Java Web Services in a Nutshell

Java Web Services in a Nutshell

4.0 1
by Kim Topley
     
 

Java Web Services in a Nutshell is a high-speed tutorial and a quick reference for the technologies that Sun Microsystems is creating for implementing web services with Java. This book is a succinct introduction and handy reference to the Java/XML APIs, more commonly known as the JWSDP or "Java Web Services Development Pack." These APIs are taking the Java

Overview

Java Web Services in a Nutshell is a high-speed tutorial and a quick reference for the technologies that Sun Microsystems is creating for implementing web services with Java. This book is a succinct introduction and handy reference to the Java/XML APIs, more commonly known as the JWSDP or "Java Web Services Development Pack." These APIs are taking the Java world by storm, as they are capable of handling everything from simple XML to SOAP to full ebXML vocabularies.Although "web services" technology has suffered from much hype and overly grand expectations, there is plenty of solid development going on, especially in extending enterprise applications, and a huge amount of this development is being done in Java. As a result, the J2EE APIs for web services are evolving rapidly, and this new "in a Nutshell" book covers them all in depth.One of the most important APIs in the JWSDP is JAX-RPC (Java API for XML-based RPC). It's also the API that developers most consistently post questions about. Java Web Services in a Nutshell covers all aspects of JAX-RPC in detail, with tutorial coverage alone exceeding 150 pages. This book offers developers everything they need to program with JAX-RPC.Java Web Services in a Nutshell begins with an introduction to Java web services, including a discussion of how they differ from web applications. The author looks at the protocols and interfaces that underpin web services, the J2EE technologies that address web services, WSDL as the means for describe web services, and more. Subsequent chapters cover:

  • JAX-RPC
  • SOAP and the SOAP with Attachments API for Java (SAAJ)
  • Reliable SOAP messaging with JAXM
  • WSDL
  • Advanced JAX-RPC
  • JAXR, the XML-based registry API
  • Web Services Tools
The balance of the book is made up of an API Quick Reference containing documentation for the various API packages.Intended for Java developers who need to implement Java services or who need their applications to access existing web services, Java Web Services in a Nutshell delivers practical information to help developers make sense of the rapidly changing and poorly organized official documentation. If web services and Enterprise Java are any part of your job description — of if you'd like them to be — you'll want this book close beside as you work.

Product Details

ISBN-13:
9780596003999
Publisher:
O'Reilly Media, Incorporated
Publication date:
06/01/2003
Series:
In a Nutshell (O'Reilly) Series
Pages:
672
Product dimensions:
6.14(w) x 9.06(h) x 1.20(d)

Meet the Author

Kim Topley has more than 25 years experience as a software developer and was one of the first people in the world to obtain the Sun Certified Java Developer qualification. He is a freelance Java developer based near London, England and is the author of Core JFC and Core Swing, from Prentice-Hall.

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Java Web Services in a Nutshell 4 out of 5 based on 0 ratings. 1 reviews.
Guest More than 1 year ago
O'Reilly originally made its name in the technical field in the late 80s by publishing what became the definitive texts for programming X11 Windows. (Perhaps an unconscious emulation of the German Handbuchs of science and engineering.) Since then, O'Reilly has striven to do likewise in many other branches of computing. To many programmers, the existence of an O'Reilly book on a topic is proof that the topic is now authoritatively and independently covered. Now, Topley and O'Reilly have presented us with this book, on Web Services. A positive sign for the field. As with other texts by the publisher, it crams a lot between its covers. Topley assumes you are familiar with writing GUIs in Java Swing/AWT; ie. with the building of 'core' standalone Java applications. Web Services are inherently multimachine constructs. Which makes writing an explanatory text a little tricky. More pieces to plug together (and fall apart). Topley is careful to point out that this field is still embryonic. Thus far, few (none?) commercial mission-critical applications exist. Also, the standard for secure Web Services is still jelling. True, there is always HTTPS. But it doesn't seem to allow for finer grained encryption and the field is casting for a better answer. So the choice is yours. Wait a year or so till some of these issues get resolved. Or, more pertinently perhaps, you want make an impact in this field now?