Java in a Nutshell [NOOK Book]

Overview

With more than 700,000 copies sold to date, Java in a Nutshell from O'Reilly is clearly the favorite resource amongst the legion of developers and programmers using Java technology. And now, with the release of the 5.0 version of Java, O'Reilly has given the book that defined the "in a Nutshell" category another impressive tune-up.

In this latest revision, readers will find Java in a Nutshell, 5th Edition, does more than just cover the extensive changes implicit in 5.0, the ...

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Java in a Nutshell

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Overview

With more than 700,000 copies sold to date, Java in a Nutshell from O'Reilly is clearly the favorite resource amongst the legion of developers and programmers using Java technology. And now, with the release of the 5.0 version of Java, O'Reilly has given the book that defined the "in a Nutshell" category another impressive tune-up.

In this latest revision, readers will find Java in a Nutshell, 5th Edition, does more than just cover the extensive changes implicit in 5.0, the newest version of Java. It's undergone a complete makeover--in scope, size, and type of coverage--in order to more closely meet the needs of the modern Java programmer.

To wit, Java in a Nutshell, 5th Edition now places less emphasis on coming to Java from C and C++, and adds more discussion on tools and frameworks. It also offers new code examples to illustrate the working of APIs, and, of course, extensive coverage of Java 5.0. But faithful readers take comfort: it still hasn't lost any of its core elements that made it such a classic to begin with.

This handy reference gets right to the heart of the program with an accelerated introduction to the Javaprogramming language and its key APIs--ideal for developers wishing to start writing code right away. And, as was the case in previous editions, Java in a Nutshell, 5th Edition is once again chock-full of poignant tips, techniques, examples, and practical advice. For as longas Java has existed, Java in a Nutshell has helped developers maximize the capabilities of the program's newest versions. And this latest edition is no different.

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Editorial Reviews

Library Journal
O'Reilly books are rarely for neophytes, but advanced users swear by them, and these will be no exception. Englander covers a hot Java subtopic for students, programmers, and professionals already familar with Java and object-oriented programming. He discusses events, event adapters, properties, persistence, java archive files, the BeanBox tool, property editors, ActiveX, and the java.beans Package. Flanagan's work is the book Java programmers want nearby when they are at the keyboard. A complete ready-reference work, this belongs in all collections supporting programmers. Java is a constantly changing language so Nutshell will be coming out often with new editions; always have the newest one on hand. Reese goes beyond simple applet design to relational databases, SQL, object-oriented database applications, application servers, and remote object manipulation. The examples used throughout the book are based on a banking application designed in Java.
Library Journal
O'Reilly books are rarely for neophytes, but advanced users swear by them, and these will be no exception. Englander covers a hot Java subtopic for students, programmers, and professionals already familar with Java and object-oriented programming. He discusses events, event adapters, properties, persistence, java archive files, the BeanBox tool, property editors, ActiveX, and the java.beans Package. Flanagan's work is the book Java programmers want nearby when they are at the keyboard. A complete ready-reference work, this belongs in all collections supporting programmers. Java is a constantly changing language so Nutshell will be coming out often with new editions; always have the newest one on hand. Reese goes beyond simple applet design to relational databases, SQL, object-oriented database applications, application servers, and remote object manipulation. The examples used throughout the book are based on a banking application designed in Java.
Booknews
The second edition contains an introduction to key Java concepts, descriptions of all classes in the core Java 1.1 API, and a description of the syntax of the Java language. It also includes an advanced introduction to Java for C and C++ programmers; an overview of all the new features in Java 1.1, both on a package-by-package basis and in terms of overall functionality; a tutorial on inner classes, explaining how to use all the new types of inner classes; and a quick reference for all classes, methods, and variables in the core Java 1.1 API.
Annotation c. by Book News, Inc., Portland, Oregon
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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9781449366681
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 3/15/2005
  • Series: In a Nutshell (O'Reilly)
  • Sold by: Barnes & Noble
  • Format: eBook
  • Edition number: 5
  • Pages: 1256
  • Sales rank: 524,836
  • File size: 11 MB
  • Note: This product may take a few minutes to download.

Meet the Author

David Flanagan is a computer programmer who spends most of his time writing about JavaScript and Java. His books with O'Reilly include Java in a Nutshell, Java Examples in a Nutshell, Java Foundation Classes in a Nutshell, JavaScript: The Definitive Guide, and JavaScript Pocket Reference. David has a degree in computer science and engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He lives with his wife and children in the U.S. Pacific Northwest bewteen the cities of Seattle, Washington and Vancouver, British Columbia. David has a blog at www.davidflanagan.com.

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Table of Contents

Preface
Part I: Introducing Java
Chapter 1. Getting Started with Java
Chapter 2. How Java Differs from C
Chapter 3. Classes and Objects in Java

Part II: Introducing Java 1.1
Chapter 4. What's New in Java 1.1
Chapter 5. Inner Classes and Other New Language Features

Part III: Programming with the Java 1.1 API
Chapter 6. Applets
Chapter 7. Events
Chapter 8. New AWT Features
Chapter 9. Object Serialization
Chapter 10. Java Beans
Chapter 11. Internationalization
Chapter 12. Reflection

Part IV: Java Language Reference
Chapter 13. Java Syntax
Chapter 14. System Properties
Chapter 15. Java-Related HTML Tags
Chapter 16. JDK Tools

Part V: API Quick Reference
How To Use This Quick Reference
Chapter 17. The java.applet Package
Chapter 18. The java.awt Package
Chapter 19. The java.awt.datatransfer Package
Chapter 20. The java.awt.event Package
Chapter 21. The java.awt.image Package
Chapter 22. The java.awt.peer Package
Chapter 23. The java.beans Package
Chapter 24. The java.io Package
Chapter 25. The java.lang Package
Chapter 26. The java.lang.reflect Package
Chapter 27. The java.math Package
Chapter 28. The java.net Package
Chapter 29. The java.text Package
Chapter 30. The java.util Package
Chapter 31. The java.util.zip Package
Chapter 32. Class, Method, and Field Index
Index

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Customer Reviews

Average Rating 3.5
( 12 )
Rating Distribution

5 Star

(2)

4 Star

(5)

3 Star

(2)

2 Star

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1 Star

(3)

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Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews
  • Posted September 9, 2011

    It's a Reference, how much can you say?

    I bought the book; I'll use it when I need to reference specific classes of functionality. It's not like I'm using it everyday.

    Was this review helpful? Yes  No   Report this review
  • Anonymous

    Posted September 7, 2007

    Not for the Faint of Heart

    The subject of this book is presented in a direct, technical, no-nonsense manner. The information is very useful to those with a technical background - especially in programming. Those just starting out would probably be better served by approaching this subject at a lower level. For those with experience, everything is there (although, at times it does get a little dry).

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  • Anonymous

    Posted April 8, 2005

    good sign of Java's vitality

    Recently, Sun gave us a significant upgrade to Java - the release of Java 5. A slew of the inevitable bug fixes. But also key new features, as explained here by Flanagan in the 5th edition of his long running reference. Some new abilities lead to notational simplification, like autoboxing. So if k is an Integer, you can now say 'k=5' instead of the clumsier 'k=new Integer(5)'. With a similar inverse process if q is an int, of being able to write 'q=k' rather than 'q=k.intValue()'. Though of course the older forms are still valid, for backward compatibility. Hey, varargs are now allowed! Much to the pleasure of some of you who came from C programming and used this nice feature. Ever since Java came out, there has been a continual, albeit quiet, push for varargs. Finally! By now, experienced Java programmers may be familiar with earlier versions of the book. There may be mild astonishment at the sheer heft of this edition. Thanks to its popularity, Java has bulked up in the number and scope of its classes. The book is a reassuring sign of Java's vitality.

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  • Anonymous

    Posted December 1, 2009

    No text was provided for this review.

Sort by: Showing all of 4 Customer Reviews

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