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Java Software Structures: Designing and Using Data Structures / Edition 4

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More About This Textbook

Overview

The fourth edition of Java Software Structures embraces the enhancements of the latest version of Java, where all structures and collections are based on generics. The framework of the text walks the reader through three main areas: conceptualization, explanation, and implementation, allowing for a consistent and coherent introduction to data structures. Readers will learn how to develop high-quality software systems using well-designed collections and algorithms.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780133250121
  • Publisher: Addison-Wesley
  • Publication date: 3/11/2013
  • Edition description: New Edition
  • Edition number: 4
  • Pages: 576
  • Sales rank: 477,796
  • Product dimensions: 7.40 (w) x 9.10 (h) x 1.00 (d)

Table of Contents

Preface vii

Chapter 1 Introduction 1

1.1 Software Quality 2

Correctness 3

Reliability 3

Robustness 4

Usability 4

Maintainability 5

Reusability 5

Portability 6

Efficiency 6

Quality Issues 6

1.2 Data Structures 7

A Physical Example 7

Containers as Objects 10

Chapter 2 Analysis of Algorithms 15

2.1 Algorithm Efficiency 16

2.2 Growth Functions and Big-Oh Notation 17

2.3 Comparing Growth Functions 19

2.4 Determining Time Complexity 22

Analyzing Loop Execution 22

Nested Loops 22

Method Calls 23

Chapter 3 Introduction to Collections — Stacks 29

3.1 Collections 30

Abstract Data Types 31

The Java Collections API 33

3.2 A Stack Collection 33

3.3 Crucial OO Concepts 35

Inheritance and Polymorphism 36

Generics 37

3.4 Using Stacks: Evaluating Postfix Expressions 38

Javadoc 45

3.5 Exceptions 46

3.6 A Stack ADT 48

3.7 Implementing a Stack: With Arrays 51

Managing Capacity 52

3.8 The ArrayStack Class 53

The Constructors 54

The push Operation 56

The pop Operation 57

The peek Operation 59

Other Operations 59

The EmptyCollectionException Class 59

Other Implementations 60

Chapter 4 Linked Structures — Stacks 67

4.1 R eferences as Links 68

4.2 Managing Linked Lists 70

Accessing Elements 70

Inserting Nodes 71

Deleting Nodes 72

4.3 Elements without Links 73

Doubly Linked Lists 73

4.4 Stacks in the Java API 74

4.5 Using Stacks: Traversing a Maze 75

4.6 Implementing a Stack: With Links 84

The LinkedStack Class 84

The push Operation 88

The pop Operation 90

Other Operations 91

Chapter 5 Queues 97

5.1 A Conceptual Queue 98

5.2 Queues in the Java API 99

5.3 Using Queues: Code Keys 100

5.4 Using Queues: Ticket Counter Simulation 104

5.5 A Queue ADT 109

5.6 A Linked Implementation of a Queue 111

The enqueue Operation 113

The dequeue Operation 115

Other Operations 116

5.7 Implementing Queues: With Arrays 117

The enqueue Operation 121

The dequeue Operation 123

Other Operations 124

5.8 Double-Ended Queues (Deque) 124

Chapter 6 Lists 129

6.1 A List Collection 130

6.2 Lists in the Java Collections API 132

6.3 Using Unordered Lists: Program of Study 133

6.4 Using Indexed Lists: Josephus 144

6.5 A List ADT 146

Adding Elements to a List 147

6.6 Implementing Lists with Arrays 152

The remove Operation 154

The contains Operation 156

The add Operation for an Ordered List 157

Operations Particular to Unordered Lists 159

The addAfter Operation for an Unordered List 159

6.7 Implementing Lists with Links 160

The remove Operation 161

Chapter 7 Iterators 169

7.1 What’s an Iterator? 170

Other Iterator Issues 172

7.2 Using Iterators: Program of Study Revisited 172

Printing Certain Courses 176

Removing Courses 177

7.3 Implementing Iterators: With Arrays 179

7.4 Implementing Iterators: With Links 181

Chapter 8 Recursion 187

8.1 Recursive Thinking 188

Infinite Recursion 188

Recursion in Math 189

8.2 Recursive Programming 190

Recursion versus Iteration 193

Direct versus Indirect Recursion 193

8.3 Using Recursion 194

Traversing a Maze 194

The Towers of Hanoi 202

8.4 Analyzing Recursive Algorithms 207

Chapter 9 Searching and Sorting 215

9.1 Searching 216

Static Methods 217

Generic Methods 217

Linear Search 218

Binary Search 220

Comparing Search Algorithms 222

9.2 Sorting 223

Selection Sort 226

Insertion Sort 228

Bubble Sort 230

Quick Sort 232

Merge Sort 236

9.3 Radix Sort 239

Chapter 10 Trees 249

10.1 Trees 250

Tree Classifications 251

10.2 Strategies for Implementing Trees 253

Computational Strategy for Array

Implementation of Trees 253

Simulated Link Strategy for Array

Implementation of Trees 253

Analysis of Trees 255

10.3 Tree Traversals 256

Preorder Traversal 256

Inorder Traversal 257

Postorder Traversal 257

Level-Order Traversal 258

10.4 A Binary Tree ADT 259

10.5 Using Binary Trees: Expression Trees 263

10.6 A Back Pain Analyzer 275

10.7 Implementing Binary Trees with Links 279

The find Method 284

The iteratorInOrder Method 286

Chapter 11 Binary Search Trees 293

11.1 A Binary Search Tree 294

11.2 Implementing Binary Search Trees: With Links 296

The addElement Operation 297

The removeElement Operation 300

The removeAllOccurrences Operation 303

The removeMin Operation 304

Implementing Binary Search Trees: With Arrays 306

11.3 Using Binary Search Trees: Implementing

Ordered Lists 306

Analysis of the BinarySearchTreeList

Implementation 309

11.4 Balanced Binary Search Trees 310

Right Rotation 311

Left Rotation 312

Rightleft Rotation 313

Leftright Rotation 313

11.5 Implementing BSTs: AVL Trees 314

Right Rotation in an AVL Tree 315

Left Rotation in an AVL Tree 315

Rightleft Rotation in an AVL Tree 315

Leftright Rotation in an AVL Tree 317

11.6 Implementing BSTs: Red/Black Trees 317

Insertion into a Red/Black Tree 318

Element Removal from a Red/Black Tree 321

Chapter 12 Heaps and Priority Queues 331

12.1 A Heap 332

The addElement Operation 334

The removeMin Operation 335

The findMin Operation 336

12.2 Using Heaps: Priority Queues 336

12.3 Implementing Heaps: With Links 340

The addElement Operation 342

The removeMin Operation 344

The findMin Operation 347

12.4 Implementing Heaps: With Arrays 347

The addElement Operation 349

The removeMin Operation 350

The findMin Operation 352

12.5 Using Heaps: Heap Sort 352

Chapter 13 Sets and Maps 359

13.1 Set and Map Collections 360

13.2 Sets and Maps in the Java API 360

13.3 Using Sets: Domain Blocker 363

13.4 Using Maps: Product Sales 366

13.5 Using Maps: User Management 370

13.6 Implementing Sets and Maps Using Trees 375

13.7 Implementing Sets and Maps Using Hashing 375

Chapter 14 Multi-way Search Trees 383

14.1 Combining Tree Concepts 384

14.2 2-3 Trees 384

Inserting Elements into a 2-3 Tree 385

Removing Elements from a 2-3 Tree 387

14.3 2-4 Trees 390

14.4 B-Trees 392

B*-Trees 393

B+-Trees 393

Analysis of B-Trees 394

14.5 Implementation Strategies for B-Trees 394

Chapter 15 Graphs 401

15.1 Undirected Graphs 402

15.2 Directed Graphs 403

15.3 Networks 405

15.4 Common Graph Algorithms 406

Traversals 406

Testing for Connectivity 410

Minimum Spanning Trees 412

Determining the Shortest Path 415

15.5 Strategies for Implementing Graphs 415

Adjacency Lists 416

Adjacency Matrices 416

15.6 Implementing Undirected Graphs with an Adjacency Matrix 417

The addEdge Method 422

The addVertex Method 422

The expandCapacity Method 423

Other Methods 424

Appendix A UML 429

The Unified Modeling Language (UML) 430

UML Class Diagrams 430

UML Relationships 432

Appendix B Object-Oriented Design 437

B.1 Overview of Object-Orientation 438

B.2 Using Objects 438

Abstraction 439

Creating Objects 440

B.3 C lass Libraries and Packages 442

The import Declaration 442

B.4 State and Behavior 443

B.5 Classes 444

Instance Data 447

B.6 Encapsulation 448

Visibility Modifiers 448

Local Data 450

B.7 Constructors 450

B.8 Method Overloading 451

B.9 R eferences Revisited 452

The Null Reference 452

The this Reference 453

Aliases 455

Garbage Collection 456

Passing Objects as Parameters 457

B.10 The static Modifier 457

Static Variables 458

Static Methods 458

B.11 Wrapper Classes 459

B.12 Interfaces 460

The Comparable Interface 461

B.13 Inheritance 462

Derived Classes 462

The protected Modifier 464

The super Reference 465

Overriding Methods 465

B.14 C lass Hierarchies 466

The Object Class 467

Abstract Classes 468

Interface Hierarchies 470

B.15 Polymorphism 470

References and Class Hierarchies 471

Polymorphism via Inheritance 472

Polymorphism via Interfaces 472

B.16 Exceptions 475

Exception Messages 476

The try Statement 476

Exception Propagation 477

The Exception Class Hierarchy 478

Appendix C Java Graphics 489

C.1 Pixels and Coordinates 490

C.2 Representing Color 491

C.3 Drawing Shapes 492

C.4 Polygons and Polylines 501

The Polygon Class 504

Appendix D Graphical User Interfaces 511

D.1 GUI Elements 512

Frames and Panels 513

Buttons and Action Events 517

Determining Event Sources 519

D.2 More Components 522

Text Fields 522

Check Boxes 525

Radio Buttons 529

Sliders 533

Combo Boxes 538

Timers 543

D.3 Layout Managers 548

Flow Layout 550

Border Layout 553

Grid Layout 557

Box Layout 560

Containment Hierarchies 563

D.4 Mouse and Key Events 563

Mouse Events 563

Key Events 572

Extending Adapter Classes 578

D.5 Dialog Boxes 579

File Choosers 582

Color Choosers 585

D.6 Some Important Details 586

Borders 586

Tool Tips and Mnemonics 590

D.7 GUI Design 597

Appendix E Hashing 607

E.1 Hashing 608

E.2 Hashing Functions 610

The Division Method 610

The Folding Method 611

The Mid-Square Method 611

The Radix Transformation Method 612

The Digit Analysis Method 612

The Length-Dependent Method 612

Hashing Functions in the Java Language 613

E.3 Resolving Collisions 613

Chaining 613

Open Addressing 616

E.4 Deleting Elements from a Hash Table 620

Deleting from a Chained Implementation 620

Deleting from an Open Addressing

Implementation 621

E.5 Hash Tables in the Java Collections API 622

The Hashtable Class 622

The HashSet Class 624

The HashMap Class 624

The IdentityHashMap Class 625

The WeakHashMap Class 626

LinkedHashSet and LinkedHashMap 627

Appendix F Regular Expressions 635

Index 639

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