Java Web Services

Overview

For many Java developers, web services appeared to come out of nowhere. Its advantages are clear: web services are platform-independent (like Java itself), language-agnostic (a clear advantage over Java RMI), can easily be tunneled through firewalls (an obvious benefit to anyone who has dealt with modern enterprise networks), object-oriented (we all know about that), and tends to be loosely coupled (allowing more flexible application development). But these advantages have been obscured by a cloud of hype and a ...

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Overview

For many Java developers, web services appeared to come out of nowhere. Its advantages are clear: web services are platform-independent (like Java itself), language-agnostic (a clear advantage over Java RMI), can easily be tunneled through firewalls (an obvious benefit to anyone who has dealt with modern enterprise networks), object-oriented (we all know about that), and tends to be loosely coupled (allowing more flexible application development). But these advantages have been obscured by a cloud of hype and a proliferation of jargon that are difficult to penetrate. What are SOAP, UDDI, WSDL, and JAXM? To say nothing of JAXR, tModels, category bags, WSFL, and other friends? And assuming that you understand what they are, how do you do anything with them? Do they live up to their promises? Are they really the future of network computing, or a dead end?

Java Web Services gives the experienced Java developer a way into the Web Services world. It helps you to understand what's going on, what the technologies mean and how they relate, and shows Java developers how to put them to use to solve real problems. You'll learn what's real and what isn't; what the technologies are really supposed to do, and how they do it. Java Web Services shows you how to use SOAP to perform remote method calls and message passing; how to use WSDL to describe the interface to a web service or understand the interface of someone else's service; and how to use UDDI to advertise (publish) and look up services in each local or global registry. Java Web Services also discusses security issues, interoperability issues, integration with other Java enterprise technologies like EJB; the work being done on the JAXM and
JAX-RPC packages, and integration with Microsoft's .NET services.

The web services picture is still taking shape; there are many platforms and APIs to consider, and many conflicting claims from different marketing groups. And although web services are inherently language-independent, the fit between the fundamental principles on which Java and web services are based means that Java will almost certainly be the predominant language for web services development. If you're a Java developer and want to climb on the web services bandwagon, or if you only want to "kick the tires" and find out what web services has to offer, you will find this book indispensable.

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Product Details

  • ISBN-13: 9780596002695
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media, Incorporated
  • Publication date: 3/28/2002
  • Edition description: First Edition
  • Edition number: 1
  • Pages: 278
  • Product dimensions: 7.10 (w) x 9.22 (h) x 0.68 (d)

Meet the Author

Tyler Jewell, Director, Technical Evangelism, BEA Systems Tyler oversees BEA's technology evangelism efforts that are focused on driving early adoption of strategic BEA technologies into the ISV and developer community. He is the key figure for creating the joint technical alignment with many partners. He is also a technologist with expertise in Web Services, large-scale system design, and application infrastructures. Tyler is author of Java Web Services (O'Reilly, 2002), Mastering Enterprise JavaBeans 2.0 (Wiley, 2001) and Professional Java Server Programming J2EE 1.3 (Wrox, 2001). Tyler is a member of O'Reilly's Editorial Masthead and maintains a monthly J2EE column at www.onjava.com. He is also on the editorial boards of Sys-Con's WebLogic Developer's Journal and Web Services Journal and is the technology advisor to www.theserverside.com

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Table of Contents

Preface;
Who Should Read This Book?;
Organization;
Software and Versions;
Conventions;
Comments and Questions;
Acknowledgments;
Chapter 1: Welcome to Web Services;
1.1 What Are Web Services?;
1.2 Web Services Adoption Factors;
1.3 Web Services in a J2EE Environment;
1.4 What This Book Discusses;
Chapter 2: Inside the Composite Computing Model;
2.1 Service-Oriented Architecture;
2.2 The P2P Model;
Chapter 3: SOAP: The Cornerstone of Interoperability;
3.1 Simple;
3.2 Object;
3.3 Access;
3.4 Protocol;
3.5 Anatomy of a SOAP Message;
3.6 Sending and Receiving SOAP Messages;
3.7 The Apache SOAP Routing Service;
3.8 SOAP with Attachments;
Chapter 4: SOAP-RPC, SOAP-Faults, and Misunderstandings;
4.1 SOAP-RPC;
4.2 Error Handling with SOAP Faults;
4.3 SOAP Intermediaries and Actors;
Chapter 5: Web Services Description Language;
5.1 Introduction to WSDL;
5.2 Anatomy of a WSDL Document;
5.3 Best Practices, Makes Perfect;
5.4 Where Is All the Java?;
Chapter 6: UDDI: Universal Description, Discovery, and Integration;
6.1 UDDI Overview;
6.2 UDDI Specifications and Java-Based APIs;
6.3 Programming UDDI;
6.4 Using WSDL Definitions with UDDI;
Chapter 7: JAX-RPC and JAXM;
7.1 Java API for XML Messaging (JAXM);
7.2 JAX-RPC;
7.3 SOAPElement API;
7.4 JAX-RPC Client Invocation Models;
Chapter 8: J2EE and Web Services;
8.1 The SOAP-J2EE Way;
8.2 The Java Web Service (JWS) Standard;
Chapter 9: Web Services Interoperability;
9.1 The Concept of Interoperability;
9.2 The Good, Bad, and Ugly of Interoperability;
9.3 Potential Interoperability Issues;
9.4 SOAPBuilders Interoperability;
9.5 Other Interoperability Resources;
9.6 Resources;
Chapter 10: Web Services Security;
10.1 Incorporating Security Within XML;
10.2 XML Digital Signatures;
10.3 XML Encryption;
10.4 SOAP Security Extensions;
10.5 Further Reading;
Credits;
Colophon;
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