Ant?3
1.2The core concepts of Ant5
1.3Why use Ant?10
1.4The evolution of Ant14
1.5Ant and software development methodologies16
1.6Our example project17
1.7Yeah, but can Ant...19
1.8Beyond Java development21
1.9Summary22
2Getting started with Ant23
2.1Defining our first project23
2.2Step one: verifying the tools are in place24
2.3Step two: writing your first Ant build file24
2.4Step three: running your first build26
2.5Step four: imposing structure31
2.6Step five: running our program39
2.7Ant command line options41
2.8The final build file44
2.9Summary46
3Understanding Ant datatypes and properties47
3.1Preliminaries48
3.2Introducing datatypes and properties with [left angle bracket]javac[right angle bracket]49
3.3Paths51
3.4Filesets52
3.5Patternsets54
3.6Selectors56
3.7Datatype element naming57
3.8Filterset58
3.9FilterChains and FilterReaders59
3.10Mappers61
3.11Additional Ant datatypes65
3.12Properties66
3.13Controlling Ant with properties77
3.14References79
3.15Best practices82
3.16Summary83
4Testing with JUnit85
4.1Refactoring86
4.2Java main() testing86
4.3JUnit primer87
4.4Applying unit tests to our application92
4.5The JUnit task--[left angle bracket]junit94
4.6Test failures are build failures97
4.7Generating test result reports100
4.8Short-circuiting tests105
4.9Best practices109
4.10Summary110
5Executing programs111
5.1Why you need to run external programs111
5.2Running Java programs112
5.3Starting native programs with 124
5.4Bulk execution with 130
5.5Processing output131
5.6Limitations on execution132
5.7Best practices132
5.8Summary133
6Packaging projects134
6.1Moving, copying, and deleting files135
6.2Preparing to package139
6.3Creating archive files146
6.4Creating Zip files154
6.5Creating tar files158
6.6Creating web applications with WAR files160
6.7Testing packaging161
6.8Summary162
7Deployment163
7.1Example deployment problems164
7.2Tasks for deployment165
7.3FTP-based distribution of a packaged application171
7.4Email-based distribution of a packaged application173
7.5Local deployment to Tomcat 4.x174
7.6Remote deployment to Tomcat181
7.7Testing deployment187
7.8Summary187
8Putting it all together188
8.1Our application thus far188
8.2Building the custom Ant task library189
8.3Loading common properties across multiple projects194
8.4Handling versioned dependencies196
8.5Build file philosophy200
8.6Summary201
Part 2Applying Ant203
9Using Ant in your development projects205
9.1Designing an Ant-based build process206
9.2Migrating to Ant209
9.3The ten steps of migration210
9.4Master builds: managing large projects212
9.5Managing child project builds221
9.6Creating reusable library build files228
9.7Looking ahead: large project support evolution230
9.8Ant project best practices231
9.9Summary233
10Beyond Ant's core tasks234
10.1Understanding types of tasks235
10.2Optional tasks in action237
10.3Using software configuration management tasks245
10.4Using third-party tasks247
10.5Notable third-party tasks248
10.6The ant-contrib tasks253
10.7Sharing task definitions among projects258
10.8Best practices258
10.9Summary259
11XDoclet260
11.1Installing XDoclet261
11.2To-do list generation261
11.3XDoclet architecture262
11.4Writing your own XDoclet template265
11.5Advanced XDoclet273
11.6The direction of XDoclet275
11.7XDoclet best practices276
11.8Summary277
12Developing for the web278
12.1How are web applications different?279
12.2Working with tag libraries280
12.3Compiling JSP pages288
12.4Customizing web applications292
12.5Generating static content297
12.6Testing web applications with HttpUnit299
12.7Server-side testing with Cactus310
12.8Summary315
13Working with XML317
13.1Preamble: all about XML libraries318
13.2Validating XML319
13.3Transforming XML with XSLT323
13.4Generating an XML build log327
13.5Loading XML data into Ant properties331
13.6Next steps in XML processing332
13.7Summary332
14Enterprise JavaBeans333
14.1EJB overview333
14.2A simple EJB build335
14.3Using Ant's EJB tasks336
14.4Using [left angle bracket]ejbjar[right angle bracket]337
14.5Using XDoclet for EJB development340
14.6Middlegen345
14.7Deploying to J2EE application servers348
14.8A complete EJB example349
14.9Best practices in EJB projects354
14.10Summary354
15Working with web services355
15.1What are web services and what is SOAP?356
15.2Creating a SOAP client application with Ant357
15.3Creating a SOAP service with Axis and Ant363
15.4Adding web services to an existing web application367
15.5Writing a client for our SOAP service371
15.6What is interoperability, and why is it a problem?376
15.7Building a C# client376
15.8The rigorous way to build a web service381
15.9Reviewing web service development382
15.10Calling Ant via SOAP383
15.11Summary384
16Continuous integration386
16.1Scheduling Ant builds with the operating system387
16.2CruiseControl388
16.3Anthill397
16.4Gump401
16.5Comparison of continuous integration tools405
16.6Summary406
17Developing native code407
17.1The challenge of native code407
17.2Using existing build tools408
17.3Introducing the [left angle bracket]cc[right angle bracket] task410
17.4Building a JNI library in Ant412
17.5Going cross-platform422
17.6Looking at [left angle bracket]cc[right angle bracket] in more detail425
17.7Distributing native libraries429
17.8Summary430
18Production deployment431
18.1The challenge of different application servers432
18.2Working with operations437
18.3Addressing the deployment challenge with Ant440
18.4Introducing Ant's deployment power tools442
18.5Building a production deployment process446
18.6Deploying to specific application servers456
18.7Verifying deployment459
18.8Best practices462
18.9Summary463
Part 3Extending Ant465
19Writing Ant tasks467
19.1What exactly is an Ant task?468
19.2Ant API primer470
19.3How tasks get data474
19.4Creating a basic Ant Task subclass483
19.5Operating on a fileset485
19.6Error handling486
19.7Testing Ant tasks487
19.8Executing external programs487
19.9Executing a Java program within a task490
19.10Supporting arbitrarily named elements and attributes493
19.11Building a task library495
19.12Supporting multiple versions of Ant497
19.13Summary497
20Extending Ant Further498
20.1Scripting within Ant499
20.2Listeners and loggers502
20.3Developing a custom mapper514
20.4Creating custom selectors515
20.5Implementing a custom filter517
20.6Summary520
AInstallation523
BXML primer as it applies to Ant532
CIDE integration536
DThe elements of Ant style544
EAnt task reference561
Resources621
Index625
License635
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  • Anonymous

    Posted August 23, 2002

    The book on learning, using and extending Ant 1.5

    First, I must disclose my bias: I am one of the authors. I'm also one of the Ant developers, and we wrote this book while Ant1.5 was being developed; you could argue both products evolved together. <p> This book set out to fill in the gaps left in the on-line documentation, adding eight chapters to take beginners step by step through using ant to build, test and deploy projects. We are pretty rigorous about testing early on, and get into JUnit in a big way. <p> The second section of the 600 page book, by and away the largest section, is how to apply Ant. Here we write up stuff that is on the leading edge of ant-based development: Xdoclet-based struts and EJB coding, Web Service development and testing, how to build and test JNI libaries, and other topics. We also have a chapter on setting up an automated process using third party Ant hosting tools, for a Continuous Integration process. <p> One area Ant is good at is deployment, so we ended up devoting two whole chapters to the subject; one in each of the first two sections. If you want to get your Java code out to a server somewhere, you can learn a lot from our past experiences, and take on our suggestions as to how to do it right. <p> The third and final section of the book shows how to extend ant through Java code. We don't go into as much depth there as is possible; in open source projects the whole source tree is there to be examined. We decided not to scare people with the gory details of how Ant works. Instead we give a broad introduction to how to write new Tasks, Selectors, Listeners and Filters; the extension mechanisms that ant offers for advanced users. <p> We hope you like it. We had a lot of fun writing it!

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